Word of the Week

Featherbedding (n.) A labor union practice of artificially increasing the number of workers employed even though the specific job or task can be completed with fewer workers. This can be done mandating that specific jobs be performed only by workers with specific skill levels or be mandating that a certain number of workers are needed to perform a job or task.

References
“Featherbedding” Retrieved from https://glossary.econguru.com/economic-term/featherbedding.

Word of the Week

Cavil verb (used without object), cav·iled, cav·il·ing or (especially Britishcav·illed, cav·il·ling.

to raise irritating and trivial objections; find fault with unnecessarily (usually followed by ator about): He finds something to cavil at in everything I say.

verb (used with object), cav·iled, cav·il·ing or (especially Britishcav·illed, cav·il·ling. to oppose by inconsequential, frivolous, or sham objections: to cavil each item of a proposed agenda.

Word of the Week

Fungible

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Ted Cruz and others used ‘fungible’ this week when talking about the money that was returned to Iran during the Obama administration. Someone asked Cruz whether he could prove that the money returned to Iran was used for terrorism and he said money’s fungible. Since cash goes into one pot that’s then used for various expenses no one can say this particular cash paid for this particular expense. It’s part of the total funds and some of those funds were used to fund terrorism.

Scott Adams praised Cruz for his answer this week, though he thought the word wasn’t used accurately.

Word of the Week

Fetcher bill: n. “legislative bills that would take money from various persons or groups, and then withdraw them once (constitutionally protected) payments are made. These bills go by different names. In California they are called ‘juice bills,’ referring to their ability to squeeze those who would lose from taxation unless they pay up. In Illinois, they are called “fetcher bills,” for their ability to fetch money from otherwise victimized taxpayers who pay to avoid the greater financial pain. ‘Milker’ bills is another term used, for obvious reasons.” Retrieved from A Way with Words at https://www.waywordradio.org/fetcher_bill_1/

I came across this term in Crain’s Chicago Business in an article about politics and how pending legislation, which may never pass, is souring potential businesses from coming to Illinois because there are so many possible drawbacks.

 

Word of the Week

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Dunning-Kruger Effect – a psychological term referring to the instance of people of low ability having the cognitive bias of believing they are more intelligent than others because they can’t understand their own limits and other’s strengths.

I’ve seen this in life, but didn’t know there was a term for it.

Shakespeare described it as follows:

“The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool”
As You Like It

Word of the Week

Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 10.21.47 AMnappuccino: noun. The practice of first sipping some coffee or caffeinated beverage and then taking a power nap in the afternoon. According to Daniel Pink on PBS’ Newshour, this practice packs a one, two punch. You get to snooze, but you don’t lose because the caffeine kicks in and you actually wake up in 20 minute or so.

If you want to see Daniel Pink explain and also describe his book When, which teaches people how to better allocate their time for energy and productivity — and safety, click here.

“What’s this about safety?” you ask. Pink reports that people who have medical procedures in the afternoon are far more likely to suffer from healthcare workers’ mistakes.

 

Word of the Week

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By Dani Dipirro, 2016

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh not hoo-gah) is a Danish word used when acknowledging a feeling or moment, whether alone or with friends, at home or out, ordinary or extraordinary as cosy, charming or special.

I love this word that’s new to me. I found an audio book entitled “The Little Book of Hygge” at the library by accident. I’m listening to it now and will write a review once I’m finished. For now, take a look at the images below. These are the photos that a search on Flickr.com for hygge.

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Notice all the candles and sheep

Below is an infographic that shows the elements of hygge.

hygge