Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

I’d tell you that I’m recovering a cold, which started on Thursday and completely derailed me on Friday. Since getting back in town, I’ve mainly caught up on work.

On Thursday I helped interview candidates to teach for the JET Program in Japan. I’ve done this every year that I can for the last few years and I like seeing candidates excited to go overseas, but I always come away wishing people had used specifics to demonstrate their strengths  and in one case had come on time. One candidate just had 10 minutes because she went back to her car to get something. Determining whether someone can successfully live and work in another country takes longer than 10 minutes. As great as her paperwork looked, missing so much time can’t be overlooked.

Wednesday a partner and I recruited for the Census at a Jewish social service agency in Northbrook. We had a good turnout and it was good to see that people who’re sure to make good workers but have been out of work a while apply. I love giving opportunities to people like this.

Yesterday was the last night for Restaurant Week. A friend and I went to Wildfire where I savored their Cesar salad, petit filet mignon, au gratin potatoes and chocolate cream pie.

 

 

Sepia Saturday

kids.jpg

This week Sepia Saturday inspires bloggers with a fondness for days gone by to post photos of groups of children. Join the fun.

kidsblackboard

Desoronto Archives, 1912

Look at the regal lady posted on top.

breaker bosy255_c

Library of Congress, 1910

Above we see a group of Breaker Boys.  According to Wikipedia:

“A breaker boy was a coal-mining worker in the United States and United Kingdom whose job was to separate impurities from coal by hand in a coal breaker. Although breaker boys were primarily children, elderly coal miners who could no longer work in the mines because of age, disease, or accident were also sometimes employed as breaker boys. The use of breaker boys began in the mid-1860s. Although public disapproval of the employment of children as breaker boys existed by the mid-1880s, the practice did not end until the 1920s.”

kids w tools_c

National Library of Australia, circa 1910

Arbor Day in Australia (above).

Click here to see more Sepia Saturday posts.

Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

I’d tell you that I got to see It’s a Wonderful Life at the Music Box Theater. I’ve loved seeing their Christmas show and White Christmas three times. When my friend who lives in France came home and invited me and some friends to see It’s a Wonderful Life there. I wasn’t sure it would be as fun, but it really was. The carols with the organist were jolly and one couple came dressed up with the lady in a bathrobe with BFHS* on the back and the man in an old time football uniform. Whenever Mr. Potter rolled in the audience hissed. Whenever there was a little romance the audience reacted with wit.

I’m lucky I got to the theater as the night before on the way home from working, I got a flat tire. Ugh! I was able to park in a retirement home parking lot. I had an hour to get to a party so I didn’t have time to wait for roadside service. Thus I had to deal with the car in the morning and the film started at noon so I didn’t have much time for delays. Luckily, the service came as scheduled and all was well, though I was leery of driving into the city on a spare.

Last Tuesday I did some Census recruiting at a local Toastmaster’s Club. This club’s been around since the 1920s! Many did apply, but one bonus was that I got to see how this public speaking club worked. I was impressed by the sense of community and support. In fact, I may very well join in the spring.

*Bedford Falls High School
 

Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

I’d tell you that I loved the Joffrey Ballet’s new version of The Nutcracker by Tchaikovsky. The classic music still plays in my head and I still envision the brilliant sets of 1892 Chicago and the World’s Fair. I’d love to go back next year.

In my head I’m also hearing Irish accents as I’m watching the sitcom Derry Girls, which is set in Northern Ireland during “The Troubles.”  Who’d expect someone to set a hilarious comedy in a place that’s beset with bombings and violence? Yet Lisa McGee has done just that.

There is a lot of swearing, but if you can get past that, you’ll be treated to a fast-paced lampoon of teenage Catholic girls’ in 1990’s Londonderry.

I started working for the Census helping to recruit 1000 workers for this part of the county. Across the country, they’ll need 1,000,000 people to help finish the census. Something like 25% of people don’t complete the census so the government sends people out into the field to get everyone to finish it. My current position entails getting people to apply at 2020census.gov/jobs .

I’d also share the recipes I got at the Holiday Appetizer program at my library. Chef and instructor Susan Maddox returned with four recipes, which I’ll share soon.

I’ve started reading Scott Adams’ newest book Loserthink, which helps readers understand how slovenly thinking keeps you from seeing things clearly. We all have pet ways of looking at ideas or situations and some of those should be scrapped.

 

Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

If I were having coffee with you this weekend, I would tell you that I’ve gotten confirmed to work for the next operation of the U.S. Census.  I have get to do another background check, but that won’t be a problem.

I thoroughly enjoyed the Downton Abbey film when I saw it with my mother last week. it was entertaining and a film you can see with people of all generations without cringing at language or subject matter. There was a trailer for a new film on the life of Harriet Tubman, which looks promising. It looks like they’ve added steroids to history, but Harriet could be good.

I am disappointed that I haven’t found any time to write. I’ve missed polishing my stories and would like to start a new play. This week, I vow to correct that.

Finally, my former employer from my teaching job in China has agreed to reimburse me for the costs incurred when I had to return to China to get my belongings after they decided not to have me return. I learned that a male colleague in essentially the same situation was reimbursed. It took a while for me to come up with the needed receipts. Now the problem is that they’ve sent me a W2 form, an I-9 and other new hire documents. I mentioned that I’m not being hired and that signing these forms is dishonest. I wasn’t sure what they were doing and still am not. Then a new girl in HR replied that they weren’t responsible for withholding taxes. What?! Withholding on a reimbursement? I’m not getting wages, I’m getting reimbursed for airfare, hotel, etc. Those expenses aren’t taxed. These people should know this. Clark University continues to vex me.

I returned to volunteering in the Makerspace at my hometown library. It was loads of fun. It’s interesting to see how each space differs. In the 7 weeks I’d been gone two of their full timers have left. One got a new job and the other a promotion. They’ll leave a hole in the team even though the others are good.

No word from the two jobs I’d interviewed for. One wanted their new employee to start today. I’m guessing they have offered the job to someone else.

Sepia Saturday

1909.163

This week Sepia Saturday bloggers are transported back to the Gilded Age, to the mills.

6294404287_235fbca88c_c

Saw mill, Ireland, 1901

I wouldn’t want to work here.

7496268698_73d2b849ae_c

Richmond Spring Mills, Tennessee, 1910

How old do you think that young, barefoot mill worker is?

Silk1

Weaving Silk in China

Silk

France 18th Century weaving

Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

If I were having coffee with you this weekend, I would tell you that I had a great weekend working. Well, sort of great. I did hear this horrible information about how cold heartedly my coworker whose mother died has been treated. Yet, because I worked with good teammates the time flew by and everyone pulled together that made things fun.

I had a good birthday with dinner at my aunt and uncle’s new condo that overlooks a small lake. They moved from the home they’ve lived in probably since the 70s, but the stairs were too much for my aunt. We had a great night with lots of laughs.

I started reading a mystery called The Beautiful Blue Death. Set in Victorian London, it reminds me a lot of Sherlock Holmes stories.

I started a gofundme campaign to help defray the costs of my doctor’s visit given that my employer’s error got me kicked off my insurance.

Next Monday is my last day at this library. I’d go back if there was a new Director. This woman is pernicious and inefficient. It’s hard to believe she was ever hired or that she’s kept her job.

I began watching Buster Keaton in Saphead, a sweet comedy with less slapstick than I expected.