Word of the Week

advesperate, v.
[‘ intr. To grow dark, to become night.’]

Forms: 16 aduesperate, 16– advesperate.

Etymology: < post-classical Latin advesperat-, past participial stem (see -ate suffix3) of advesperare (5th cent.), alteration of classical Latin advesperāscere to draw towards evening < ad- ad- prefix + vesperāscere to grow towards evening < vesper evening (see vesper n.) + -sc- (compare -ish suffix2). Compare Anglo-Norman and Old French, Middle French, French †avesprer, also †avesprir (both 12th cent., used impersonally; both obsolete after the early 17th cent.).
Obs. rare (chiefly poet.).

intr. To grow dark, to become night.
1623 H. Cockeram Eng. Dict., Aduesperate, to waxe night.

1647 R. Baron Εροτοπαιγνιον iii. 39 Flaminius persisted on in his journey; but before he could reach the Citie Nicosia, it did advesperate.

1809 J. Hutton School for Prodigals iv. ii. 46 See, the red gleaming of the western skies, proclaims that day begins to advesperate!

1875 K. Rigbye Poet. Wks. 3 When the day advesperates they meet Within some neighbour's cot to hold debate.

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