Summertime

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I was surprised that Katerine Hepburn could bore me. In Davide Lean’s Summertime (1955) she did. Hepburn plays Jane, an American secretary on her dream vacation in Venice. She’s dreamed of this trip for years and has a lot of energy and high expectations. Soon Jane’s pouting because her trip isn’t as idyllic as she hoped. She doesn’t have any horrible mishaps like getting robbed or sick so to me she just needed to look for some alternatives. Maybe she should go out for a day with the American couple who seemed a bit corny, maybe she should go to a different city or get a tour guide over the age of 10 instead of the urchin who looked about 6, had no shoes, spoke English better than a lot of Italian university students and who spoked cigarettes, which Jane gave him. (That was something you wouldn’t see today. Jane didn’t spoke on screen ever, but had a pack and bargained with this ragamuffin for.)

Jane does bump into an handsome Italian, Renato in the Saint Marco’s Square and the next day happens to go into Renato’s shop. There’s clearly some attraction, but Jane’s awfully standoffish despite her severe loneliness which makes it impossible to enjoy Italy.

About half of the film consists of Jane moping, which made it drag. Eventually, Renato pursues Jane, who soon discovers he’s married. At that revelation, Jane wants to end things, but she’s so lonely.

Ugh!

Jane had built this trip up in her mind so much that it was destined to disappoint. When she talks of home, it’s not as though she hates it. We’re not sure why she never married. She does mention going to a real ball as teen so she’s had opportunities for romance apparently.

Renato continues to pursue her and responds with pat answers to questions about his wife and children. Jane could do better. I hoped she’d end things with Renato.

All in all, I found the film dull despite Hepburn’s ability to be clever and energetic.

The Drained Brains Caper (Chicagoland Detective Agency #1)

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A disappointing graphic novel, The Drained Brains Caper (Chicagoland Detective Agency #1) is a tired story with stock characters and illustrations that aren’t anything special. The story revolves around 13 year-old Megan, a vegan who wanders into a pet store to buy a tarantula. The teen minding the shop informs her that while the pet sop sells pet food and supplies, it doesn’t sell pets.

The surly Megan gets in trouble at school and her father, a widower, puts her in a private school to straighten her out. The clichés abound. The kids in the school are Stepford children with no originality or backbone. Megan won’t conform and strives to find out what’s going on in this odd school.

The stereotypes are heavy-handed and tiresome. The artwork looks like a lot of graphic novels and thus out of place in a story championing creativity. At least it was a fast read. It’s odd that the premise is that adults are draining kids brains, when most teachers wish to spark thinking. The concept of adults plotting to bore kids is commonplace and tired.

Blow Up

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About as exciting as it gets, i.e. not very

Michelangelo Antonoini’s Blow Up has an intriguing end, but the almost two hours leading up to it were painfully boring. It’s the story of a jaded, nihilistic, rich photographer who happens to photograph what appears to be a couple of lovers in a park. After blowing up the photos he sees what looks like a shooter lurking in the bushes. What’s really going on? The photographer returns to the spot and finds the man’s dead body.

So far that sounds like an intriguing plot. My concise description leaves out the scenes of vapid, sexy girls whose characters are no more developed than a mannequin’s and the occasional dull conversations the photographer has with his agent or the woman in the photos who tries to get them back once and then never follows up when she doesn’t get them.

Everyone in the film is tired. The young people, whether they’re at a concert or having sex appear dead bored with life. A couple of girls practically stalk the photographer hoping to do a shoot and get famous. None of that pans out.

Don’t waste your time. There’s a clip on YouTube of the film’s end which includes a bunch of mimes who play tennis and it’s a clever mini-film on our perceptions. That’s worth a couple minutes. Otherwise, the film is too esoteric for me. I don’t want to spend two hours watching a bored, passive lost generation.

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Price Check

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I wanted to like Price Check starring Posey Parker, but it was just unwatchable. The plot revolves around a dull pricing department filled with people who slog through their lives getting a new vivacious department head with no common sense. She shakes up these folks,  particularly a man who’s content to just lay low in his life. This guy’s married with a young son and his home life seems fine. The film tries to be zany and stir people up so they “live it up!” I really felt it was a poor copy of Office Space or The Office with less heart, laughs and satire. I stopped watching after 25 minutes when Parker’s character invited herself to the man’s son’s Halloween party at school and took the stage. I knew that Parker is seen to be someone with trouble with boundaries, but I just felt “so what?”

Price Check will not endure the way Chaplin’s The Kid or Modern Times has.