Word of the Week

I came across this word in Henry James’ The Wings of the Dove yesterday. I’m not thrilled with with this book, but since I’m reading it to discuss it with a friend I’m sticking with it. The sentence James uses.

brummagem: (n.) spurious; also : cheaply showy : tawdry

  • a bilious combination of brummagem melodrama and synthetic seascapesJohn McCarten
Reference
Brummagem. (n.d.). Retrieved July 18, 2018, from https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/brummagem

 

Word of the Week

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Not sure if these are fixgigs | Source: R. Bernel on Unsplash.com

Fizgig: noun. A type of firework that makes a loud hissing sound.

 

Word of the Week

In honor of P.G. Wodehouse and his unforgettable character Bertie Wooster:

toddle

verbe

toddled; toddling play \ˈtäd-liŋ, ˈtä-dᵊl-iŋ\

intransitive verb
1: to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child
2: to take a stroll : saunter

toddle

noun

toddled; toddling play \ˈtäd-liŋ, ˈtä-dᵊl-iŋ\

intransitive verb
1: to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child
2: to take a stroll : saunter
I’ll be toddling off now! Cheerio!

Word of the Week

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esprit de l’escalier: wit of the staircase : repartee thought of only too late, on the way home

I learned this on Ash Wednesday during the prayer ceremony I attended. This French phrase is a pithy expression to capture that feeling of suddenly thinking of the perfect response after a conversation is finished and you’re probably back home ruminating on what transpired.

The priest used the phrase in terms of the story between Jesus and the rich, young man who followed all the commandments but turned away from Jesus because he didn’t want to give up all his belongings. In some ways that isn’t a perfect fit, but this phrase sure is useful.

This is the second, or bonus word of the week. I loved two discoveries and didn’t want to possibly forget this phrase.