Victoria, Season 2, Finale

Comfort and Joy

Sunday was the finale for this season’s Victoria. I’m not sure what I’ll do on Sunday evenings till Poldark returns in September. (I realize Little Women comes in May, but I’m not that sold on it. I think it’ll be fine but not as captivating. I hope I’m wrong.)

This episode mainly takes place at Christmas and Albert has Christmas Fever. His enthusiasm for having lots of Christmas decorations and carols was fun at first, till his desire for a perfect Christmas becomes irrational and annoying. It’s actually his subconscious way to cope with Uncle Leopold’s claim that he is Albert’s true father.

 

The episode begins with an officer in Africa saving a little girl whose tribe has been decimated. She’s a princess of a defeated tribe, and  Forbes, told the winning chief that his Queen wanted her. So the poor girl is traded off and Mr. Forbes and his wife take her in. Eventually, the officer takes her to the Queen who takes her in and treats her just line any of her own. Well, in fact, she seems more caring towards Sara, whom she feels great sympathy towards. Yet, all the while, Sara misses her new home with the Forbes.

Uncle Leopold has forced himself as an uninvited guest, his favorite role. Albert tries to force himself to be kind as he’s got Christmas Fever. Victoria is less blind to Leopold’s faults. Like all Brits, she’s not used to Christmas trees and such for Christmas. It was Albert who’s responsible for bringing German traditions to England.

Victoria2_EP7_3_Snow-1024x682

As if Leopold wasn’t a bad enough, Victoria’s most envious, plotting uncle has returned from Germany – Duke of Cumberland. He came to claim a favorite, expensive diamond necklace. Distressed by the uncle who wanted her dead, Victoria hoped to get some support from Albert, but he was so concerned with his perfect Christmas that he brushed her off. Since Victoria was still getting used to living in the palace without Lehzen, her lifelong supporter. She sure could use a husband who’s offers some support. Albert thought the necklace was insignificant, though giving it to Cumberland gives him strength and probably would result in emboldening him to try some other power play. Then Albert was critical of Victoria for mothering Sara as she did.

Yet in spite of Albert’s behavior, when Victoria was out with Sara and she sees Albert skating on thin ice, when he falls through the ice, Victoria goes into rescue mode and risks her safety, perhaps her life, to pull him out. That was quite a scary moment, and one that actually happened.

While Ernest manages to show kindness to Harriet, who’s understandably upset with him for standing her up when she expected he’d propose. Yet that nasty rash persists, and though Uncle Leo thinks it’s no big deal to hide his condition from a fiancée, Ernest has more principles. So he does tell Harriet it’s over, though he should have.

The episode concludes with Ernest giving Albert some brotherly advice and perspective. Albert’s dreams of a perfect Christmas is a delusion. They did not grow up with ideal Christmases. Victoria comes to see that Sara misses life with Mrs. and Captain Forbes so Victoria sends her back with them, though she always stayed in contact and did pay for her education.

I’ll miss my Sunday night Victoria episodes. Little Women debuts in May, but I don’t know what’s on PBS in the meantime. I’m not expecting much from Little Women, but I hope I’m wrong. I think my feeling’s due to my familiarity with Little Women, while Victoria and Poldark were all new to me.

I’ve enjoyed this second season, despite Albert’s occasional peevishness and the departure of Lehzen, Drummond and Lord Peel.

 

Word of the Week

In honor of P.G. Wodehouse and his unforgettable character Bertie Wooster:

toddle

verbe

toddled; toddling play \ˈtäd-liŋ, ˈtä-dᵊl-iŋ\

intransitive verb
1: to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child
2: to take a stroll : saunter

toddle

noun

toddled; toddling play \ˈtäd-liŋ, ˈtä-dᵊl-iŋ\

intransitive verb
1: to walk with short tottering steps in the manner of a young child
2: to take a stroll : saunter
I’ll be toddling off now! Cheerio!

Poem of the Week

Poor Dwight and Morwenna

clowrance

Sunday’s Poldark episode began by showing the villagers poorer and starving. Yet, and this should come as no surprise, George had no mercy or compassion for them. He rounded up those he could and sentenced them to 15 years in prison.

Also, the program included the fastest, no fuss, birth I’ve ever seen on television. In one scene Demelza’s digging potatoes and a bit later she’s got her new daughter Clowance  in her hands.  I didn’t actually mind the abbreviated birth because the episode was packed with other events.

Dwight is stuck in a dank, dark, decrepit prison which rivaled the Les Misérables Paris sewers for hygiene. Yet despite the starvation and mental anguish of his imprisonment, heroic Dwight manages to perform surgery in his cell.

carpe diem morwenna

Carpe diem, Morwenna

Morwenna and Drake, both reserved by nature, tentatively get closer. Yet as Morwenna’s charge Geoffrey speaks up to George and is found to have gone to Clowance’s baptism on the sly, George and Elizabeth feel it’s time for her to marry. Poor Morwenna. The Warleggan’s don’t bother to find anyone at all suitable. They settle for the first slimy widower to come along, a much older and very greasy Rev. Osborne Whitworth. Morwenna should run for the hills! But there’s no one who can rescue her. It’s out of the question socially that she could marry Dwight who lives in a dark, old building with a dirt floor with his brother. Even Demelza thinks Morwenna could never marry down.

