Sepia Saturday

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Dance is this week’s Sepia Saturday theme and I have found all kinds of different dances and dancers. Enjoy!

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Dancing in an Egyptian Tomb, National Archives of Estonia, 1910

I’m not convinced that’s a real tomb.

Ruth St. Denis (above) was an early pioneer of modern dance. She taught Martha Graham.

You can see more dancing posts by clicking here.

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Japanese high school girls learning to dance – 1926

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Midsummer Dance, Swedish Heritage Board, 1931

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VFW Hall Dance, US National Archives, 1946

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Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Tables & Chairs

Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of tables and chairs. 

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Sepia Saturday

1809C-38This week’s nostalgic prompt challenges bloggers to find images of things that are falling. To see more fallen images, click here.

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Waterfall, Powerhouse Museum, Flickr Commons, 1910

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Frank Lloyd Wright, Fallingwater, Public Domain, Pixabay

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Frozen waterfall, Shaanxi, China, Smithsonian, Flickr Commons, n.d.

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Steps

Stairs Wingspread

Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of stairs, either inside or out. I’ve chosen a photo of the stairs inside Wingspread, a Frank Lloyd Wright home in Racine, Wisconsin.

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Poem of the Week

To the Sea

To step over the low wall that divides
Road from concrete walk above the shore
Brings sharply back something known long before—
The miniature gaiety of seasides.
Everything crowds under the low horizon:
Steep beach, blue water, towels, red bathing caps,
The small hushed waves’ repeated fresh collapse
Up the warm yellow sand, and further off
A white steamer stuck in the afternoon—
Still going on, all of it, still going on!
To lie, eat, sleep in hearing of the surf
(Ears to transistors, that sound tame enough
Under the sky), or gently up and down
Lead the uncertain children, frilled in white
And grasping at enormous air, or wheel
The rigid old along for them to feel
A final summer, plainly still occurs
As half an annual pleasure, half a rite,
As when, happy at being on my own,
I searched the sand for Famous Cricketers,
Or, farther back, my parents, listeners
To the same seaside quack, first became known.
Strange to it now, I watch the cloudless scene:
The same clear water over smoothed pebbles,
The distant bathers’ weak protesting trebles
Down at its edge, and then the cheap cigars,
The chocolate-papers, tea-leaves, and, between
The rocks, the rusting soup-tins, till the first
Few families start the trek back to the cars.
The white steamer has gone. Like breathed-on glass
The sunlight has turned milky. If the worst
Of flawless weather is our falling short,
It may be that through habit these do best,
Coming to the water clumsily undressed
Yearly; teaching their children by a sort
Of clowning; helping the old, too, as they ought.

Tom’s SCREWTAPE contribution to F&F — Focusing on Film

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See below to find my Act One friend’s clever contribution to a C.S. Lewis’ publication. I love how he writes about all aspects of social media and the news’ effect on us.

Here’s the “Screwtape” article I wrote for “Fellowship and Fairydust.”

via Tom’s SCREWTAPE contribution to F&F — Focusing on Film

Beijing Bicycle

Based on the classic Bicycle Thieves, (1948)  Beijing Bicycle (2001) has some funny moments, some touching moments and shows the local color of the hutong neighborhood of Dongcheng, but I just couldn’t watch the whole thing.

I got the DVD from the library and had no idea that it was a Chinese version of Vittorio De Sica’s earlier film. At first this story of a poor boy who comes to the big city and gets a job as a messenger pulled me in. His boss hires several new messengers and they get nifty uniforms and new bikes which they can buy once they work a certain amount. His one friend in the city, tells him this is a really good job. Yet it’s not easy to keep it. There’s plenty of trouble getting across this labyrinth of a city and dealing with hard to find customers.

As in the original, just as the boy’s about to own the bike, he comes out of an office and it’s gone. He looks high and low and it’s been stolen. It’s catastrophic.

I sympathized with the hero when his bike was stolen. I was impressed by his perseverance in tracking down the bike (though in a city as vast and populous as modern Beijing, I didn’t entirely buy that). But after watching scene after scene when the boy’s beaten by the thuggish friends of a kid whom he found with the bike. This other boy’s dad had promised him a bike, but then tells him he couldn’t buy the bike because his younger sister has tested into a good school so the father decides to use the money for her tuition. This second boy, who attends a private school, where his pals are all wealthier. They all have bikes. So this kid steals from his father and buys the bike at a second hand bike shop. There’s a lot of conflict over the bike and the hero is beaten and harassed by the second boy’s thuggish friends.

Eventually, I reached a point where I couldn’t take any more of the film. I couldn’t imagine a way for the film to end and satisfy me. It was a portrait of a society or sub-culture of people with no morals. Everyone learns that the second boy stole money to buy this bike, yet his pals still beat the other kids and hold him hostage for hours. I reached a point where if felt like punishment.