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Oil Paintings

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dscn4046Last weekend there was an oil painting biennial exhibit at the National Art Gallery of China. Plenty to see. Some I liked others looked like something anyone could slop together. That’s modern art for you.

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Any favorites? Comment below.

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Word of the Week

waywiser, n. [‘ An instrument for measuring and indicating distance travelled, esp. by road; spec. a pedometer or odometer. Now hist.’]
Pronunciation: Brit. /ˈweɪˌwʌɪzə/, U.S. /ˈweɪˌwɑɪzər/
Forms: 16– waywiser, 17–18 waywizer.

Origin:Formed within English, by derivation. Etymons: way n.1, wise v.1, -er suffix1.
Etymology: < way n.1 + wise v.1 + -er suffix1, although the semantic motivation in sense 1 is unclear.

In sense 2 probably after German Wegweiser (Middle High German wegewīser); compare Dutch wegwijzer (Middle Dutch wechwiser), and also Swedish vägvisare (18th cent. or earlier), Danish vejviser (Old Danish weye wiisser), all denoting a person or object that shows the way (literally or figuratively); compare earlier way-post n. at way n.1 and int.1 Compounds 3.

1. An instrument for measuring and indicating distance travelled, esp. by road; spec. a pedometer or odometer. Now hist.
In quot. 1801: fig.

1651 R. Child Large Let. in S. Hartlib Legacie 80, I say 20. Ingenuities have been found even in our dayes, as Watches, Clocks, Way-wisers, [etc.].

1801 Monthly Mag. 12 98 It is with the spying-glass of conjecture, not with the way-wiser of record, that the bearing of their sources must be made out.

1802 Port Folio (Philadelphia) 17 July 223/2 The improved pedometer, or waywiser, which when worn in the pocket, ascertains the distance the wearer walks.

1969 G. E. Evans Farm & Village xiv. 148 This device works on the same principle as the measuring wheel used by the old road surveyors—a trundle wheel or way-wiser.

2011 B. Johnson Johnson’s Life of London 97 He [sc. Robert Hooke] was to be a familiar figure, striding around the ruins with his ‘waywiser’, his own invention for measuring distances.

Leaving?

I’m supposed to get my passport and visa tomorrow. I had emailed my supervisor asking to get Sunday delivery for my passport if it came today. I proposed that if my passport arrived on Saturday, I could get the airline ticket to China and get reimbursed. That way I could arrive on Monday and teach Tuesday and Wednesday so I wouldn’t have to make up so many classes (twelve hours). That part of my email was ignored in the first response.

I have been busy today rather than just sitting at home waiting to go to China. After a trip to the bank, yoga and lunch with a friend, I got home and saw another response to my email that said the supervisor, who’s very strict Monday-Friday in his hours would book my travel on Monday. Ugh. I’d leave on Tuesday and now there are no seats available on direct flights. So I’m looking at a 45 hour journey via Korea, Taiwan or Western China (Chengdu).

None of these options are inviting. By Monday there will be less options.

At least there’s an end insight to this saga.

What will I do?

Well, like Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau is known to have said, “Just watch me.”

 

Art Institute: America 1930s

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American Cubism

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I got down to the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit of American Art from the 1930s. With the financial crash of 1929, the ’30s or Great Depression was a time when people thought the American “experiment” had failed. Artists addressed this question. Some, like Grant Wood, focused on a romanticized view of rural life, others looked at the city and some painted bleak dystopian scenes.

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by Grant Wood

Silent Sunday

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Sepia Saturday

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Each week Sepia Saturday bloggers post images and text on a particular theme. This week the theme is Work & Play. Flickr Commons has numerous photos of people who worked hard in mines, mills, factories, farms and more. Here’s just a few.

You might ask, “Where’s the play?” Well, my searching didn’t yield much. Life was hard in the early 20th Century.

I bet some did find good Work and Play images.

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Irish Mill, Waterford, 1901

If you want to see more of this week’s posts, go to Sepia Saturday.

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U.S. South, Farmers, circa 1900

Still Waiting

Should I give up hoping to get to China by Sunday the 4th?

Rather than sending the paperwork she got back from Immigration to my employer via an overnight express, this woman who’s done the job for years, emailed the teachers for their addresses expecting us to take the paperwork to a local consulate which we’ve never done. (In Hefei, the other site of a program did the same thing and unfortunately, the teacher complied. His paperwork is on its way to Arizona, where there is no consulate. He’ll just have to ship it all to Massachusetts.)

So she wasted Monday causing another precious day to be wasted. I emailed her to find out what day of entry to put on our forms for our paperwork and was told Sept 13th! Luckily, when I asked the woman in China who’s in charge of this, she said if we put Sept. 13th as our date of entry we would be able to enter before then.

Fingers crossed.

I better also say some prayers to be safe.

Limbo

Though classes start on September 5, none of the teachers going to China have their tickets to Jinan and the English teachers don’t have visas. There’s some unspecified delay in China. The office staff waited till August to do the paperwork on their end. Monday we were told it was submitted (no date was given) and that it will take two weeks there to get it done.

After that they’ll send it to Massachusetts. Then we’ll be asked to send overnight our forms and passports. Then these items get sent to the embassy in New York. I hope they’ll expedite the process so they’re done overnight. Then everything will have to be sent back to us from Massachusetts. Then we’ll get our airline tickets. I’d love to leave late next week.

The woman in China in charge of this says there’s no problem as we can make up the classes. The two teachers will teach 24 hours per week. Whoever teachers with that sort of schedule have had to make up classes (one because her father died, the other because his wife gave birth to a still born baby) at night. So they taught from 8 am to noon and 2pm to 4pm and then from 7:30 pm to 9:30pm and then the next day at 8 am. They had to do that Monday to Thursday for three weeks or more.

I have no interest in teaching such long days. Usually, I plan and grade at night and my days are plenty long. The other option would be to teach on the weekend. Neither of these options appeal to the students. I hate how the students and teachers are stuck in the middle and how no one will offer an apology or sympathy.

For College Success

Joan Keem offers good advice for advice for new and continuing college students.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Fun

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1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other themed photos:

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Disclaimer

Dear Fellows, The State Department has requested that any Fellows who maintain their own blog or website please post the following disclaimer on your site: "This website is not an official U.S. Department of State website. The views and information presented are the English Language Fellows' own and do not represent the English Language Fellow Program or the U.S. Department of State." We appreciate your cooperation. Site Meter
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