Blow Up

Blow-Up 12

About as exciting as it gets, i.e. not very

Michelangelo Antonoini’s Blow Up has an intriguing end, but the almost two hours leading up to it were painfully boring. It’s the story of a jaded, nihilistic, rich photographer who happens to photograph what appears to be a couple of lovers in a park. After blowing up the photos he sees what looks like a shooter lurking in the bushes. What’s really going on? The photographer returns to the spot and finds the man’s dead body.

So far that sounds like an intriguing plot. My concise description leaves out the scenes of vapid, sexy girls whose characters are no more developed than a mannequin’s and the occasional dull conversations the photographer has with his agent or the woman in the photos who tries to get them back once and then never follows up when she doesn’t get them.

Everyone in the film is tired. The young people, whether they’re at a concert or having sex appear dead bored with life. A couple of girls practically stalk the photographer hoping to do a shoot and get famous. None of that pans out.

Don’t waste your time. There’s a clip on YouTube of the film’s end which includes a bunch of mimes who play tennis and it’s a clever mini-film on our perceptions. That’s worth a couple minutes. Otherwise, the film is too esoteric for me. I don’t want to spend two hours watching a bored, passive lost generation.

SPOILER

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Word of the Week

Lethologica (n.) the inability to remember a word that’s on the tip of your tongue.

English is so beautifully specific, isn’t it?

Word of the Week

In honor of P.G. Wodehouse and his unforgettable character Bertie Wooster:

toddle

verbe

toddled; toddling play \ˈtäd-liŋ, ˈtä-dᵊl-iŋ\

intransitive verb
1: to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child
2: to take a stroll : saunter

toddle

noun

toddled; toddling play \ˈtäd-liŋ, ˈtä-dᵊl-iŋ\

intransitive verb
1: to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child
2: to take a stroll : saunter
I’ll be toddling off now! Cheerio!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Alphabet

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts.

Other great photos:

Word of the Week

fardel n. (FAHR-dl)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A bundle.
2. A burden.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French fardel, diminutive of farde (package, burden), from Arabic farda (piece, pack). Earliest documented use: 1300.

USAGE:
“He could be seen on the first night of every full moon, looking down with a fardel of twigs strapped with vines to his back.”
McDonald Dixon; Saints of Little Paradise; Xlibris; 2012.

“It was selfish of me to link you with so much wretchedness, and join you with me in bearing the fardel of neverending anxiety and suspense.”
Frederick Marryat; The Phantom Ship; E.L. Carey & A. Hart; 1839.

Word of the Week

From The Tenant of Wildfeld Hall:

rodomontade [rod-uh-mon-teyd, -tahd, -muh n-, roh-duh-]

noun
1. vainglorious boasting or bragging; pretentious, blustering talk.

adjective
2. bragging. verb (used without object), rodomontaded, rodomontading.
3. to boast; brag; talk big.

Word of the Week

peculation, n. ‘ The appropriation of money or property held in trust for another by a servant, employee, or official; esp. the embezzlement of public funds belonging to a ruler, state, or government. Also: an instance of this.’
Pronunciation: Brit. /ˌpɛkjᵿˈleɪʃn/, U.S. /ˌpɛkjəˈleɪʃ(ə)n/
Etymology: < post-classical Latin peculatio embezzlement of public money or property (5th cent.) < classical Latin pecūlārī peculate v. + -ātio -ation suffix. Compare earlier peculate n., and later peculate v.
Somewhat formal in later use. The appropriation of money or property held in trust for another by a servant, employee, or official; esp. the embezzlement of public funds belonging to a ruler, state, or government. Also: an instance of this.1658 E. Phillips New World Eng. Words, Peculation, a robbing of the Prince or Common-wealth.
1732 Gentleman’s Mag. Dec. 1094/2 Do they punish Bribery and Peculation in their own Creatures and Friends?
1779 J. Watt Let. 3 Mar. in Partners in Sci. (1970) 56 The person in Office there has either been guilty of peculation or of gross neglect of duty.
1844 U.S. Mag. & Democratic Rev. Mar. 238 [He] had just forwarded to the Committee written proof of peculations committed by Fouché de Nantes.
1874 J. R. Green Short Hist. Eng. People ix. §9. 700 Marlborough was dismissed from his command, charged with peculation, and condemned.
1950 New Yorker 30 Sept. 32/2 Mrs. Elkin’s voice dropped to the low, gemütlich whisper reserved for obstetrics, cancer, and the peculations of servant girls.
1994 Daily Tel. 28 Nov. 22/1 It would no longer tolerate a form of politics that favoured politicians above people and peculation above principles.