Word of the Week

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By Dani Dipirro, 2016

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh not hoo-gah) is a Danish word used when acknowledging a feeling or moment, whether alone or with friends, at home or out, ordinary or extraordinary as cosy, charming or special.

I love this word that’s new to me. I found an audio book entitled “The Little Book of Hygge” at the library by accident. I’m listening to it now and will write a review once I’m finished. For now, take a look at the images below. These are the photos that a search on Flickr.com for hygge.

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Notice all the candles and sheep

Below is an infographic that shows the elements of hygge.

hygge

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Word of the Week

Orthorexia nervosa – eating disorder when a person is obsessed with only eating an extreme healthy diet.

I saw an article in the Jakarta Post describing this condition. So eating vegan or only raw foods can become an obsession and lead to serious health problems.

So a little wheat or chocolate ain’t necessarily bad.

Words of the Week

I just finished reading Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra and have run across several words that aren’t used that much, but have a ring to them. Here are a few:

Vouchsafe: v. to give (something) to someone as a promise or a privilege

Huswife: n. hussy
   I guess now with so many working women, some of which would be hussies, this isn’t needed.

Yare: adj. swift

Forspoke: v. spoke against.

Shakespeare was a genius so he’d have a large vocabulary, but it seems that his audience would have known most of the words he used. Have our vocabularies shrunk? Yes, we use words like computer and telephone, but did they push out words the Bard and his contemporaries knew?

 

Word of the Week

multiloquence, n. Excessive talkativeness or loquaciousness; prolixity.
Pronunciation: Brit. /ˌmʌlˈtɪləkw(ə)ns/,  U.S. /məlˈtɪləkw(ə)ns/
Etymology: <  post-classical Latin multiloquentia (Vetus Latina; translating ancient Greek πολυλογία polylogy n.) <  multi- multi- comb. form + -loquentia -loquence comb. form. Compare earlier multiloquent adj. and multiloquiousness n., multiloquy n.
 Now rare.
1760  ‘J. Copywell’ Shrubs Parnassus 147 Where Clamour wages war with Sense, And Oratory centres in Multiloquence.
1846  J. E. Worcester Universal Dict. Eng. Lang.Multiloquence, quality of being multiloquent; loquacity, talkativeness. [Citing J. Q. Adams.]
1893 Temple Bar 97 625 He would invariably flounder astray in his own multiloquence.
1923 Science 6 Apr. 418/1 Perhaps their silence on this matter, as contrasted with their relative multiloquence on the pedigree culture data, is indicative of a capacity to judge the comparative importance of the facts.
1952 Daily Tel. 23 Jan. 4/6 Multiloquence characterised by a consummate interfusion of circumlocution.

Word of the Week

Here’s a word I’ve never heard before. I wonder if I can get this to be widely used.

ogdoad \OG-doh-ad\ noun
1. the number eight.
2. a group of eight.

Quotes
The monad, [that is,] the one tittle, is therefore, he says, also a decade. For by the actual power of this one tittle, are produced duad, and triad, and tetrad, and pentad, and hexad, and heptad, and ogdoad, and ennead, up to ten. For these numbers, he says, are capable of many divisions, and they reside in that simple and uncompounded single tittle of the iota.
— Hippolytus (170–235), The Refutation of All Heresies, translated by J. H. MacMahon, 1851

Origin
Ogdoad came to English from the Late Latin in the early 1600s and ultimately derives from the Greek ógdoos meaning “eighth.”