Advertisements

Weekly Photo Challenge: Collage

IMG_20170103_113655

A gallery is a collage in a way

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Wednesday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Advertisements

Weekly Photo Challenge: Bridge

IMG_20170102_111000

Sydney Harbor Bridge

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Wednesday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Heritage

DSCN9842

Chishakuin Temple, Kyoto

Harbin 2014 314

St. Sophia Church, Haerbin, China

DSCN0302

Chicago, Illinois

DSC_0135

Beijing, China

Weekly Photo Challenge: Graceful

wp-1485122095459.jpg

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other Weekly Photo Challenge photos:

Weekly Photo Challenge: Graceful

wp-1484419865363.jpg1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other Weekly Photo Challenge photos:

Photos from Sydney

wp-1483619807588.jpg

Indigenous Art at New South Wales National Gallery

wp-1483621508425.jpg

Sculpture at “The Rocks”

wp-1483359897132.jpg

Sydney’s General Post Office (aka GPO)

More From Hyde Park Barracks

wp-1483620268191.jpg

Female Convict clothing and belongings

wp-1483620322623.jpg

Female dormitory, Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney Australia

wp-1483620408392.jpg

Painting of an execution, Hyde Park Barracks Museum

Hyde Park Barracks Museum

screen-shot-2017-01-16-at-5-27-29-pm

To get a good understanding of Australia’s convict history, visit Sydney’s Hyde Park Barracks Museum. An UNESCO World Heritage site, the Hyde Park Barracks Museum shows how the convicts lived in the 19th century.

A Short History

Until the U.S. won the American Revolution, England sent convicts to the American colonies. After the U.S. became independent, England had to find a new place to get rid of its convicts and with the recent exploration of Australia, that became the place.

At first convicts could live wherever they liked, but in the early 19th century the governor of Australia figured it would be better to put them in barracks. In 1819 the Hyde Park Barracks was completed and opened.

Over the years it was used to house convicts, Irish orphans, and poor women before becoming a court house. (For more history see: http://sydneylivingmuseums.com.au/hyde-park-barracks-museum)

The Museum

The Hyde Park Barracks museum is a bright, well curated museum offering well designed exhibits that provide facts and narratives so that visitors get a good grounding in the history from a wide and personal perspective. You’ll learn about Bennelong, an aboriginal man who was friends with Australia’s first governor, Arthur Phillip and about a woman who managed the women’s dormitory while raising 14 children.

When you pay for your ticket, the clerk will offer you a free audio guide in the language of your choice, this guide enhanced the experience giving still more interesting insights into the history.

wp-1483620374570.jpg

Bennelong – far right

Admission: Adults $12, Families $30, Concession (not sure what that means) $8

Novotel: Central Sydney

 

For its downtown location and good price, I chose to stay at Novotel’s Central Sydney. I’ve been happy with the size of room and the modern bathroom and stylish room. It was just an 8 minute walk from the train station.

My first night I tried to order room service, but no one would answer the phone. It wasn’t a huge problem. I decided to eat in the restaurant and my fettuccini with sun dried tomatoes was great and could have served two easily.

 

Sepia Saturday

This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt featured Dinah Shore and Burt Bacharach playing tennis, my favorite summer sport. It’s inspired me to search the archives of Flickr where I found the photo below of two Australian women women and a Japanese naval officer in tennis attire. Not sure if they’re about to play or finished. The photo captures the ease and elegance of tennis in that era.

I love the women’s tennis attire

Source: Australian National Maritime Museum, which provides this background information:

Members of the Imperial Japanese Naval Squadron visited Australia in January 1924 as part of a training cruise. The squadron consisted of the IWATE, ASAMA and YAKUMO. Nearly 2,500 men of which 300 were midshipmen spent time in Sydney, Melbourne, Hobart, Brisbane, Adelaide and Perth during their tour. Two unidentified women are shown here at Victoria Barracks in Paddington, Sydney. The event was a tennis party, held on the morning of 26 January for the foreign visitors which included Admiral Saito.

Disclaimer

Dear Fellows, The State Department has requested that any Fellows who maintain their own blog or website please post the following disclaimer on your site: "This website is not an official U.S. Department of State website. The views and information presented are the English Language Fellows' own and do not represent the English Language Fellow Program or the U.S. Department of State." We appreciate your cooperation. Site Meter
%d bloggers like this: