Sepia Saturday

California Historical Society : Sepia Saturday Theme Image 418

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Union Station,Chicago

There’s no dining room or lunch counter in the station anymore, but Union Station has remodeled some lounges to return their old glory.

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The Berghoff Restaurant

This Chicago establishment is still in business, though on a smaller scale. I’ve been here a few times with my father. If you’re in the Loop, it’s worth a try.

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Marshall Field’s Walnut Room, Gilded Age

Marshall Field’s department story was “the” Chicago place to shop. It’s where Harry Selfridge got his start and Field was a great innovator in retail and a real estate mogul. (For much of his career he was the richest man in Chicago. Books have been written about Marshall Fields’ professional and personal life. He’s been featured in some novels. In Prairie Avenue he’s represented by Mr. Kennerly.)

My grandmother would take my siblings and I to Marshall Fields for lunch and shopping. We’d either eat in the Walnut Room or the Narcissus Room, where I loved to watch the gold fish in the fountain. 

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The fountain had goldfish

The menu’s highlights were it’s Field’s salad and hot fudge sundae, which what I’d still say is the best chocolate sauce ever.

To see more Sepia Saturday posts, click here.

Did your grandparents take you to eat anywhere special?

Mary Tyler Moore

Mary Tyler Moore, a paragon of excellence, died this week. I saw her on the Dick Van Dyke Show and later The Mary Tyler Moore Show, where she blossomed. Her work, comedy and drama, was high caliber, always high caliber. I miss that. She showed that you can entertain without stooping to the lowest common denominator. Above is an interview with another TV great, Johnny Carson.

Thanks to Eva, for sharing this clip of Mary on Sesame Street in Isreal. I love how approachable she is and how she’s able to connect with the girl and laugh at herself. The essence of good comedy.

Isn’t it nice to know she liked cheeseburgers and could laugh at herself.

Sepia Saturday

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Sepia Saturday Header

Row, row, row your boat gently down the stream . . .

This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt led me to seek out row boating photos from the archives of Flickr Commons.

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Above a lass named Mary Price is out for a row with a young man near Eastpoint, Florida. Florida Memory dates the image between 1898 and 1912.7680378546_b7f30e7234_z (1)

The Australian National Maritime Museum is looking for help dating and placing this photo. Anyone who can help, please click here.

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Above is the Stanford University crew rowing on the Hudson River between 1900 and 1915. The image is from the Library of Congress.

 

Sepia Saturday

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This weeks’s Sepia Saturday prompt is a typewriter. As much as I love computers, there’s something romantic about old typewriters. While I wouldn’t buy one or in most cases prefer to use one, if I found my old one, I’d keep it and probably use it to type envelopes or possibly a letter.

Yet as the video above shows, a lot of kids have little idea of how to type with one since they’ve only seen them in old movies.

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Selectric

I remember that my aunt had a Selectric typewriter and I thought that was “the coolest,” so “easy” to correct mistakes.

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My first typewriter looked a lot like this.

To see more photos inspired by this week’s prompt, go to Sepia Saturday.

My first

Poem of the Week

Wherever You Are

by Jeffrey Harrison

When I kissed you in the hall
of the youth hostel we fell
into the linen closet laughing
twenty years ago and I still
remember though not very often
the taste of cheap wine in your mouth
like raspberries the freckle
between your breasts and the next day
when we went to Versailles I hardly
saw anything because I was looking
at you the whole time your face I can’t
quite remember then I kissed you
good-bye and you got on a train
and I never saw you again just
one day and one letter long gone
explaining never mind but sometimes
I wonder where you are probably
married with children like me happy
with a new last name a whole life
having nothing to do with that day
but everybody has something like it
a small thing they can’t help
going back to and it’s not even about
choices and where your life might
have gone but just that it’s there
far enough away so it can be seen
as just something that happened almost
to someone else an episode from
a movie we walk out of blinded
back into our lives