Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Flowing Water

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Tasmania, Australia

 

Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of flowing water.

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Drinks

 

Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of drinks.

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Tables & Chairs

Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of tables and chairs. 

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Steps

Stairs Wingspread

Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of stairs, either inside or out. I’ve chosen a photo of the stairs inside Wingspread, a Frank Lloyd Wright home in Racine, Wisconsin.

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: In Flight

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Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of flight. I’ve chose a photo out the window of the plane I flew back to Chicago from New York.

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Trees

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At the American Writers’ Museum

Each week Cee challenges bloggers to share black and white photos based on a theme. This week she’s challenging us to share black and white photos of trees.

For more black and white photos, click here.

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Beauty and the Beast

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From the library, I received a Fall Movie Challenge recommendation of Jean Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast (1946). It’s a terrific movie that portrays a dream world better than any film I’ve ever seen. This live-action film offers an atmosphere that surpasses most animated films, which are easier to make other-worldly.

Cocteau follows the original fairytale’s plot more closely than the Disney version. He shows a father with financial troubles, two complaining, selfish daughters, one filial, hardworking daughter and a lazy, wastrel of a son. The dynamics of the siblings was key to the drama, I think. From the start we see the brother’s ne’er’do-well pal wooing Belle, with no luck.

After some financial ups and downs, the father on a journey through the forest and stay at a bizarre castle where the statues seem alive as do the arms holding the candles along the wall, mistakenly picks a rose for Belle unleashing the Beast’s anger. Soon Belle agrees to return with the Beast to his castle in lieu of his taking her father’s life.

The castle is one of the best parts of the film. The plants that grow wildly throughout the home and the living statues and lights are freaky and enchanting.

This film is intriguing because in large part to how wild the environment and Beast seem.. Thus while the story is a fairytale, it will appeal to adults with imagination. It would scare young children, but they can enjoy the Disney film. Jean Cocteau’s Beauty and the Beast is a wild, imaginative trip for classic film buffs.