Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Flowing Water

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Tasmania, Australia

 

Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of flowing water.

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Sepia Saturday

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<strong>Floods can be so devastating, yet these kids are making the best of it. Here are some historic floods from Flickr Commons. Click here to see more blogs with Sepia Saturday posts.

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Brisbane, 1893 from State Library of Queensland.

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Lanceton, Tasmania, 1929 from Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office

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Luxor n.d. from NY Public Library</strong>

 

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge

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Sky Blue

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Sky Blue

Silver

Each week Cee of Cee’s Photography challenges bloggers with a fun prompt. This week we’re to find photos of subjects in colors that begin with the letter S (e.g. sepia, steel blue, sapphire, silver, etc.)

If you want to see more Letter S photos, click here.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Ascend

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Tasmania, Australia

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Wednesday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announce
ments, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Just a few wonderful posts:

Tasmania

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Since I have friends in Tasmania, I thought I should hop off the mainland and see what Hobart and its environs had to offer. I discovered that incredible nature and a more relaxed pace abounded in Tasmania.

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Tasmanian Tiger

Here’s what I learned about Tasmania:

  • The Tasmanian Devil is familiar to non-Australians because of the cartoon character but the Tasmanian Tiger was more of the state’s symbol than the former. However, the Tasmanian Tiger has been extinct (or believed to be so — some claim to have seen signs of them) for decades.
  • The tallest flowering tree, the eucalyptus regnans can be found here. The only tree that’s taller is the California redwood.
  • What is now called Tasmania has been inhabited by aborigines for approximated 12,000 years when it was cut off from the mainland.
  • Tasmania was named after Abel Janszoon Tasman, a the Dutch explorer, who saw what is now Tasmania in 1642.

My first full day in Tasmania I went with my friend cum hostess to the Tasmanian National Park, which was swarming with tourists, which is quite uncommon. We saw the Tessellated Pavement, which is an area of flat rock on the ocean. The ocean has cut into the rock over the course of time and what’s unusual about that is that the cuts are at right angles. It looks manmade, but isn’t. We also saw the Remarkable Cave, which is an arch from the land to the ocean, the Blowhole, a natural pool where water shoots up periodically, and lots of gorgeous seascape.

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  • My second day we went to Mt. Field National Park where there’s a rainforest and famed waterfall. This rainforest is home to the eucaluptus regnans.

    We had a great day strolling through Salamanca, the hip part of town by the harbor. (Sorry I can’t find photos.) Salamanca is home to dozens of craft shops, restaurants, bars and cafés.

    Day three was spent at the beach in Dodge’s Ferry, Tasmania. A word to the wise: reapply the sunscreen often. I’m still peeling my sunburned skin off. Still it was a wonderful trip. I want to go back to see Tassie’s funky Museum of Old and New Art (MONA).