Word of the Week

Lethologica (n.) the inability to remember a word that’s on the tip of your tongue.

English is so beautifully specific, isn’t it?

Advertisements

Word of the Week

In honor of P.G. Wodehouse and his unforgettable character Bertie Wooster:

toddle

verbe

toddled; toddling play \ˈtäd-liŋ, ˈtä-dᵊl-iŋ\

intransitive verb
1: to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child
2: to take a stroll : saunter

toddle

noun

toddled; toddling play \ˈtäd-liŋ, ˈtä-dᵊl-iŋ\

intransitive verb
1: to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child
2: to take a stroll : saunter
I’ll be toddling off now! Cheerio!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Alphabet

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts.

Other great photos:

Word of the Week

fardel n. (FAHR-dl)

MEANING:
noun:
1. A bundle.
2. A burden.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old French fardel, diminutive of farde (package, burden), from Arabic farda (piece, pack). Earliest documented use: 1300.

USAGE:
“He could be seen on the first night of every full moon, looking down with a fardel of twigs strapped with vines to his back.”
McDonald Dixon; Saints of Little Paradise; Xlibris; 2012.

“It was selfish of me to link you with so much wretchedness, and join you with me in bearing the fardel of neverending anxiety and suspense.”
Frederick Marryat; The Phantom Ship; E.L. Carey & A. Hart; 1839.

Word of the Week

From The Tenant of Wildfeld Hall:

rodomontade [rod-uh-mon-teyd, -tahd, -muh n-, roh-duh-]

noun
1. vainglorious boasting or bragging; pretentious, blustering talk.

adjective
2. bragging. verb (used without object), rodomontaded, rodomontading.
3. to boast; brag; talk big.

Word of the Week

peculation, n. ‘ The appropriation of money or property held in trust for another by a servant, employee, or official; esp. the embezzlement of public funds belonging to a ruler, state, or government. Also: an instance of this.’
Pronunciation: Brit. /ˌpɛkjᵿˈleɪʃn/, U.S. /ˌpɛkjəˈleɪʃ(ə)n/
Etymology: < post-classical Latin peculatio embezzlement of public money or property (5th cent.) < classical Latin pecūlārī peculate v. + -ātio -ation suffix. Compare earlier peculate n., and later peculate v.
Somewhat formal in later use. The appropriation of money or property held in trust for another by a servant, employee, or official; esp. the embezzlement of public funds belonging to a ruler, state, or government. Also: an instance of this.1658 E. Phillips New World Eng. Words, Peculation, a robbing of the Prince or Common-wealth.
1732 Gentleman’s Mag. Dec. 1094/2 Do they punish Bribery and Peculation in their own Creatures and Friends?
1779 J. Watt Let. 3 Mar. in Partners in Sci. (1970) 56 The person in Office there has either been guilty of peculation or of gross neglect of duty.
1844 U.S. Mag. & Democratic Rev. Mar. 238 [He] had just forwarded to the Committee written proof of peculations committed by Fouché de Nantes.
1874 J. R. Green Short Hist. Eng. People ix. §9. 700 Marlborough was dismissed from his command, charged with peculation, and condemned.
1950 New Yorker 30 Sept. 32/2 Mrs. Elkin’s voice dropped to the low, gemütlich whisper reserved for obstetrics, cancer, and the peculations of servant girls.
1994 Daily Tel. 28 Nov. 22/1 It would no longer tolerate a form of politics that favoured politicians above people and peculation above principles.

Word of the Week

marplot, n. and adj.
[‘ A person who or (occas.) a thing which spoils a plot or hinders the success of any undertaking.’]
Pronunciation: Brit. /ˈmɑːplɒt/, U.S. /ˈmɑrˌplɑt/
Etymology: < mar- comb. form + plot n.
For a similar earlier formation as the name of a character in a play (see quot. 1709 at sense A.) compare the name of the eponymous protagonist of Sir Martin Mar-all, a play by Dryden and William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle (1668).
A. n. A person who or (occas.) a thing which spoils a plot or hinders the success of any undertaking.In early use allusively as a personification.
1709 S. Centlivre Busie Body Dram. Pers., Marplot.
1723 R. Steele (title) The censor censured; or, The conscious lovers examin’d: in a dialogue between Sir Dicky Marplot and Jack Freeman.
1765 J. Otis Vindic. Brit. Colonies 21 His employers on either side the atlantic should discard him as a meer Sir Martyn Marplot.
1795 H. Cowley Town before You v. 87 What Tippy! I’m a bit of a Marplot here… This comes of entrusting your friends by halves.
1824 CountessGranville Let. May (1894) I. 295 What a marplot anxiety is.
1876 ‘G. Eliot’ Daniel Deronda II. iv. xxxii. 321 But what is the use of my taking the vows and settling everything as it should be, if that marplot Hans comes and upsets it all?
1880 A. W. Kinglake Invasion of Crimea (ed. 4) VI. ix. 380 In future campaigns the lieges shall not be the marplots they were in the days of Lord Raglan.
1915 F. T. Woodington (title) Fate the marplot.
1940 Amer. Hist. Rev. 45 343 Colonel Nicholas was a meddler and a marplot with a genius for intrigue.
1978 Economist (Nexis) 25 Nov. 123 Following in the footsteps of such marplots, Marxists, Maoists or malignants as the Lords Robbins and Bridges.
1982 Time (Nexis) 27 Dec. 12 Donald Nickles of Oklahoma and Gordon Humphrey of New Hampshire..teamed with veteran marplot Jesse Helms of North Carolina to filibuster the measure to death’s door.

†B. adj. (attrib.).
That spoils or defeats a plot or hinders an undertaking. Obs.1824 Lancet 10 Apr. 64/1 He casts a scowling glance upon the incorrigible mar-plot man.
1850 in A. W. Kinglake Invasion of Crimea (1877) VI. ix. 230 There were some of his fellow-countrymen..whose marplot disclosures seemed likely to bring down..a new onslaught of Russian masses.
1869 A. J. Evans Vashti xxviii. 392 Beyond the tender mercies of meddling, marplot fortune.