Bargaining in Seoul

I do miss these markets in Asia. China had the best, but here’s a shopping mission in Seoul. Enjoy!

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Pull Up a Seat Photo Challenge

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Palace in Seoul

Here’s a royal seat for the Pull up a Seat Photo Challenge. It’s striking, but doesn’t look too comfy.

You can see more seats, chairs, couches, thrones, ottomans and such by clicking here.

My Beautiful Girl Mari

In the Korean animated film, My Beautiful Girl Mari, adult Nam-woo remembers his 12 year old self, who struggled with coping with his mom’s new boyfriend who’s awkwardly trying to win him over after his father dies. At school he encounters trouble from a bullying snarky girl. His one friend Jun-ho is even more bungling and awkward than Nam-woo, but Jun-ho is soon to leave for school in Seoul.

While at a stationery store with Jun-ho, Nan-woo discovers a magical marble while enables him to escape to a lyrical, pastel fantasy land inhabited by an ethereal blond girl. Yes, that sounds very non-PC, but it’s cool and Nam-woo does deserve some respite.

The film is quite realistic in portraying issues modern Korea teens face – uncertainty with fragile families, aging grand parents, and school bullies. I think the film’s more suited to adults because of the frame of an adult looking back on his life, but there’s nothing objectionable that’s on screen that would shock a child.

The art is done using Illustrator and has a simple look. It did look like something many people could achieve with a bit of training, but that’s not bad. I liked that the animators made the most of cost-effective tools. The scenery was authentic. I liked that in some instances the setting was an old, dilapidated light house. In American animation, everything seems so new and perfect. In My Beautiful Girl Mari most of the scenes just looked real.

This 2002 can be enjoyed by age 11 and up. Made in 2002, it proved that Korea has a lot to offer the world of animation.

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Theme Images - 428  21 July 2018

Hat’s off to hats. For Sepia Saturday I thought I’d see what hats I could find from different countries. I searched through Flickr Commons for these.

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Korea, Source: Cornell University Library, 1904

 

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Japan. Source: National Library of Denmark, 1925

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USA, Internet Archive, circa 1863

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Australian War Memorial collection, 1913

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Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, n.d.

For more Sepia Saturday photos, click here.

Word of the Week

Jeong (n.) Human warmth and mutual sacrifice.

This word comes from Ask a North Korean, which I’m currently reading. It’s in a section describing the economic conditions. When you’re poor, people value jeong as the way to help others and to have the right attitude to band together and survive.

ESL Watch

ESL Watch is a very useful website for teachers looking for jobs. Like Yelp or Trip Advisor it offers reviews of employers worldwide in the field of English as a Second Language. If you want to avoid a horrible job, checking this site can help you steer clear of the dodgy employers.

Like anything, you have to discern whether the reviewer is a hot head or the employer pretending to be a satisfied teacher. Despite this, it’s a step in the right direction.