Which Way Challenge

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Hong Kong

The Which Way Challenge, that Cee began, has been picked up by the Alive and Trekking blogger.  The beauty of it is that it’s free form.

This week I’m sharing a street in Hong Kong.

You can include images of doors, gates, roads, streets, exits, signs, paths, waterways, canals, railroad tracks, you name it.

See more Which Way photos by clicking here. You’ll be amazed at where people are going.

Thursday Door Challenge

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Temple Entrance, Hong Kong

Hosted by Norm 2.0, Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Click here, to see more links to more doors.

Two Million!

What do Hong Kongers think? These man-in-the-street interviews give great insights and a variety of points-of-view. I have to find out more about the June 12th violence at the protest as that wasn’t covered in detail here.

I wonder what will happen. I’ve always doubted that Hong Kong can give up the “two systems” part of the “One Country; Two Systems” bargain. Yes, China may be more modern in thirty more years, but so will Hong Kong. I don’t think the PRC will catch up that fast. Also, just going from China to Hong Kong you can feel the freedom. It’s in the air somehow.

People want Carrie Lam, the leader of Hong Kong to step down, but China only will allow a leader whom they approve. Will a “new boss” make any difference? I doubt it. Is there any way Hong Kong can be free of China? Will there be another exodus as there was leading up to 1997 when affluent Hong Kongers fled to whichever Commonwealth nation they could before the hand off ceremony?

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Horizontal Lines

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Names on Chicago Vietnam War Memorial

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Seoul Palace

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Chong King Mansions, Hong Kong 

Each week Cee of Cee’s Photography challenges bloggers with a fun prompt. This week we’re to find photos of subjects that feature horizontal lines.

If you want to see more fun photos, click here.

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WPC: Smile

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Children’s art

 

 

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In Seoul

1. Each week, WordPress will provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Wednesday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Just a few wonderful posts:

Civility at Work

I admire how this young Hong Kong protestor calls attention to the two men who are apparently spies and have been following him. He does it with respect and civility showing how the Chinese government operates and the risk those who want democracy face in the “One Country/Two Systems” era.

I pray nothing bad happens to this man.

Looking Up?

Ah, since leaving Macau, and maybe since leaving Phnom Penh, life’s been one hassle after another. In short, I lost a brand new digital SRL camera on a plane, had my visa rejected in Hong Kong and faced a lot of hassle and expense fixing that so I could get back into China before school starts on Monday.

I was forced to go to Shenzhen, a horrid, dirty, dismal city to get a flight to Jinan. I’m completely “shindoi” which is Japanese Kansai dialect for “tired, body and soul.” Now I’m back in Jinan, but busy preparing for Monday and helping the new teachers settle in. Believe it or not all of them had flight delays due to the high level of pollution. In fact, the airlines had four of them just take the train here.

You know something’s wrong if the airlines want you to take a train.

I’ll provide details tomorrow or the next day.

Violence

I really can’t take gory violence in any way, shape or form. Suspenseful, off-screen, more psychological violence is another matter. I do love cop shows: Law and Order, Law and Order: Criminal Intent, Sherlock Holmes with Jeremy Brett or Basil Rathbone, Columbo, The Closer, and the extraordinary Sherlock and Luther.

But there’s a line that’s been crossed — and the idea of people accepting pain in a psychologically disastrous way– is it. This season, sad to say, The Good Wife has crossed this line with their story of Kalinda, the investigator. She’s a tough woman and often saves the day.

This season we’ve had to see her sadistic ex-husband return and mess with her. She tries to stay away, but she also toys with him and enjoys some of the masochistic activities. It shows her as partially liking them so it turns my stomach.

Otherwise the show is smart and engaging, but I can read or watch something else. To continue down this seedy path just isn’t good for my psyche or soul. I hope this storyline soon plays itself out. Then I’ll be back.

I’m also struggling to watch two Asian films and the violence gets to me. The Korean film The Housemaid chronicles the story of a somewhat innocent, somewhat not woman who take a job as a housemaid for a very cold- hearted, rich family. The wife is materialistic, vacuous consumer, the husband a heartless, womanizing consumer. They’re both users, cold blooded users. The wife is pregnant with her second child. The daughter is about 6 or 7 and she’s like a little robot.

There’s also a middle aged stern woman who manages the household and eavesdrops for a cold hearted mother-in-law. The husband makes sexual advances towards the housemaid, who’s interested in him, though he treats her like a prostitute, like dirt. The mother-in-law finds out the maid is pregnant and “accidentally” kicks over a ladder the maid is on so she falls two floors. It’s manipulative, vicious and reptilian.

Though the film is beautiful and I thought a way to learn more about Korean culture. I paused it a week ago and can’t bring myself to watch more.

After pausing The Housemaid, I started watching The Drummer from Hong Kong. The image on Netflix made it seem like it would be a film about a traditional drummer.

Nope. It’s about a rock star who sleeps with a gangster’s girlfriend. The gangster finds them together and assigns the drummer’s father to bring him his hands. Yep, small world, the drummer’s father is a gangster, who works for the cuckolded king pin. The drummer goes on the run and his father tracks him down. The scene where the father goes to his daughter’s vet clinic and roughs her up, breaking a few of her teeth, was too much for me. Good Lord.

I remember a conversation with a Chinese man who said in China violence is viewed as beautiful, like a ballet. Whoa. Now you’ve lost me. Just like a scene with a father beating on his daughter so she could tell him where he could find his son to kill him is too much for me. And I’m fine with that.