George doesn’t brook opposition, no matter how wise or how true. Thus he’s exiling Aunt Agatha to the dungeon of the coldest, darkest part of the house. He makes sure that she gets no letters, including Ross’ invitation to Clowance’s christening.

As so many people are starving Caroline and Demelza team up to get them grain. Ross finds a way to trick George so that he’s fooled into thinking the villages stole when in fact they were given grain through donations. Ross’ trick backfires as it prompts George to get even by closing his mine, which was once a Poldark mine just out of spite. The result is 70 breadwinners will be out of work and their families may starve, but George has no compassion and he doesn’t care. Be careful George, look what the French did to their upper class.

The episode was brisk and moved a long with lots of emotion and action. The hour whipped by and I didn’t want the show to end. We’re left hanging to see what will become of Dwight, Morwenna and all the others in this splendid cast. I find I like Geoffrey Charles more and more.

Poem of the Week

Happy the Man

by John Donne
Happy the man, and happy he alone,
He who can call today his own:
He who, secure within, can say,
Tomorrow do thy worst, for I have lived today.
Be fair or foul or rain or shine
The joys I have possessed, in spite of fate, are mine.
Not Heaven itself upon the past has power,
But what has been, has been, and I have had my hour.

Poem for Veteran’s Day

Anthem for Doomed Youth

What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
— Only the monstrous anger of the guns.
Only the stuttering rifles’ rapid rattle
Can patter out their hasty orisons.
No mockeries now for them; no prayers nor bells;
Nor any voice of mourning save the choirs,—
The shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;
And bugles calling for them from sad shires.

What candles may be held to speed them all?
Not in the hands of boys, but in their eyes
Shall shine the holy glimmers of goodbyes.
The pallor of girls’ brows shall be their pall;
Their flowers the tenderness of patient minds,
And each slow dusk a drawing-down of blinds.

Mr Selfridge, Season 3 Begins

Harry and the crew at Selfridges is back. I’m devastated to see that Rose is gone. I would have liked to see a few episodes with her. Another season with her, sometimes sick, sometimes not, would have been welcome. She did open a hospital for American soldiers at the family’s country house. (The exhaustion of that was what probably killed the real Rose.)

The series sweeps us along to Rosalie’s wedding. Rosalie’s all grown up and has allied herself with a Russian bounder. He seems cold and distant. I’m not a fan of this Sergey. I doubt Rose would have approved. Harry’s gone along with the wedding so Rosalie doesn’t mourn too long. Not a wise reason to wed.

Still the wedding is gorgeous and the rooftop of Selfridges is an interesting venue.

Violet’s also grown up and seems to be headed for trouble. My guess is she’ll be painting the town red having some of Harry’s rowdier genes.

Henri returns from the war. Yet he’s hiding his post traumatic stress, which they called shell shock. If you want to avoid spoilers: Don’t look at imdb.com. You’ll be able to deduce what happens to Agnes and Henri there.

I like that we’re starting to see some of the aftermath of the war, e.g. the conflict between the female workers and the returning soldiers and the soldiers looking for work or begging. Selfridges and Downton Abbey have helped me envision the WWI era with much more insight. As it’s set in the city, I think Selfridges may convey the hardship even more than Downton. We’ll see.

I’ve mentioned that I have not taken a shine to Serge and his mother seems to be a fraud and sponge. Harry, really? Couldn’t you introduce Rosalie to someone better? Well, in real life this was what Rosalie wound up with. It’s painful to watch a marriage that’s bad from the start.

Victor’s restaurant appears to be a night club and he’s dealing with ne’er-do-well’s. If he couldn’t marry Agnes, it’s a shame he didn’t get the Italian woman to marry him. A woman from the Old Country, someone down to earth might have kept him in line.

I didn’t expect to see Loxley again. Well, though he’s makes me cringe, he is a good villain. Too bad the actress who played May Loxley, went to Australia. I really liked her, especially in season 2.

mr selfridge series3 episode1 01 e14221370198851

Miss Mardle isn’t working at the store, but did stop by. It seems Florian, her lover, died in the war. I always thought that relationship was off kilter, that Florian was too passive for her, too immature. I’d like to see her with a man with more personality. Neither Mr. Grove nor Florian were men of action. They react rather than initiate. Yet I wonder if she won’t relapse and return to Mr. Grove. That would be a pity. Mr. Grove’s whining about his family is so annoying, so disloyal.

Since a few years have gone by, I’m glad we see Kitty married to Frank. That’s realistic. We don’t need to see each couple’s wedding on air.

All in all, it felt good to hear the Mr Selfridge theme and return to the store.

I’m posting this via email with a delay. I hope that works.