Fantastic Fiction

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I just learned about a phenomenal website for readers who love fiction. It’s Fantastic Fiction and it’s a treasure trove containing an exhaustive amount of content on authors and books of all genres. Genres featured include everything from mysteries and sagas to urban literature and paranormal romance.

You can find new books by looking at books your favorite authors have suggested or by looking at what other users viewed that view one of your favorite books.

Librarians use is extensively when they suggest books.

Fantastic Fiction was started as a hobby and now a full time business for Dave Wand and his small crew.

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Word of the Week

Bibliophagist n. : an avid or voracious reader

I’d never herd this word until I clicked on one of the blogger’s profile photos who liked yesterday’s post. What an apt word. I sure admire her vocabulary.

Sample sentences:

Like many bibliophagists, Dirda sometimes has an excessively romantic view of the power of the page. —Kirkus Reviews, 1 Mar. 2006

Once you had got through Pooh and Dr. Dolittle, Alice and the Water Babies, you were a bibliophagist on the loose. —Nadine Gordimer, Telling Times: Writing and Living, 1954–2008, 2010

Reference

Bibliophagist. (n.d.). https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bibliophagist retrieved on August 31, 2018

Dyslexic Fonts on eBooks

I discovered that eBook services commonly offered by public libraries have fonts you can choose that help people with dyslexia read. These fonts’ letters are heavier on the bottom. Researchers have found that this makes reading easier for those with dyslexia.

I wanted to share how people can get these fonts so I made a short video using Adobe’s Spark and Screencast-o-matic. You can do quite a bit with their free features.

Please share this information so more can use it.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Books or Paper

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Each week Cee of Cee’s Photography challenges bloggers with a fun prompt. This week we’re to find photos of subjects that depict busy or working people.

If you want to see more fun photos, click here.

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My 2018 Reading Challenge

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I’ve made up a reading challenge for myself. I have done Goodreads.com‘s challenges where I read a certain number of books per month. This time I’m adding some themes and other specifics to spice things up.

Susan’s 2018 Reading Challenge

January – read a memoir and another book that’ll help me change my outlook (i.e. achieve a resolution)

February – read a 19th century novel and a religious book (for Lent)

March – read a book written by a Russian author

April – read a play by Shakespeare and commentary in a Norton Classic edition

May – read a detective story

June – read a book of historical fiction

July – read a travel book

August – read a humorous book

September – read a book by a Japanese author

October – read something scary

November – read a book a friend has recommended

December – read a children’s book and a story or book with a Christmas theme

 

No one has to join this, but you’re free to do so.

I am curious about what sort of challenge you’d set for yourself. Share in the comment section below.

What is Great Books?

One of the most influential experiences in my life was my parents putting me in Junior Great Books. It made me learn to read difficult books and to look more deeply at literature and essays.

Now I’m thankful that Northbrook Public Library offers a monthly Great Books Discussion group. I’ve gone when I can in recent years. Currently we have an exceptional leader who provides excellent background information and keeps us on track. The group includes brilliant people who share perceptive comments and ask intriguing questions that help and challenge me not just as a reader, but as a person.

If you can, give Great Books a try.

How to Read More

With so many To Be Read (TBR) books, I would like to know how to accomplish this. I feel I haven’t read as much this year as in the past. Yes, it’s been a topsy turvy year so that’s one reason.

Also, I haven’t taken the train as much. Whenever I go into the city on the train I get a good chunk of reading done. I always bring 2 or 3 books to switch them up.