Word of the Week

Petrichor – n. the pleasant smell after a rain fall.

Reference

Petrichor.” (2019). Oxford Dictionary. Retrieved from https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/petrichor on a rainy May 2, 2019.

The video of rain is great if you like falling to sleep to the sound of rain. It goes for hours.

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Word of the Week

Cui Bono: 

  1. 1:  a principle that probable responsibility for an act or event lies with one having something to gain

  2. 2:  usefulness or utility as a principle in estimating the value of an act or policy

I saw this word in a Brookings Institute article on the Panama Papers, a news story that’s grabbed my attention.

Works Cited

“Cui Bono.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2016.

Gaddy, Clifford G.“Are the Russians Actually Behind the Panama Papers?” Brookings Institute. Web. 8 Apr. 2016.

The Film Snob’s Dictionary

filmsnobdict

Written by David Kamp, The Film Snob’s Dictionary is a fun little reference book with a tongue-in-cheek tone that can help readers learn to b.s. their way through an erudite conversation on film or just help readers learn a little more about filmmakers and terms related to film.

Here are a few entries, chosen randomly, to give you a taste of the book:

Film Threat. Surprisingly buoyant, unsmug Web ‘zine (originally a print magazine) devoted to independent film. Where snobs go to read fulsome appreciations of Sam Raimi and interviews of such Queens of the B’s as Debbie Rochon and Tina Krause. (N.B. The website was bought and taken offline so where will we read these articles about people I never heard of?)

Mankiewicz, Herman. Gruff, whiskey-soaked, cigar chomping, old-school screenwriter par excellence (1807-1953)who bolted from his comfy perch at the Algonquin Round Table to write titles for silent films and screenplays for talkies, famously summoning his friend Ven Hecht west with te line “Millions are to be grabbed out here and your only competition are idiots.” A dab hand at many genres–he wrote or cowrote Dinner at Eight, the Marx Brothers’ Duck Soup and The Pride of the Yankees . . . .

Third Row, The. The only appropriate place for a true cinephile to sit, as per the dictum of  the late snob overlord and belle-lettrist Susan Sontag. Though the third row is said to provide the ideal perch from which to comfortably take in the MISE-EN-SCENE while unobstructed by fellow audience members, New York’s Anthology Film Archives, in 1970, catered to the socio-pathology of Film Snobs by opening its Invisible Cinema . . . .

Word of the Week

mogigraphia, n.: [‘ Writer’s cramp.’]
Forms: 18 mogigraphia, 18 mogographia.
Etymology: < mogi- comb. form + post-classical Latin -graphia (see -graphy comb. form), perhaps after mogilalia n. Compare mogigraphy n., mogigraphic adj.
Med. Obs. rare.
Writer’s cramp.

1857 R. Dunglison Med. Lexicon (rev. ed.) 599/1 Mogigraphia, writers’ cramp.
1891 F. Taylor Man. Pract. Med. (ed. 2) 339 The disease is hence called writers’ cramp and scriveners’ palsy; graphospasm and mogigraphia have been used as technical terms.

Word of the Week

cravateer n.
A person employed to tie cravats or neckties. Brit. /ˌkravəˈtɪə/, /ˌkrævəˈtɪ(ə)r/ Forms:cravatteer, cravattier, cravatier

Etymology: <  cravat n. + -eer suffix1. Compare French cravatier person employed to tie cravats or neckties (1712 or earlier).
 rare.

 1.  A person employed to tie cravats or neckties.

1838  W. J. Thoms Bk. of Court Introd. Ess. 28 If, however, when the cravat was put on, the Cravatier discovered that any part of it did not set well, the Cravatier could touch it, und himself put on the King’s cravat in the absence of the superior officer.
1859 Chambers’s Jrnl. 11 319 The master of the wardrobe put the cravat round the royal neck, while the ‘cravatteer’ tied it.
1967 Jrnl. Amer. Soc. Safety Engineers Oct. 13 The Sun King himself was..complimented for the appointment of a court cravateer, whose sole employment consisted of correctly arranging Louis’ cravat.
 2.  A designer or producer of cravats or neckties.

