Tell Me Something Good

monday-morning-inspiration-quotes-e1442491467149
Tell Me Something Good is a simple challenge that prompts bloggers to share a nugget of positive news or wisdom and it’s started by the creator of A Momma’s View.

  • I’m almost done reading The Wings of the Dove. I don’t like the book but I agreed to read it with a friend for our online summer novel discussion. I’m just glad to be finished with this onerous task.
  • I loved the film Fanny’s Journey, a tale of courage during WWII.
  • We got some rain. We need more because the the leaves are withering and the grass is brown.

So for all of you who would like to play along and stick to the rules, here they are:

It’s easy:

Mention something that you consider being good in the comments

• Or write a post about it on your blog (please don’t forget the pingback if you do so I don’t miss out and also share the link to it in the comments below). Something good that happened to you recently, or something good you will experience in a little while, or something good you know will happen soon. Something that makes you feel good.

• Share this post and invite your followers as well.

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Tell Me Something Good

monday-morning-inspiration-quotes-e1442491467149
Tell Me Something Good is a simple challenge that prompts bloggers to share a nugget of positive news or wisdom and it’s started by the creator of A Momma’s View.

  • I’ve been learning to use Adobe Illustrator and PhotoShop. While you can fiddle around with them and get some good effects, I’m amazed by all things you can do with these programs. (The problem is they’re so expensive and I don’t need them for work so I have to practice at the library.) I highly recommend Lynda.com’s course Illustrator for Non-Illustrators.
  • We had a nice neighborhood cocktail night, as always on Mondays. Down the road, one woman always hosts a BYOB and appetizers evening on her patio. It’s a simple way to promote community.
  • Positive News: Here’s something I learned last week from reading When by Dan Pink. Singing in a group like a choir has similar health benefits to exercise. It’ll lower your blood pressure, improve cardio health, increased sense of well-being and it helps children learn to read. You can read more here.
  • Wisdom: We live in a rainbow of chaos. Paul Cezanne.

So for all of you who would like to play along and stick to the rules, here they are:

It’s easy:

Mention something that you consider being good in the comments

• Or write a post about it on your blog (please don’t forget the pingback if you do so I don’t miss out and also share the link to it in the comments below). Something good that happened to you recently, or something good you will experience in a little while, or something good you know will happen soon. Something that makes you feel good.

• Share this post and invite your followers as well.

Pamplona at the Goodman

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I was lucky to get to see Pamplona starring Stacy Keach at the Goodman Theater. Set in a hotel room in Spain, Pamplona shows Ernest Hemingway struggle with writer’s block as the tries to write an article on bullfighting for Life magazine. As he struggles, Hemingway looks back on his life – all four of his marriages, his conflicts with his father and mother, his writing career and his love and respect for bullfighters and their sport.

Throughout the play, vintage photos are projected on the hotel walls placing the set in history. Pamplona is staged in Goodman’s smaller theater, which resembles Chicago’s Shakespeare Theater so every seat provides a good view in an intimate setting.

Keach brings Hemingway to life and is wonderful in this show. You have to be a powerful performer to captivate an audience for 90 minutes. Kudos to Keach.

I enjoyed learning more about this writer and was pleased with the surprising ending. Just masterful. The play was one of the best of this year’s season.

Tell Me Something Good

monday-morning-inspiration-quotes-e1442491467149
Tell Me Something Good is a simple challenge that prompts bloggers to share a nugget of positive news or wisdom and it’s started by the creator of A Momma’s View.

  • My niece has been visiting from Connecticut so I’m learning about teen culture.
  • My sister’s in town for work and has shared her wedding plans. It looks like I’ll be in New York for at least 5 days at the end of September.
  • Work is going well in a general way. No big milestones to report.
  • Good News: Scientists have made a small-molecule drug that has helped paralyzed mice walk again. Check that out here.
  • A bit of wisdom: If you are depressed, you are living in the past. If you are anxious, you are living in the future. ~Lao Tzu

So for all of you who would like to play along and stick to the rules, here they are:

It’s easy:

Mention something that you consider being good in the comments

• Or write a post about it on your blog (please don’t forget the pingback if you do so I don’t miss out and also share the link to it in the comments below). Something good that happened to you recently, or something good you will experience in a little while, or something good you know will happen soon. Something that makes you feel good.

