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Travel Theme: Names

Chicago, train 027

Downtown Chicago

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Not backwards, that’s the name in Jinan, China

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Café, Pekanbaru, Indonesia

In response to Ailsa’s prompt this week, I’m sharing photos with names.

What does Names make you think of? If you fancy exploring the unfamiliar, exotic and unknown for this week’s travel theme (everyone’s welcome!) here’s what to do:

  1. Create your own post and title it Travel Theme: Names
  2. Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
  3. Watch out for the next travel theme which will come out next weekend
  4. Don’t forget to subscribe to keep up to date on the latest weekly travel themes.
  5. Sign up via the email subscription link in the sidebar or RSS.
    ❤ Ailsa of Where’s My Backpack?
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Weekly Photo Challenge: Alphabet

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts.

Other great photos:

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Header

This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt inspired me to search for images of old cafeterias. Flickr Commons had quite a few.

Source: Vancouver Public Library, 1950

Source: Vancouver Public Library, 1950

I love signs so the one above is a favorite.

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Circa 1943

But then I also like pie, so I wanted to share this one from the Oregon State University special collection caught my eye. The one below shows WWI soldiers and a few civilians in 1918. And the final image is a postcard for a cafeteria. If you want to see more Sepia Saturday posts, click here.

Cornell University, circa 1918

Cornell University, circa 1918

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Signs

Jinan China, college campus

Jinan China, college campus (I’m not sure of his point)

If you have any interpretations of the quotation above, please share them in the comments box. I’d be most grateful to hear what people think.

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced. 2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag. 3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other great photos:

Old Library Signs

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Homework: Graphic Design

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It’s the second to last week of my Library User Experience class. We looked at signs in libraries. Some can be so stern and off-putting. Our challenge was to make signs that were effective, but not off putting.

For my graphic re-design [of a library sign], I thought I’d do one of the signs at my university in China. Above you see the English translation of a sign that explains the librarians’ duties. It’s hard to read, which is a big problem, so I’ll list the duties below with a bit of editing to make the language concise:

  1. To be devoted to the post and serve the readers wholeheartedly.
  2. To receive and allocated the books for storage in the library, and do some work such as counting, shelving, mending, culling and [illegible].
  3. To make statistics and analyze circulation. provide feedback to the head librarian and acquisitions department.
  4. To arrange the books on the shelves according to classification numbers and to guide the students to read books in the right area.
  5. To orient the freshmen to the library and to suggest books to students.
  6. To clean the tables, chairs, bookshelves and other things.
  7. To be responsible for the use, management and repair of [illegible] in the area.
  8. To be responsible for water and electricity. To close all the doors and check the windows before closing the library.
  9. To return lost or forgotten items over to the office.
  10. To help readers copy materials for learning.
  11. To fill in the duty diary for shift work.
  12. To do other duties as assigned.

This sign contains “everything but the kitchen sink.” It’s long and no one wants to read the sign, which contains items that aren’t important to patrons.

Yet in China libraries went through and to an extent are in a dark age. During and after the Cultural Revolution going to the library was dangerous or taboo. School libraries aren’t used much in K-12, they’re mainly for show. Thus students arrive to university with little experience with libraries or librarians. Signs explaining how librarians can help students would serve patrons.

Rather than putting all the information on one sign, I propose putting a few signs that each state one way librarians can serve students. First signs with three important services would appear throughout the library. Then a few more signs with different messages would appear.  I suggest beginning with signs on reference service, readers recommendations, and instructional services. More signs can be added. I advise posting a few signs as the librarians aren’t highly trained. So the signs should be added in concert with professional development. For example, train the librarians on reference skills and then put up a sign about it.

I’ve designed a few signs in English and Chinese, using Google Translate, which probably isn’t accurate, but shows how a different font and writing system would look.  I wanted to use better fonts, align text for easier reading, incorporate a visual that makes the sign come to life.

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I found my images on Storybird.com. I would prefer to find appropriate images by the same artist or even more similar in style.

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Sepia Saturday

signs sep

I love signs. They offer such possibilities. Here’s a few that caught my eye.

imperfect

I really like the message in this sign.

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This sign made me smile.

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I liked the handwritten sign.

Check out more delightful old signs at Sepia Saturday.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge

signs

sign french

Cee chose signs for this week’s challenge. Here are two I saw at a temple in Phnom Penh in February, seems so long ago.

What wisdom would you put on a sign?

Unredeemable

This makes me feel worse about not recycling.

Disclaimer

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