Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday 460 : 9 March 2019

Reading is one of my favorite pastimes and it’s this week’s inspiration for Sepia Saturday. Look what I found on the theme.

3236806056_a0d1236ef3_z

Source: Nationaal Archief, Flickr Commons, 1951

I didn’t know ostriches liked to read.

5471046345_722ebd89aa_o

Mennonite Archives, Flickr Commons, n.d.

9563964588_87e94ccc4d_z

Florida Memories, Flickr Commons, 1940

Woman in Sarasota reading (with schadenfreude) of the harsh winter weather up north.

I started wondering about what artists have done to portray reading. Here’s what I found.

berthe-morisot_2651640b

“The Reader,” B. Morisot, 1888

Picasso

Reading, Picasso, 1932

nurse-reading-to-a-little-girl-1895.jpg!Large

Nurse Reading to a little Girl, M. Cassat, 1895

To see more Sepia Saturday posts from this week, click here.

Advertisements

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Rainbow

DSCN3817

Pekanbaru, Indonesia

Each week Cee of Cee’s Photography challenges bloggers with a fun prompt. This week we’re to share photos with a rainbow of colors, i.e. at least four colors. I’ve posted a variety of pictures.

img_20170912_205412_623.jpg

Kids’ Art, Northfield, IL

39469382430_82f0980873_z

Yunnan, China

IMG_20180330_134606

More colors

 

If you want to see more fun rainbow fotos, click here.

cffc

Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

If we were having coffee, I’d tell you that I’m looking outside my window at a a beautiful snowfall. It’s graceful and serene.

On Saturday my friend Maryann drove down from Wisconsin and we went to lunch at Michael Jordan’s Steak House before going to the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit of Ukiyo-e paintings. All the paintings came from the Weston collection. Ukiyo-e art depicts the “water trade” or the life of musicians, dancers, geishas, and concubines of the era from the 16th to early 19th centuries.

dscn6864

I’ve started reading Crazy, Rich Asians, which has been flying off the shelves. Colline of Colline’s Blog recently finished it and that convinced me to get the book. I’m also loving Arnold Bennett’s The Old Wives’ Tale, which offers a witty look at small town 19th century middle class.

I did get a promotion at work, which goes into effect next week. In addition to assisting patrons, I’ll do more reference work and work on projects reaching out to local businesses and to seniors. Alas, I did not get the other job. A friend at that library mentioned that when she was who did get it, she realized that it was a foregone conclusion. There are a few more jobs, again all part time, that I’ll apply to. Fingers crossed.

St Hedwig Church

DSCN7533

My parents’ visit to St. John Cantius in the fall inspired me to seek out the most splendid churches in Chicago. I found a useful article  to help me form a list. My first church was St. John Cantius where I attended my first Latin mass.

Figuring the Christmas decorations would still be up, today I went to St. Hedwig in the Bucktown neighborhood.

DSCN7536

The church stuns with its beauty as you first enter. Lots of gold and gorgeous polished wood. Ceilings were painted with biblical stories just as they are in Europe.

DSCN7544

St. Hedwig’s Nativity scene 

The three Wise Men are due to appear on Epiphany, January 6th.

You can read the St. Hedwig parish history here.

Sunday masses are at:

8:00 am in English
9:30 am in Polish
11:00 am in English
1:00pm in Spanish

DSCN7540-1.jpg

Audubon, On the Wings of the World

th

I learned so much about the life of John James Audubon from the graphic biography, Audubon, Audubon, On The Wings Of The World [Graphic Biography]. I knew nothing about his dedicated wife, who had to put up with her husband’s long absences as he worked on his magnum opus,  The Birds of America

This book tells the story of his life from his first foray into illustration and his courtship. His wife was incredibly patient and supportive. What Audubon was trying to do, illustrate birds so that they seemed fully alive, was unheard of in his day and he experienced great frustration because people kept comparing him to Alexander Wilson, an earlier illustrator, who inspired Audubon, but whom Audubon believed was inferior.

Audubon-4

I was shocked at the number of birds, Audubon shot in order to illustrate all the species found in American. He’d shoot many of one species and shot thousands over all. According to the book, he did not find this at odds with his love for birds or his desire to add to their conservation and our understanding of them.

On The Wings of the World, has good illustrations, though they aren’t on par with Audubon’s own work. That would be amazing — and would probably mean a much more expensive book. I feel I’ve a fuller and deeper understanding of Audubon, who’s presented warts and all. It would make a great gift and belongs in every library.

Loving Vincent


This week I received three suggestions for the library’s Fall Movie Challenge, which I chose “Groundbreaking” for my challenge. One of the films chosen for me was Loving Vincent, an animated film that investigates the end of Vincent Vah Gogh’s life.

The film was made from Van Gogh’s paintings and oil paintings inspired by his style. It’s a visual feast. The story is engaging. The hero is a young man whose father was a good friend of Van Gogh’s and the village postman. The father sends his son on a mission to take a letter of Van Gogh’s to the artist’s brother Theo. Soon the hero learns that Theo is dead so now the hero doesn’t know what to do with the letter and embarks on a journey to discover what exactly happened to Van Gogh at his death.

The film then goes back and forth in time  with black and white flashbacks of what took place at the time of Van Gogh’s death and shows how murky the the interpretation of what really happened is.

With Aidan Turner and Eleanor Tomlinson of Poldark, Chris O’Dowd of Moone Boy and Saoirse Ronan, the film stars Douglas Booth, who was new to me, but who does a great job as a stubborn young man learning to figure out life as he puzzles out what to do about this letter from a dead man to his dead brother.

Below there’s a short video on how they made this groundbreaking film.