Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge

Hats

Guard's hat, ancient China

Guard’s hat, ancient China

Each week Cee of Cee’s Photography challenges bloggers with a fun prompt. This week we’re to share photos of hats of any shape or size, for any purpose.

What will you choose to share?

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Yellow School Caps, Jinan, China

Yellow School Caps, Jinan, China

 

Crown, Shandong Provincial Museum

Crown, Shandong Provincial Museum

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Sepia Saturday

Three Beauties (c1920) Scanned Third Party Print (2002022)

Dogs make everything better. What a great prompt for bloggers!

Every week Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers to share photos of yesterday and yesteryear. To join the fun, just share images that are inspired by the photo above.

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Source: Florida Memory, 1920

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Source: Australian Maritime Museum, 1910

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Source: Library of Congress, 1910

Sepia Saturday

 

Posing With The Car - Liberas Collection, Flickr (Sepia Saturday 506)

This week Sepia Saturday inspires bloggers to share images with people and cars. The photo above reminds me of a clown car. I looked for photos with

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Source: Florida Memory, 1963

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Missouri State Archives, 1924

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Children of All Nations Day, University of Washington Archives, 1909

 

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Sepia Saturday

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This week Sepia Saturday inspires bloggers with a fondness for days gone by to post photos of groups of children. Join the fun.

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Desoronto Archives, 1912

Look at the regal lady posted on top.

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Library of Congress, 1910

Above we see a group of Breaker Boys.  According to Wikipedia:

“A breaker boy was a coal-mining worker in the United States and United Kingdom whose job was to separate impurities from coal by hand in a coal breaker. Although breaker boys were primarily children, elderly coal miners who could no longer work in the mines because of age, disease, or accident were also sometimes employed as breaker boys. The use of breaker boys began in the mid-1860s. Although public disapproval of the employment of children as breaker boys existed by the mid-1880s, the practice did not end until the 1920s.”

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National Library of Australia, circa 1910

Arbor Day in Australia (above).

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Sepia Saturday

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Dogs: What a wonderful prompt!

Positive image from a scan of a Powerhouse Museum, Tyrrell Collection, glass plate negative

circa 1900

Since my birthday is Wednesday, this photo from the Power Museum is apropos.

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National Museum of Ireland, 1912

According to the Flickr Commons site, the boy above is 9 years old.

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National Museum of Ireland, 1924

Before a hunt.

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Florida Memory, circa 1905

I love this trio. She’s got a great hat.

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Florida Memory, circa 1905

To see more Sepia Saturday posts, click here. There are sure to be some good posts with this prompt.

Dog-of-the-Sea-Waves

dog-of-the-sea-wavesJames Rumford’s Dog-of-the-Sea-Waves depicts early Hawaiian culture and manatees. With beautiful illustrations, we learn of how Hawaiians first encountered manatees, what they thought of these odd looking creatures and how they bonded with one. Yet manatees are not dogs and aren’t tailored to become pets so the story ends with a sad parting. This children books offers a poignant tale with lessons in culture and natural science. It’s be great in a primary classroom for a unit on the sea, culture, or animals. It’s also just a beautiful story to enjoy.

L’Enfance Nue

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In the same vein as Truffaut’s 400 Blows, L’Enfance Neu presents the story of a troubled boy growing up in 1960s France. In fact, François Truffaut produced this first film directed by Maurice Pialat.

While the actors in both films resemble each other, their personalities and stories are distinct. L’Enfance Neu is about François, an 11 year old, in the foster care system. His mother has abandoned him temporarily when he was 4. She doesn’t write and the boy knows little of her and nothing of his father. At the start he lives with a family, who has had enough of him. He steals, wets his bed, hangs out with the “bad boys” who mistreat cats and probably any other pet or person they impetuously think would be fun to test.

Yet François has his good side. He buys his foster mom a gift with the money his foster father gave him for his own use. He is a normal brother to the foster parents’ “real” daughter, who tells the social worker she likes François and would miss him if he left. The mother has a laundry list of François’ every fault and misdeed and the social worker realizes its pointless to leave the boy in this setting.

So François is shipped off to a new town where he’s placed with an elderly couple, who’ve been foster parents to dozens of kids including the teen Raoul, who lives there now.  The couple is loving and pragmatic. They get exasperated when François gets in trouble with his hooligan friends, but they respond as most parents do and they forget his past deeds and see the good in this troubled boy.

The story doesn’t end by tying a bright satin bow on the end, but neither does it just stop without some resolution. It’s realistic and fair to all sides. It doesn’t provide easy answers. François’ certainly affected by his parents’ abandoning him, but he’s also no worse than the kids who have parents. None of them say, “We shouldn’t through the cat down the stairwell” or “We shouldn’t steal ice cream” at the movie theater. In that scene there were several older boys who knew better. In fact, one of the older boys was a lot more self-destructive than François.

I appreciated the realism and the fair shake all the characters got. You could sympathize with both the foster parents, François and the others in the film. While the foster system is far from perfect, these social workers were conscientious.

Pialat worked with non-actors and the natural performances were as good as any professional’s. This was Maurice Pialat‘s first film, which I highly recommend. I’d definitely seek out others.

Some Writer!

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E.B. White: Some Writer! is some biography. A book for children, say grades 4 and up, is well researched and well written. Barbara Gherman’s biography is based on White’s letters and papers as well as on interviews with his relatives.

The biography begins with an overview and then proceeds to describe E.B. White’s life from grade school onward. The tone is delightful and readers get a sense of White’s shyness, his sense of adventure (within the US – traveling abroad was too much for him), his family life, love of nature and writing career. White, whose friends called him Andy,

The book contains many photos of White, his parents and family, which helps readers get to know White in yet another way.

As Charlotte’s Web, Stuart Little and his essay’s are among my favorite writings, I enjoyed learning more about the man. He’s as sincere and caring. He deeply cared about his friends, family and quality writing. The book was a fun, insightful read, which I highly recommend.

Sepia Saturday

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This week’s prompt made me search for photos of twins. Here’s what I found on Flickr Commons.

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Australia Maritime Museum, 1908

Aileen and Dora Woods (above)

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National Library of Wales, circa 1959

The Welsh title: Dau efaill ifanc o Landderfel sy’n godro’r fuwch bob dydd er mwyn cael llaeth i’w cathod of the photo above.

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State Archives of North Carolina, n.d.

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Library of Queensland, 1930

For more Sepia Saturday photos, click here.