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Weekly Photo Challenge: Wanderlust

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Shanghai

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Outside of Melbourne

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Kyoto, Japan

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other themed photos:

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Weekly Photo Challenge: 2012

New to The Daily Post? Whether you’re a beginner or a professional, you’re invited to get involved in our Weekly Photo Challenge to help you meet your blogging goals and give you another way to take part in Post a Day / Post a Week. Everyone is welcome to participate, even if your blog isn’t about photography.

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Here’s how it works:

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use a “postaday2012″ or “postaweek2012″ tag.

3. Subscribe to The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements. Sign up via the email subscription link in the sidebar or RSS.

Related Posts

Seiberling Mansion

I went to Kokomo Indiana’s Seiberling Mansion, known as the best example of the worst architecture. The Seiberling Mansion blends neo It’s a funky, curious mix and suggests an era and family that favored whimsy and imagination as well as comfort and luxury. Arthur LaBelle designed the house for Monroe Seiberling, a prominent and wealthy industrialist, who made a fortune in natural gas, the mansion is a combination of Neo-Jacobean and Romanesque architecture.

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The Seiberling family just lived her for a few years. The mansion then was home till the 1940s before University of Indiana used it as a branch campus putting up chalkboards and moving in desks, chairs and university posters.

When the university moved to a larger facility, the mansion was left to deteriorate. Vandals took over and trashed the place. In 1972 the mansion was turned over to the county, which restored its glory and turned it into a museum.

Some interesting features include the brass hinges and door plates with Moorish embellishments, the gas fireplaces, the parquet floors of maple, oak and walnut. Admission is $4 for adults and $1 for children age 3 -12. They have two different scavenger hunts for children and a pretty good video explaining the mansion’s history. The docents on hand are welcoming and knowledgeable.

Disclaimer

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