At the Hospital

I just heard this from a friend at my book club. I was stunned.

He went to a local hospital for a blood test. Before the test, he had to sign a form. Rather than sign on the electronic device with a stylus, he asked to sign a paper version. When he read the form, he noticed that it said that by signing the form he gave up his right to sue the hospital, healthcare personnel or to join a class action suit.

He crossed out that wording, even though he doubted he’d sue. The woman at the desk said he couldn’t do that. After he disputed her, she told him that if he amended the form, the hospital would not submit his claim to his insurance company. He’d have to pay for the test himself.

He asked to see a manager. When he did the manager admitted that the hospital couldn’t refuse to submit a claim for the blood test to insurance, but that he just instructed his staff to tell people that. Thus the manager was telling his staff to lie to patients to compel people to give up their rights.

If you encounter such a requirement, know that you’re probably being hoodwinked.

My friend is planning to contact the nearest city newspaper. I hope people learn that they’re being lied to. Another woman at the book club shared that she went to a new doctor and was given a similar form and was told that if she didn’t sign a paper waiving her legal right to sue, the doctor wouldn’t see her.

I understand that doctors worry about law suits, baseless and not, but that’s been the case for decades and they do have insurance for malpractice. Yes, that can be expensive depending on the doctor’s speciality and other factors, but it’s part of doing business.

I just spoke with my brother, who’s a lawyer about this. He says these “I won’t sue” clauses aren’t enforceable. You can sue. Still this practice is deceptive.

I’d refuse to waive any rights.

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Death by China

I’m watching this timely documentary now. You can watch the entire film here. I’ll review it soon.

Martin Sheen narrates.

Poor Dwight and Morwenna

clowrance

Sunday’s Poldark episode began by showing the villagers poorer and starving. Yet, and this should come as no surprise, George had no mercy or compassion for them. He rounded up those he could and sentenced them to 15 years in prison.

Also, the program included the fastest, no fuss, birth I’ve ever seen on television. In one scene Demelza’s digging potatoes and a bit later she’s got her new daughter Clowance  in her hands.  I didn’t actually mind the abbreviated birth because the episode was packed with other events.

Dwight is stuck in a dank, dark, decrepit prison which rivaled the Les Misérables Paris sewers for hygiene. Yet despite the starvation and mental anguish of his imprisonment, heroic Dwight manages to perform surgery in his cell.

carpe diem morwenna

Carpe diem, Morwenna

Morwenna and Drake, both reserved by nature, tentatively get closer. Yet as Morwenna’s charge Geoffrey speaks up to George and is found to have gone to Clowance’s baptism on the sly, George and Elizabeth feel it’s time for her to marry. Poor Morwenna. The Warleggan’s don’t bother to find anyone at all suitable. They settle for the first slimy widower to come along, a much older and very greasy Rev. Osborne Whitworth. Morwenna should run for the hills! But there’s no one who can rescue her. It’s out of the question socially that she could marry Dwight who lives in a dark, old building with a dirt floor with his brother. Even Demelza thinks Morwenna could never marry down.

George doesn’t brook opposition, no matter how wise or how true. Thus he’s exiling Aunt Agatha to the dungeon of the coldest, darkest part of the house. He makes sure that she gets no letters, including Ross’ invitation to Clowance’s christening.

As so many people are starving Caroline and Demelza team up to get them grain. Ross finds a way to trick George so that he’s fooled into thinking the villages stole when in fact they were given grain through donations. Ross’ trick backfires as it prompts George to get even by closing his mine, which was once a Poldark mine just out of spite. The result is 70 breadwinners will be out of work and their families may starve, but George has no compassion and he doesn’t care. Be careful George, look what the French did to their upper class.

The episode was brisk and moved a long with lots of emotion and action. The hour whipped by and I didn’t want the show to end. We’re left hanging to see what will become of Dwight, Morwenna and all the others in this splendid cast. I find I like Geoffrey Charles more and more.

Considering a Job?

Dear EFL Professional,

If you’re wondering whether to take a job with Yucui “Education” Consultancy, Xiang Jiang High School, or Korea National University of Education, contact me. I can give you the low down. Not just my opinion, but that of others.

Remember I’m here to help.

Brian Williams Fiasco

Driving around yesterday I heard Chris Fabry Live’s show when he took on the Brian Williams issue. Williams said on air that he was in a helicopter that took fire when actually he wasn’t. All hell’s broken loose as we know and Williams was suspended for six months without pay.

Fabry asked callers what they thought should happen. Some thought he should be fired–period. Fabry kept mentioning that we’ve all embellished and misremembered. Again many pointed out that we just don’t misremember being shot at or targeted. True enough.

I don’t know Williams so I’m not sure whether he’s a good guy, an arrogant guy or what. I do believe in forgiveness, but don’t think everyone’s entitled to keeping a highly paid dream job. I doubt whatever happens to Williams he’ll become destitute. He’s probably got a book contract and will have six months to write a book.

Still I’m sure he’s chastened, humiliated and hurting.

If I ran NBC, I’d query the public on this. Let the people decide. I’d cross check William’s stories. And if this lapse was the only one, I’d put a poll on the NBC website and ask people to write in. If the audience thinks, they can rebuild trust with Williams. So be it. We’ll see him back on the air in mid-August. Television is driven by ratings anyway. If they let him back on the air, but his ratings fell, they’d yank him off. This idea makes it clear to the audience that NBC is listening.