I’m Finding this Fascinating

I think every now and then when I get captivated learning something new, or relearning something in a deeper way, I’m going to share it.

I’m in lesson 6 of Hillsdale College’s course on the US Congress and it’s enthralling. I really think this is a must-see for any US citizen and for anyone curious about how our government works.

Now I got an average or maybe above average education on US government in high school as was and still is required, but I didn’t learn about how congress changed through the centuries, about how administrative laws proliferated and how the government had to figure out, through trial and error how new regulations should be made and how the agencies should approve them. I didn’t learn about the powerful Speakers of the House Thomas Brackett Reed or his successor Joseph Gurney Cannon, of whom it could be argued was more powerful than either of the presidents he served.

The professor also shares how the U.K. Parliament’s Question Hour influenced American legislators and others who wanted this sort of give and take. I’ve seen snippets of the Prime Minister’s Questions, but now that I’ve found the Parliament’s YouTube Channel, I’m sure to watch more often.

I urge you to check out Hillsdale’s online courses. They’re free.

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If You Don’t Have Time to Read the Book

Here’s a good summary of Salam’s ideas on immigration, which he explains in his book Melting Pot or Civil War. If you believe in hearing two sides of an issue, Salam should be on your reading list.

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday 452 : 12 January 2019

This week’s prompt challenges us with a photo of a train wreck in Ireland and the workers starting to get things back on track. (Excuse the pun.)

I searched for an array of train photos to fit this theme. Here’s what I discovered.

You can see more Sepia Saturday train photos by clicking here.

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SMU Digital Library, Barclay Road, 1895

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UK National Archives, Northern Line Tain, 1946

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National Archives, Off the Rails, 1868

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Irish Railroad Society, 1959

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Internet Archives, Shanon , PA, 1908

 

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Theme Images - 428  21 July 2018

Hat’s off to hats. For Sepia Saturday I thought I’d see what hats I could find from different countries. I searched through Flickr Commons for these.

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Korea, Source: Cornell University Library, 1904

 

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Japan. Source: National Library of Denmark, 1925

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USA, Internet Archive, circa 1863

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Australian War Memorial collection, 1913

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Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, n.d.

For more Sepia Saturday photos, click here.

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Theme Image  425 - June 2018

So strike up the band! This week Sepia Saturday bloggers are challenged to find and share photos of marching bands. Here’s what I found:

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Jefferson City, Missouri, 1924 | Flickr Commons – Missouri State Archives

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Killybegs Marching Band in Falcarragh, Ireland, 1971 | Flickr Commons – National Library of Ireland

In the description for this photo it says:
The benefits of having a marching band in a town are many and varied, keeping young people active, developing an appreciation of music, giving essential life skills etc.

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High School Students (no information where they’re from) in front of the Rotunda, Arts & Industries Building, Washington, DC | Flickr Commons – Smithsonian Institute.

To see more Sepia Saturday post, click here.

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Theme Image 415

Playing board games has always been a favorite pastime of mine. I especially like backgammon, checkers, and Risk. My family often played Monopoly, but we never finished a game. Fun though they were, the games went on and on.

Here are some nostalgic photos of board games.

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From “Our Domestic Animals,” 1907

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Florida Checkers Championship, 1957

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Australian ship, 1934

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In Japan, the game go is very big. There are movies like March Comes in Like a Lion and television broadcasts of tournaments.

To see more interpretations, click here.