Touring Seoul

When Tanis and I visited Seoul we saw lots of young women in traditional hanboks, which gave our tour an extra sense of history. Above I’ve added a video of two Korean vloggers who explain that if you come in traditional dress, you get in free.

Another tip: As we exited the subway we passed a group of high school students volunteering to take tourists around Gyeongbuk Palace. I’m so glad we accepted the offer. Jin, whose English was quite polished, gave tours once a month to further his English and deepen his understanding of history. The tour was more than just your run of the mill “Look to the left, look to the right.” Whoever devised the tour included lots of Q and A so it’s very interactive and exceeded my expectations. It’s absolutely free.

Spring 2016 China 070

Tanis (center) with two Korean women

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More Photos of Urumqi

Headscarves

Headscarves

Where the locals shop

Where the locals shop

To see even more photos, click here.

A mosque

A mosque

Butcher

Butcher

Baked goods for sale

Baked goods for sale

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Word of the Week

cravateer n.
A person employed to tie cravats or neckties. Brit. /ˌkravəˈtɪə/, /ˌkrævəˈtɪ(ə)r/ Forms:cravatteer, cravattier, cravatier

Etymology: <  cravat n. + -eer suffix1. Compare French cravatier person employed to tie cravats or neckties (1712 or earlier).
 rare.

 1.  A person employed to tie cravats or neckties.

1838  W. J. Thoms Bk. of Court Introd. Ess. 28 If, however, when the cravat was put on, the Cravatier discovered that any part of it did not set well, the Cravatier could touch it, und himself put on the King’s cravat in the absence of the superior officer.
1859 Chambers’s Jrnl. 11 319 The master of the wardrobe put the cravat round the royal neck, while the ‘cravatteer’ tied it.
1967 Jrnl. Amer. Soc. Safety Engineers Oct. 13 The Sun King himself was..complimented for the appointment of a court cravateer, whose sole employment consisted of correctly arranging Louis’ cravat.
 2.  A designer or producer of cravats or neckties.

1949 New Yorker 26 Feb. 34/1 Mrs. Whitman, who incorporated herself as a cravateer, and a countess, in 1938, has produced and sold more than a million ties, many of them designed by herself.
1953 Men’s Wear 6 Feb. 137/1 In neckwear, the city’s largest producer (Superba) has come out with its greatest color selection… The same cravateer has gone in heavily for 100 per cent Dacron polyester fiber promotions.