Saturday Sculpture

springfield-046_5251073990_o

Abe in Springfield, IL 

It’s Sunday again, but it’ll take time to get into the habit of this wonderful challenge. Saturday Sculpture is hosted by the Mind over Memory’s chasingmemory.

What you need to do is:

This sounds like a fun challenge.

Advertisements

Saturday Sculpture

fullsizeoutput_dff.jpeg

I know it’s Sunday, but I just learned about this new photo challenge this morning. Saturday Sculpture is hosted by the Mind over Memory‘s chasingmemory.

DSCN2380.JPG

DSCN2375.jpg

What you need to do is:

  • Share a photo of art in or outside of a museum and post it on your blog.
  • Link or pingback to Mind over Memory.

This sounds like a fun challenge.

Sepia Saturday

18EB32

<strong>Floods can be so devastating, yet these kids are making the best of it. Here are some historic floods from Flickr Commons. Click here to see more blogs with Sepia Saturday posts.

3583025293_5c8442b723_z

Brisbane, 1893 from State Library of Queensland.

26885393233_a066decf11_z

Lanceton, Tasmania, 1929 from Tasmanian Archive and Heritage Office

3110793630_bd194ff432_z

Luxor n.d. from NY Public Library</strong>

 

Aida

As I’ve come to expect, the Lyric Opera‘s Aida blew me away. Since signing up for the Lyric’s NExT program that offers $20 student discount tickets, I’ve discovered that I really like opera, at least some operas. Although all the NExT tickets were gone by the time, I bought my tickets, I felt the $55 tickets would be a wise purchase and they were.

My friend Maryann and I went on a Friday afternoon and first went to the pre-opera lecture. WFMT‘s Carl Grapentine, who’s got a sonorous voice, offered background that made the opera all the more meaningful. We learned that Verdi was rejected when he applied to the conservatory in Milan, which today is called Conservatorio di musica “Giuseppe Verdi” di Milano. Ha! Take that!

Aida is Verdi’s 26th opera and was commissioned by an Egyptian khedive (i.e. viceroy, i.e. a king’s representative). Grapentine explained Aida’s genesis and story, and I highly encourage audience members to attend the free pre-opera lecture which starts an hour before the curtain.

Briefly, Aida has a plot Aristotle would love as the characters are tied together in such a way that only tragedy can result. Ethiopia and Egypt are at war. Aida is an Ethiopian slave serving the Egyptian princess, Amneris. Both women love the same man, Radames, a strapping young Egyptian warrior. He loves Aida, but becomes engaged to Amneris, who senses her fiancé has eyes for someone else. Who?

As if this isn’t enough drama, Aida is the daughter of the Ethiopian king Amonasro, who’s been captured by Radames. Every one of the three main characters’ hearts are divided between loyalty, patriotism and true love.

No one’s going to walk off into the sunset and though as a modern viewer of stories in every media available, I get a steady diet of happy endings, I’m perfectly fine with this tragedy. I wish Hollywood trusted in the power of tragedy as the Greeks and Shakespeare’s peers did. We don’t always need things tied up with a bow at the end. Really.

A feast for the eyes and ears, Aida features masterful singing, spectacular sets, lavish costumes, and beautiful dancing. The English translations for the Italian lyrics are projected overhead so that even those, like us, in the nosebleed seats can follow the story easily.