Mr Selfridge: On Shell Shock

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As poor Henri LeClair battles against shell shock, here’s a BBC radio program, The Essay that focuses on this problem. Evidently, officer’s dealing with mental effects of the war were diagnosed with shell shock while privates were thought to be nuts or just malingering.

The Essay is a radio program featuring essays by writers on a myriad of topics, i.e. whatever tickles their fancy. I think I’ve discovered a little mine full of radio gems.

Mr Selfridge, Season 3 Begins

Harry and the crew at Selfridges is back. I’m devastated to see that Rose is gone. I would have liked to see a few episodes with her. Another season with her, sometimes sick, sometimes not, would have been welcome. She did open a hospital for American soldiers at the family’s country house. (The exhaustion of that was what probably killed the real Rose.)

The series sweeps us along to Rosalie’s wedding. Rosalie’s all grown up and has allied herself with a Russian bounder. He seems cold and distant. I’m not a fan of this Sergey. I doubt Rose would have approved. Harry’s gone along with the wedding so Rosalie doesn’t mourn too long. Not a wise reason to wed.

Still the wedding is gorgeous and the rooftop of Selfridges is an interesting venue.

Violet’s also grown up and seems to be headed for trouble. My guess is she’ll be painting the town red having some of Harry’s rowdier genes.

Henri returns from the war. Yet he’s hiding his post traumatic stress, which they called shell shock. If you want to avoid spoilers: Don’t look at imdb.com. You’ll be able to deduce what happens to Agnes and Henri there.

I like that we’re starting to see some of the aftermath of the war, e.g. the conflict between the female workers and the returning soldiers and the soldiers looking for work or begging. Selfridges and Downton Abbey have helped me envision the WWI era with much more insight. As it’s set in the city, I think Selfridges may convey the hardship even more than Downton. We’ll see.

I’ve mentioned that I have not taken a shine to Serge and his mother seems to be a fraud and sponge. Harry, really? Couldn’t you introduce Rosalie to someone better? Well, in real life this was what Rosalie wound up with. It’s painful to watch a marriage that’s bad from the start.

Victor’s restaurant appears to be a night club and he’s dealing with ne’er-do-well’s. If he couldn’t marry Agnes, it’s a shame he didn’t get the Italian woman to marry him. A woman from the Old Country, someone down to earth might have kept him in line.

I didn’t expect to see Loxley again. Well, though he’s makes me cringe, he is a good villain. Too bad the actress who played May Loxley, went to Australia. I really liked her, especially in season 2.

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Miss Mardle isn’t working at the store, but did stop by. It seems Florian, her lover, died in the war. I always thought that relationship was off kilter, that Florian was too passive for her, too immature. I’d like to see her with a man with more personality. Neither Mr. Grove nor Florian were men of action. They react rather than initiate. Yet I wonder if she won’t relapse and return to Mr. Grove. That would be a pity. Mr. Grove’s whining about his family is so annoying, so disloyal.

Since a few years have gone by, I’m glad we see Kitty married to Frank. That’s realistic. We don’t need to see each couple’s wedding on air.

All in all, it felt good to hear the Mr Selfridge theme and return to the store.

I’m posting this via email with a delay. I hope that works.

Recap & Comments: Mr Selfridge Finale, Part 2

Victor and Agnes resign

Victor and Agnes resign

The second part of the finale in the US (or episode 10 in Britain) begins with lively conversation at the Selfridge dinner table and Rose asking everyone to count on a traditional family dinner for Thanksgiving. The girls and Harry’s mother are back and the mood is elated. Then the mopey musician, Florian, knocks on Miss Mardle’s door. He asks about why she’s ending their affair and she explains it’s age. Really, I just don’t see this earnest violist as making anyone all that happy. It seems a matter of convenience. Whoever the agency would have sent would eventually have wooed Miss Mardle.

Harry has quite a morning. First Henri learns the charges in the U.S. are all dropped so he’ll sign up to go off to war for the French. Given what he knows about how the war is really going, I’d expect Harry to sit his friend down and try to talk him out of fighting. A little later both Agnes and Victor resign as they’re getting married while George is on leave. Like last season’s finale, Harry loses a lot of those he counts on at once. He did offer Agnes the chance to stay on, which she refused. Big mistake Agnes. Though the real Selfridge seemed more conservative and didn’t hire or promote as many women as we see on the show, this chance to bend the British rules of not letting married women work should have been considered.

The Palm Court looks elegant and I wish department stores had such lovely restaurants, not only food courts. Henri goes to Victor to apologize for speaking out of turn about Agnes’ belief in George’s well being when he was missing. He also mentioned that he’s signing up for the army. I did notice that Victor didn’t apologize for grabbing Henri’s arm and almost coming to blows. This is one reason I’ve wanted Agnes to choose Henri. She was upset to learn that Henri’s off to fight. She does care.

Rose's doctor

Rose’s doctor

The saddest thread of the story is Rose’s diagnosis. Her doctor tells her her condition is fatal. We don’t get all the details. We just get stunned as she does. The scene in the doctor’s office is short and well done. Just enough to convey the severity and provide tension.

George is overwhelmed by his colleagues as the flock around him when he visits the store. They mean well, but a mob is not what he needs. Gordon saves George saying that he should go talk with his father. I wish Henri and Gordon, who’s so keen to serve, sat in on this talk. George describes refers to the horrors of war. News and letters are censored so the public’s in the dark about the truth. It’s still a bit oblique. I wish he’d gone into more detail since we don’t see actual battle scenes. That could have been more powerful. By the end, George has inspired the store’s new displays “The Comforts of Home” about all the things that keep the soldiers going. Agnes’ swan song.

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The best image in the episode, I think, was of Rose letting the water in the fountain go over her hand when she’s at home. What a beautiful way to depict how she’s needing soothing after hearing her doctor’s diagnosis. Mr Frasier, the butler, enters and asks if all’s well. Stoically, Rose says it is and mentions that she needs to discuss Thanksgiving with him. She needs this holiday more than ever.

There’s a flurry of activity at the store as all departments prepare for the Comforts of Home campaign. A good series of scenes showing how creative and cooperative everyone is and how well Harry knows his business. At home, Rose shows the same vigor and finesse in planning Thanksgiving. Announcing that she’ll make her own pecan pies, Rose amazes Mae, who’s still staying with them. Lois, Harry’s mother, senses that something’s awry with Rose. This holiday’s getting more than the usual attention. At Victor’s Agnes, Victor and Franco plan for the wedding as a quiet George looks on. Agnes suggest putting pine needles on the floor to give the space aroma. It sounds splendid, but everyone–Victor, George and Agnes — is distracted and in their own world keeping their concerns and worries to themselves, which made for a good scene.

Following Miss Calthorpe’s advice to take action, Miss Mardle arranged for Florian to audition with an orchestra up north. He’s ticked off. He’d rather sit and brood in his room. How attractive. He sends her out of his room. It wouldn’t be the least bit hard for him to take action and contact his agency to get moved. Again, I feel there’s got to be someone better for her, someone with a pulse.

 

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