• Share this post and invite your followers as well.

Tell Me Something Good

monday-morning-inspiration-quotes-e1442491467149
Tell Me Something Good is a simple challenge that prompts bloggers to share a nugget of positive news or wisdom and it’s started by the creator of A Momma’s View.

  • The summer reunions continue. On Saturday I had lunch with a friend I probably see just three times a year, though I wish our schedules allowed for more. Yuki’s a professor and just returned from Japan where she worked on a project interviewing victims of the Fukashima. As you’d imagine we had a fascinating talk. Then my friend Theresa’s in town from Georgia. We went to high school together. Theresa’s a smart and very fair woman able to bring new insights to any discussion. I also like how she sticks up for the ideas louder voices try to drown out.
    After meeting for church Theresa and I had lunch with another high school friend and her fiancé . So  I got to meet him for the first time.
  • I had a good week at work that included a shift on the bookmobile, a wonderful outreach. I was impressed by how well rounded the smaller collection on the bus was so that there really was something for everyone. We stopped at the park, an apartment complex and three senior living centers before noon.
  • I went to a good play at the Goodman Theater. Starring Stacy Keach, Pamplona was about Ernest Hemingway’s life.
  • We’ve had some delightful summer weather. Even Saturday’s rain was welcome and didn’t interfere.

So for all of you who would like to play along and stick to the rules, here they are:

It’s easy:

Mention something that you consider being good in the comments

• Or write a post about it on your blog (please don’t forget the pingback if you do so I don’t miss out and also share the link to it in the comments below). Something good that happened to you recently, or something good you will experience in a little while, or something good you know will happen soon. Something that makes you feel good.

• Share this post and invite your followers as well.

From the Writer’s Almanac

I never knew this:

It was on this day in 1958 that the U.S. Government dropped its treason charges against the poet Ezra Pound.

Pound had been arrested in 1945 because of speeches he had been delivering on Italian radio, in which he praised Mussolini and fascism, and criticized American policy. He was extremely anti-Semitic, blaming the world’s problem’s on the Jews. He practiced each speech before he delivered it, and he used various down-home American voices for each of them — he might be folksy one broadcast, speak in a drawl the next, and in a nasal Boston accent for the third. He kept careful notes of each broadcast and his performance — for one, he wrote: “Excellent delivery last night. Voice absolutely clear and every word ‘visible,’ except for a few Orful KRRumpzzz! of static or atmospheric or whatever that BLITZED out a few phrases.” He continued with his speeches even after the United States joined World War II in December of 1941, so it was at that point that his work became not just offensive but treasonous.

After his arrest, Pound was extradited to the United States and committed to a federal asylum, St. Elizabeth’s Hospital for the Criminally Insane. Over his 13 year confinement Pound was visited by an odd combination of white supremacists who admired his politics, and distinguished American writers who admired his poetry or his history of generosity to other artists, among them Marianne Moore, Elizabeth Bishop, Thornton Wilder, Randall Jarrell, Katherine Anne Porter, and T.S. Eliot.

Ernest Hemingway wrote to his friend Archibald MacLeish, who was campaigning for Pound’s release: “Thanks for sending the stats of Ezra’s rantings. He is obviously crazy. I think you might prove he was crazy as far back as the latter Cantos. He deserves punishment and disgrace but what he really deserves most is ridicule. He should not be hanged and he should not be made a martyr of. He has a long history of generosity and unselfish aid to other artists and he is one of the greatest living poets. It is impossible to believe that anyone in his right mind could utter the vile, absolutely idiotic drivel he has broadcast. His friends who knew him and who watched the warping and twisting and decay of his mind and his judgement should defend him and explain him on that basis. It will be a completely unpopular but an absolutely necessary thing to do.”

Writers and the media pressured the government to release Pound, and on April 14th, 1958, a motion was filed for dismissal of Pound’s indictment. Among the statements was one by Robert Frost, who wrote: “None of us can bear the disgrace of our letting Ezra Pound come to his end where he is. It would leave too woeful a story in American literature.” On this day in 1958, the government agreed to dismiss the indictment against Pound, and the 72-year-old poet was released. He returned to Italy, where he spent the rest of his life.