Day for Night

In the film world Day for Night refers to shooting a night scene during the day using a filter over the camera lens. I’d read a bit about the making of this film in Truffaut’s biography.

But when I started watching this film about making a film, I wasn’t sure I’d like it. Early on I felt Day for Night was too self-aware, however I soon warmed up to Jacqueline Bissett, Jean-Pierre Léaud and François Truffaut himself as soon as their vulnerabilities became clear and the success or completion of the film was in jeopardy. Bissett plays a fragile woman who’s recently recovered from a nervous breakdown. As usual, Léaud is a n alter-ego for Truffaut. It’s not new territory, but he carries it off like no one else can.

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When the film gets into the actors various relationships and the hanky-panky that takes place, I got more into the film and it won me over. It caught the 1970s well.

Also, Truffaut’s montages were creative and engaging, without overdoing it. I’d say this isn’t a must-see, but it is an entertaining film. Given Truffaut’s biography, I’d say the hanky-panky shown, it’s true to life. I felt it was a realistic view of filmmaking, which shows the art, business and relationships of a film crew.

 

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Making of Fanny’s Journey

Here’s a 20 minute video about the making of Fanny’s Journey, a well-crafted film based on a true story of a 13 year old girl who’s got to lead eight children out of Nazi-controlled France to Switzerland during WWII.

Kurosawa: Masterful Movement

I’ve watched this engrossing, enlightening YouTube video by Tony Zhou of Every Frame a Painting, three times. He makes it clear how much more absorbing a Kurosawa film is than your average Hollywood film often due to the masterful use of movement.

What’s more, I enjoyed spotting the films I’d seen: The Men Who Tread on the Tiger’s Tail, One Wonderful Sunday, I Live in Fear and Ikiro.