Word of the Week

anserine

I read this in The Ukimwi Road and looked it up.

anserine: adj. silly or stupid as in “Stop your anserine behavior.”

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Word of the Week

felliflu10551

I like the sound of this word, as well as the look of it written with a flourish above. I discovered fellifluous via my daily emails from Oxford English Dictionary, my all time favorite source for information on words.

I hope you don’t encounter any fellifluous folks this weekend.

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Word of the Week

Fetcher bill: n. “legislative bills that would take money from various persons or groups, and then withdraw them once (constitutionally protected) payments are made. These bills go by different names. In California they are called ‘juice bills,’ referring to their ability to squeeze those who would lose from taxation unless they pay up. In Illinois, they are called “fetcher bills,” for their ability to fetch money from otherwise victimized taxpayers who pay to avoid the greater financial pain. ‘Milker’ bills is another term used, for obvious reasons.” Retrieved from A Way with Words at https://www.waywordradio.org/fetcher_bill_1/

I came across this term in Crain’s Chicago Business in an article about politics and how pending legislation, which may never pass, is souring potential businesses from coming to Illinois because there are so many possible drawbacks.

 

Word of the Week

Petrichor – n. the pleasant smell after a rain fall.

Reference

Petrichor.” (2019). Oxford Dictionary. Retrieved from https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/petrichor on a rainy May 2, 2019.

The video of rain is great if you like falling to sleep to the sound of rain. It goes for hours.

Word of the Week

Eucatastrophe: n. the sudden happy turn in a story which pierces you with a joy that brings tears. Coined by J.R.R. Tolkien.

But the ‘consolation’ of fairy-tales has another aspect than the imaginative satisfaction of ancient desires. Far more important is the Consolation of the Happy Ending. Almost I would venture to assert that all complete fairy-stories must have it. At least I would say that Tragedy is the true form of Drama, its highest function; but the opposite is true of Fairy-story. Since we do not appear to possess a word that expresses this opposite — I will call it Eucatastrophe. The eucatastrophic tale is the true form of fairy-tale, and its highest function.

The consolation of fairy-stories, the joy of the happy ending: or more correctly of the good catastrophe, the sudden joyous “turn” (for there is no true end to any fairy-tale): this joy, which is one of the things which fairy-stories can produce supremely well, is not essentially ‘escapist’, nor ‘fugitive’. In its fairy-tale—or otherworld—setting, it is a sudden and miraculous grace: never to be counted on to recur. It does not deny the existence of dyscatastrophe, of sorrow and failure: the possibility of these is necessary to the joy of deliverance; it denies (in the face of much evidence, if you will) universal final defeat and in so far is evangelium, giving a fleeting glimpse of Joy, Joy beyond the walls of the world, poignant as grief.

It is the mark of a good fairy-story, of the higher or more complete kind, that however wild its events, however fantastic or terrible the adventures, it can give to child or man that hears it, when the “turn” comes, a catch of the breath, a beat and lifting of the heart, near to (or indeed accompanied by) tears, as keen as that given by any form of literary art, and having a peculiar quality.

Retrieved from Tolkien Gateway at http://tolkiengateway.net/wiki/Eucatastrophe