1949 New Yorker 26 Feb. 34/1 Mrs. Whitman, who incorporated herself as a cravateer, and a countess, in 1938, has produced and sold more than a million ties, many of them designed by herself.
1953 Men’s Wear 6 Feb. 137/1 In neckwear, the city’s largest producer (Superba) has come out with its greatest color selection… The same cravateer has gone in heavily for 100 per cent Dacron polyester fiber promotions.

Word(s) of the Week

I’m taking a course in Reference services in grad school. Our first assignment focused on dictionaries. Here’s a part of what I had to find:

1. What is a ‘trustafarian’?  Evaluate the authority of the source you used to locate this definition.

The Oxford English Dictionary defines ‘trustafarian’ as: A wealthy young (white) person with a bohemian lifestyle, typically one who adopts aspects of the appearance and culture of other ethnic groups (esp. Rastafarians) and lives in or frequents a fashionable, multicultural area. Freq. mildly derogatory. Also as adj.

I first tried the slang dictionary on UICU’s library’s website, but found no results. Since I expect OED to have almost every word and impeccable accuracy, I went there. I like that it defined this word, gave sample sentences and states that it’s somewhat derogatory, which helps a patron understand its use more completely.

“Trustafarian, n. (and adj.)”. OED Online. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2013. Web. (accessed on February 3, 2014)

2. What is samizdat literature?  Where did the term come from?  When was it first used in the English language? Where was it first used?

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, samizdat literature is: The clandestine or illegal copying and distribution of literature (orig. and chiefly in the U.S.S.R.); an ‘underground press’; a text or texts produced by this. Also transf. and attrib. or as adj. Phr. in samizdat, in this form of publication.

Samizdat comes from Russian and was first used in 1967 in The London Times as shown below:

1967   Times 6 Nov. (Russia Suppl.) p. xxii/4   A vast and newly educated [Soviet] population..do not pass around the precious samizdat (unpublished) manuscripts.

Since the question asked for etymological information, I immediately went to the OED, which I learned to use as an undergraduate. It’s a favorite dictionary of mine and well known for its etymology.

“Samizdat, n.”. OED Online.</cite Oxford: Oxford University Press. 2013. (accessed February 1, 2014).

3. What does IMHO stand for?  Does it have multiple meanings?
According to several dictionaries IMHO stands for “in my humble opinion.” Gale Virtual Reference offers more terms:

Idiots Manage High Office
I Make Humungous Overstatements
Inane Marketing Hold-Over
In My Honest Opinion
In My Humble Opinion [Internet language] [Computer science]

Internet Media House
Inventory of Mental Health Organizations [Department of Health and Human Services] (GFGA)

I searched Credo and found Webster’s New World & Trade Computer Dictionary had a definition. Since “Webster’s” is a name that is no longer copyright protected I wasn’t sure of the source’s credibility, but I was curious about a dictionary of computer terms. Since the patron wondered about multiple meanings I wanted to insure I found all possibilities. Gale Virtual Reference, which I found through Credo and therefore trust, offered a number of meanings, which should satisfy the patron.

“IMHO.” Acronyms, Initialisms & Abbreviations Dictionary.  Ed. Kristin B. Mallegg. 44th ed. Vol. 2. Detroit: Gale, 2011. Gale Virtual Reference Library. Web. (accessed February 3, 2014.)

“IMHO.” In Webster’s New World & Trade; Computer Dictionary. Hoboken: Wiley, 2003. Web. (accessed February 3, 2014.)

4. What can you tell me about onychotillomania?

According to American Heritage Medical Dictionary, which I accessed through yourdictionary.com, it’s a noun referring to “a tendency to pick at the fingernails or toenails.” Stedman’s Medical Dictionary confirmed this definition and added that it’s derived from Greek.

Since the term sounds psychological, I consulted a medical dictionary. First I tried Yourdictionary.com because I have never used it and I want to investigate as many sources as possible during this course. While I got a short definition, I wasn’t sure of Yourdictionary.com so I accessed the ebook version of Stedman’s Medical dictionary through UICU’s library. I trust that they offer an accurate medical dictionary.

“Onychotillomania. (n.d.). American Heritage Medical Dictionary. Web. n.d.[accessed February 3rd, 2014].

“Onychotillomania.” Stedman’s Medical Dictionary, 28th Ed. Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Philadelphia : Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2003. Web. [accessed February 3rd, 2014].