Word of the Week

honeyfuggle

PRONUNCIATION:
(HUN-ee-fuh-guhl)

MEANING:
verb tr., intr.: To deceive or swindle, especially by flattery.

ETYMOLOGY:
Perhaps from honey + fugle (to cheat). Earliest documented use: 1829. Also spelled as honeyfugle.

USAGE:
“Don’t try to honeyfuggle me, Wolf McCloud. I’m not pretty, and we both know it.”
Jane Bonander; Wild Heart; Pocket Books; 1995.

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Word of the Week

http://picasion.com/gl/1MUx/
http://picasion.com/gl/1MUx/

PRONUNCIATION:

skeuomorph (SKYOO-uh-morf)

MEANING:

noun: A design feature copied from a similar artifact in another material, even when not functionally necessary. For example, the click sound of a shutter in an analog camera that is now reproduced in a digital camera by playing a sound clip.

ETYMOLOGY:

From Greek skeuos (vessel, implement) + -morph (form).

NOTES:

A skeuomorph can be employed for various purposes. Since people are used to the click sound of a camera as feedback that the picture has been taken, it is now artificially-produced in digital cameras. Other examples are copper cladding on a zinc penny (for familiarity) and wood finish on a plastic product (for a more expensive look).

USAGE:

“While working two months ago in South Lowestoft, Suffolk, British archaeologist Clare Good excavated a four-sided object made of the mineral jet. It closely matches a geometrically designed gold object found far away at a burial site called Bush Barrow near Stonehenge in Wiltshire. The match is so close that experts believe the black artifact is a skeuomorph, or a copy in a different material.”
Jennifer Viegas; Stonehenge Amulets Worn by Elite; Discovery News; Apr 6, 2007.