As the Riots Continue

Last night I watched national news coverage of the Protests/Riots across the country, while today I watched more of the local news.

Some immediate thoughts:

  • Everyone I’ve spoken with is unified in their abhorrence of the horrible policeman who killed Mr. George Floyd. That’s the positive. Decades ago this view would not have been widespread.
  • I’m glad that my nephew who lives near the first Target to get torched in Minneapolis is now staying at his roommate’s parents’ house in the suburbs.
  • Last night I was disappointed with how often CNN sympathized with the rioters who clearly weren’t “peaceful protestors.” You could see them lighting things on fire and throwing things and CNN would continue to paint them in a favorable light.
  • I saw on Twitter that three different gangs in Pilsen, Little Village and Back of the Yards told the police that they’d protect their neighborhood businesses. That sure sounds like vigilante justice may be in the offing. I’m not sure whether the police backed down.
  • It’s troubling that so little is known about these people who come from other towns or states to “protest.” I believe some are with Antifa, but who pays them and what other groups are similar? Will designating Antifa, etc. a terrorist group mean that if a person donates to them, they could be arrested? I hope so. 
  • It’s sad to see the videos of Black people imploring white vandals who’re spray painting BLM and such on businesses, imploring them to stop as the graffiti is marring the Black people’s community. These vandals aren’t protesting and they disrespect the woman. They’ll tire of their protest and move back to their hometowns and enjoy their favorite café will look fine.

Thursday Door Challenge

village green door

Hosted by Norm 2.0, Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Click here, to see more links to more doors.

Thursday Door Challenge

 

Hosted by Norm 2.0, Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Click here, to see more links to more doors.

Thursday Door Challenge

IMG_0831

Hosted by Norm 2.0, Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

IMG_0837

I think Chet graduated.

IMG_0825

Looks like a high end Hobbit house

Click here, to see more links to more doors.

Thursday Door Challenge

Hosted by Norm 2.0, Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Click here, to see more links to doors.

Sepia Saturday

2004164

Time for this week’s Sepia Saturday post and a time to take a look back in history. Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers to share images and posts of bygone days. This week we’re inspired to find photos based on the photo above, photos that show healthcare workers.

nurses 1918 stretcher

Source LOC, Washington, DC, 1918

Above Red Cross nurses in Washington, DC

If you’d like to see more of the week’s Sepia Saturday posts, click here to get to the main page.

14780165261_484371efcc_c

Internet  Archives, p 607 of Industrial Medicine and Surgery, 1919

walter reed

LOC, nurse working in Walter Reed Hospital’s Influenza Ward, 1918

can't ride trolley

LOC, Seattle, circa 1918

No mask, no streetcar. In Seattle during the Spanish flu one had to have a face mask if you wanted to get on a streetcar.

3481163841_85fa69fd31_c

Compulsory mask – State Library of New South Wales, 1919

The Flickr Commons entry has this note:

The skull and crossbones on the mask was a joke, not part of the mask as issued, in an attempt to halt the disease. 12,000 died in Australia and between 20-100 million around the world, more than were killed in the War

flu fighters

LOC, Flu Fighters, Montenegro, 1918

Healthcare workers with the American Red Cross. They went to Montenegro to care for small pox and typhus patients. Then the Spanish Flu broke out and brought them more patients.

Sepia Saturday

sepia;ibrary

Time for another Sepia Saturday post, time to take a look back in history. Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers to share images and posts of bygone days. This week we’re inspired to find photos based on the photo above.

I accept this challenge and sought out photos of libraries. This prompt is fitting as it in the US we’re finishing National Library Week.

14401820951_f103e9e51f_c

Stitt Library at BUMED, 1902

From the Navy Medicine Flickr Commons collection, this library had a telescope inside. That’s where the stairs must lead to.

27619568637_f920c29a12_c

National Library of Ireland, circa 1900

7852485970_abe70d5a43_c

Dallas Public Library, circa 1910

From the SMU Library Digital Collection

5748710857_5686c76856_c

In Mudgee, Gulgong, Australia, 1878

From State Library of New South Wales – While I admit I love the elegant, stately libraries of city centers, this simple, rustic library tugs at my heartstrings. I love how this man started a library out in the wilderness.

6329246435_7450cf9057_c

Carnegie Library, Greenville, Texas, 1904

During the late 19th and early 20th century, tycoon Andrew Carnegie built libraries in the US and around the world. If a town applied for the program and promised to maintain a library staff and collection, they could receive funds to build what was then known as a Carnegie Library. Above and below are two examples of the grand libraries.

8113589613_97774e9ba6_c

Carnegie Library, Dallas, 1920