Sepia Saturday

Exercising On The Beach (1935) The National Media Museum : Sepia Saturday 542, 17 October 2020

Each week Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers with a visual prompt. It’s a chance to dig through the archives and share a historical image or two, or three.

Currier & Ives, and John Cameron. The Water Jump. , ca. 1884. New York: Published by Currier & Ives. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2002698186/.
Horse in Motion, Jumping
. , ca. 1887. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2005691965/.
Harris & Ewing, photographer. Horses Jumping
. United States United States, 1928. Photograph. https://www.loc.gov/item/2016888961/.

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Nerve

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Dick Francis’ mysteries are all set in the world of horse racing and Nerve is no different. I read it for a mystery bookclub and was disappointed. While I liked the affable hero, Rob Finn, I expected a murder in this mystery and a faster pace.

Rob Finn’s a talented steeplechase jockey, he’s an outsider in his own family of talented musicians. Finn also gained a little of my sympathy as he’s hopelessly in love with his first cousin. Yet as much I’m a romantic and found the cousin Julia a wonderful woman, she was his first cousin. For me that’s too close to be sure of good genetics should a couple have children.

In Finn’s world several successful  jockeys have been fired, injured and in once case the victim of suicide. What’s going on? It seems coincidental until just when Finn’s career begins to take off and he’s featured on a popular racing TV program, Finn’s horses fail one after another. Soon he’s shunned and isn’t getting as many races. Finn doesn’t understand it but vows to figure out what’s really going on and to rescue his reputation.

I liked learning about the racing world and I liked the touch of romance, but Nerve lacked mystery and the writing wasn’t terrific. I found that I could skim paragraphs and not lose out much. That’s not a good sign. My favorite writers make me savor every word.

Sepia Saturday

1909.167

This week I’m inspired to find some equine photos. How were horses used way back when? Let’s see what I found on Flickr Commons.

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State Library of Queensland, 1920

I thought 1920 was rather late for such transport.

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The Library of Virginia, 1958

That’s not a typo on my part. Check the source. It says this photo of a horse & Richmond Ice wagon is from 1958.

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Smithsonian Museum, 1864

This Union Army mail wagon was used in the Civil War.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Renewal

Circle of Life: Luoyang Chariot Museum

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Here’s how it works:

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use a “postaday2012″ or “postaweek2012″ tag.

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