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Shopping at Shanghai’s Fake Market

How to bargain in Shanghai. He does a good job and you should bargain hard as he does. I much prefer Beijing’s markets, particularly the Pearl Market to where he’s gone.

If you want to see more, check out this one below.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Wanderlust

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Shanghai

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Outside of Melbourne

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Kyoto, Japan

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other themed photos:

Weekly Photo Challenge: Shadowed

a shadowed stupa in Thailand

a shadowed stupa in Thailand

Chinese vessel painted in shadows

Chinese vessel painted in shadows

Shadowed figure in Zibo

Shadowed figure in Zibo

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog <strong>(a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced. 2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag. 3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other great photos:

Weekly Photo Challenge: Reflection

Suzhou, China

Suzhou, China

Shanghai, China

Shanghai, China

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other great photos:

Shanghai Art Museum

I visited the Shanghai Art Museum in December. The day I went only one exhibit was open, but since the museum is free, I went in. I liked paintings by Peng Cainian, though I’d say these seemed more like “living room art” than like fine art. That’s not necessarily bad.

The exhibit’s introduction noted that when China first opened up, painters blindly leapt on Western art techniques. Cainian took a more thoughtful, meditative, careful approach. Cainian favors quiet aestetics and now focuses on ancient Chinese art in his work. I did like these paintings of ancient artifacts and landscapes and I don’t always want to see art that’s political or cutting edge.

Dreams of Joy

In Lisa See’s Dreams of Joy, the sequel to her historical fiction novel, Shanghai Girls, an idealistic Chinese American college student runs off to China in the late 1950s after learning that her aunt is really her mother and vice versa. Likewise the man she thought was her father isn’t. She’s grown up in a web of lies. On top of that, her stepfather recently committed suicide as his immigration status was fraudulent and the FBI started asking him questions.

So Joy steals her mother’s savings and heads to find her biological dad in Shanghai. Soon her stepmother Pearl follows her rightly fearing that Joy doesn’t know what she’s getting into.

While the plot sounds like a soap opera, the story is absorbing and well told. The characters are well defined and the plot unfolds credibly. Joy starts off in Shanghai and soon finds her father, an artist who’s volunteered to teach peasants at the Green Dragon Commune to get out of some political trouble.

The novel shifts from Joy’s to Pearl’s narration so readers can see experiences from two different vantage points – the young newcomer and the Overseas Chinese returnee.

I found the narrative a detailed, convincing glimpse into the era of the Great Leap Forward with its deprivations, idealization of the proletariat, petty power struggles and denunciations. See provides a section at the end of the book explaining aspects of the story and their history. Her acknowledgements not only thank the experts, who helped her, but allow the reader to see the extent of her research.

In many ways the book reminded me of Wild Swans, a non-fiction work mainly about the Cultural Revolution. Both show how women of different generations cope during hellish circumstances.

I enjoyed Dreams of Joy, but felt the ending was a little too pat and happy. I think in reality someone readers had come to root for would have suffered greatly. Also, since May, Pearl’s sister was important to Joy, Pearl and Z.G., Joy’s father, it was strange that she figured so little at the end.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Close

Close up of UK’s Seed Cathedral, World Expo 2012

Seeds of Seed Cathedral

Another Seed Cathedral close-up

In 2010 I got to go to the World Expo in Shanghai. The pavilions each country made were spectacular. The United Kingdom created a Seed Cathedral sort of a cubic porcupine with encased seeds on each spike. I enjoyed it, but thought it was more of an art exhibit that an exhibit of the UK. Still it was widely popular with three hour waiting lines in the heat of July and August.

Exterior of UK’s Seed Cathedral

New to The Daily Post? Whether you’re a beginner or a professional, you’re invited to get involved in our Weekly Photo Challenge to help you meet your blogging goals and give you another way to take part in Post a Day / Post a Week. Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

Here’s how it works:

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use a “postaday2012″ or “postaweek2012″ tag.

3. Subscribe to The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements. Sign up via the email subscription link in the sidebar or RSS.

More Art from the 1893 World’s Fair

Artist: Curran, Machinery Hall

I went to the 2010 Shanghai World Exhibition and though it was splendid, it didn’t compare. How could it?

Canal

Old Vienna

Plan of the Colombian Exposition, 1893

From the Archives: A Weekend in Shanghai

I really liked Shanghai. Even though it rained on Saturday all day, I had fun. I stayed at quite a good, inexpensive hotel. I got a room for just $47/night. Find that in New York or Chicago.

I went to the Shanghai Museum and walked around first. Then I went to the Ritz Carleton Hotel for high tea. You would have loved it. They had a group of Chinese women playing beautiful traditional music. Ahh . . .

I did more exploring, but the rain limited me. I tried to buy a camera thinking in the big city they’d speak English better. Well, the prices were 40% more than I found in Jinan. I’ll wait to get a digital camera till Scofield can take me. I guess I saw the origins of the expression “Shanghai-ed.”

The next day it was sunny and I went to church, a Buddhist temple and then the French Concession where there were tree lined streets, old European style architecture and cute shops. I just had lunch at Starbucks. (With Chinese food, the menu can be a problem as can the fact that the food is designed to be eaten by several people.) I got some pottery.

Then I saw two small museums both restored old houses. I liked seeing the beautiful old furnishings.

I met Eva, my new colleague Adrienne’s friend, for dinner. She was a teacher and now has her own business finding apartments for expats. She’s under 30 and Chinese. Very cheerful. I was a bit unsure about having dinner with someone I really didn’t know, but Eva was quite nice.

The last day I walked around Old Shanghai where there were so many people trying to sell fake designer watches and bags. Then I went to the Bund where there is a lot of construction. Lots of dust and noise.

Soon I’ll have pictures. I just have to get them developed and get a CD. I tried that nearby and they don’t do it. I hope downtown they will.

Disclaimer

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