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Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday 343 Footer

Each week Sepia Saturday bloggers post images and text on a particular theme. This week the theme is Work & Play. Flickr Commons has numerous photos of people who worked hard in mines, mills, factories, farms and more. Here’s just a few.

You might ask, “Where’s the play?” Well, my searching didn’t yield much. Life was hard in the early 20th Century.

I bet some did find good Work and Play images.

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Irish Mill, Waterford, 1901

If you want to see more of this week’s posts, go to Sepia Saturday.

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U.S. South, Farmers, circa 1900

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Sepia Saturday

Unknown Man Walking

This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt is of a man walking down a city street.

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This photo shows members of the Pennsylvania delegation of the Republican party walking into the national convention held in Chicago in 1912 according to the Library of Congress. I’m wondering how and why women attended since they couldn’t vote in an election till 1920.

To see more Sepia Saturday photos, click here.

 

Sepia Saturday

sepia july 2

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Source: National Library of Ireland

I found a group portrait on the National Library of Ireland’s Flickr Commons’ page. The photo was taken in December, 1924.

What do you think of their costumes?

You can see more Sepia Saturday photos here.

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Header

This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt shows multiple images of a baby. It’s the sort of wallet sized sheet of photos we’d order at school.

I thought I’d run with multiple births, not quite repetitious, but close in a fascinating way.

How’d you like to be the parent of  twins or triplets? Quadruplets (none shown) or quintuplets?

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Texas State Archives, “Tom & Cullen,” n.d.

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Nationaal Archief Nederlands, n.d.

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Dunda Museum & Archives, n.d.

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Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Header

Sepia Saturday Header

Row, row, row your boat gently down the stream . . .

This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt led me to seek out row boating photos from the archives of Flickr Commons.

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Above a lass named Mary Price is out for a row with a young man near Eastpoint, Florida. Florida Memory dates the image between 1898 and 1912.7680378546_b7f30e7234_z (1)

The Australian National Maritime Museum is looking for help dating and placing this photo. Anyone who can help, please click here.

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Above is the Stanford University crew rowing on the Hudson River between 1900 and 1915. The image is from the Library of Congress.

 

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Header

This week’s Sepia Saturday inspires bloggers to search through archives and find photos on travel, overcrowding, blankets or I’d say carriages. Though kids are back at school, September’s a good month for traveling. My aunt and uncle are soon off to Russia and other friends are off to Wyoming. I’ll leave for China on Thursday so travel came to mind.

Source: Tyne & Wear Museums

Source: Tyne & Wear Museums (n.d.)

How romantic the life of circus performers on the road must have been back then.

Source: National Library of Ireland, circa 1890

Source: National Library of Ireland, circa 1890

Above is a ferry, so the journey’s not long. It carries dock workers.

Source: LOC, circa 1912

Source: LOC, circa 1912

The last photo was taken at a train station, I’m not sure where, but somewhere in the US.

Click here to see more Sepia Saturday posts.

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Header

This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt inspired me to find some photos of pigs, farms

If you want to see more blogger’s Sepia Saturday photos, click here.

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National Archives U.K., (n.d.) Ontario, Canada

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From Tyne & Wear Archives.

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National Archive U.K., World War One

Sepia Saturday

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This weeks’s Sepia Saturday prompt is a typewriter. As much as I love computers, there’s something romantic about old typewriters. While I wouldn’t buy one or in most cases prefer to use one, if I found my old one, I’d keep it and probably use it to type envelopes or possibly a letter.

Yet as the video above shows, a lot of kids have little idea of how to type with one since they’ve only seen them in old movies.

Selectric

Selectric

I remember that my aunt had a Selectric typewriter and I thought that was “the coolest,” so “easy” to correct mistakes.

typewriter

My first typewriter looked a lot like this.

To see more photos inspired by this week’s prompt, go to Sepia Saturday.

My first

Sepia Saturday

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Tunnels are perfect devices for storytelling, seemingly neutral spaces that can lead someone from one world to another. They can also look rather cool and evoke mystery and adventure. The ones I’ve found for Sepia Saturday, though older, have a sci fi vibe to them. I can envision them in Doctor Who or a retro sci fi movie along the lines of Things to Come. To see more Sepia Saturday posts, click here.

Source: Tyne & Wear, Flickr Commons

Source: Tyne & Wear, Flickr Commons

Swiss Guard Tunnel, 1910 Source: Flickr Commons, Library of Congress

Swiss Guard Tunnel, 1910
Source: Flickr Commons, Library of Congress

Source: Tyne & Wear Archives

Source: Tyne & Wear Archives

Sepia Saturday

sepia baking

This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt serves to inspire bloggers to find photos of baking. What a great subject!

I found several on Flickr Commons. If you want to see other blogger’s offerings, click here.

I can't resist old packaging

I can’t resist old packaging

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In Wales (n.d.)

Source: Mennonite Church, USA, 1951

Source: Mennonite Church, USA, 1951

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