Movie-map.com

denise-jans-1149927-unsplash

After discovering Literature-map.com, I found Movie-map.com, an artificial intelligence site to help you find movies you’re likely to enjoy. I can play with it for hours. Now I have to see how much I like the recommendations.

After entering Zazie dan le Metro as a favorite movie, I got these results.

Screen Shot 2019-03-11 at 10.13.09 PM.jpg

I also liked The Red Balloon, Spring, Supper, Autumn, Winter, Spring, Edward Scissorhands and some of the others. I need to watch more to of the above.

Here’s what inputting Yi Yi yielded.

Screen Shot 2019-03-11 at 10.14.04 PM.jpg

You can contribute to the movie recommendations by participating on Gnovies.com.

Advertisements

Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

If we were having coffee, I’d tell you I really wish we’d stop daylight “savings” time. Just pick a time and stick with it the way they do in Japan, China, Korea, Taiwan, Costa Rica, Mali, Singapore,India and many more. The whole change makes me feel off-kilter for a week or so.

I’d tell you that I got to spend some time with my friend Kristi who lives in France and her tween-age son, who’s developing a more laconic, slightly “too cool for school attitude.” Kristi’s a bit shocked at the metamorphosis as her son was so chatty and upbeat. Now there’s a twinge of sarcasm and that common embarrassment to be around his mom, even when she’s buying him new Nikes. Is this inevitable or can parents limit this negativity?

I’m enthralled with the online course on the U.S. Constitution put out by Hillsdale. Today I watched the lecture on Legislature & Regulation. In a nutshell while the framers of the constitution spelled out the process for creating law, when the Progressives added administrative lawmaking to the constitution via agencies, they didn’t specify how the agencies should create regulations. As you’d guess this led to several problems and trips to the Supreme Court.

Princess Margaret 4

I’m missing Masterpiece’s Victoria. There’s a little void, but I think I’ll catch up on the Doctor Who episodes, I forgot I recorded. I did watch a documentary called The Rebel Princess about Princess Margaret. A lot of what it showed was in The Crown. I wonder how Queen Victoria would deal with Princess Margaret.

Outside the weather’s warming up a little, but it’s so ugly with the brown grass, leafless trees and dirty snow. I know this isn’t a popular view, but I wish we’d get another snowfall to make things look prettier.

I am fascinated by the Literature Map which enables people to discover new authors they’re likely to like through this website.

I just finished Bill Bryson’s The Sunburned Country. If that doesn’t make you want to pack your bags and head Downunder, I don’t know what would.

Frank Serpico

While I’d heard of the Al Pacino movie Serpico, I didn’t know the plot or anything other than that Frank Serpico was a NY cop with a rebellious streak. This documentary, Frank Serpico, gives the story of Serpico often in his own words and in the words of New York Times reporters and cops who worked with him.

Frank Serpico is a colorful character and always has been. The film is chronological and provides background on his youth and family. I learned that before Serpico joined the police force, he was a teacher in New York.

Serpico seemed to be a skillful cop who from the start was on the periphery of the force because he wasn’t Irish American. Irish Americans made up the majority of the force. The film makes much of how Serpico was an outsider which made him more likely to speak out, report and testify against the pervasive corruption in the NYPD in the 1970s.

While working in narcotics, Serpico soon discovered that most of his peers were on the take. Another investigation supported Serpico’s conclusion. Cops on up the hierarchy were taking in millions. As predicted, Serpico was targeted by the cops who resented him. If you’ve seen the movie from the ’70s, you know he was shot and abandoned by the other cops. Because a civilian called the police, Serpico got medical attention and lived.

Now in his 80s, Frank Serpico describes what happened and why he was so ethical. There’s an interesting scene when Serpico was reunited with one of the cops who didn’t report Serpico getting shot.

The good cinematography that adds point of view. The movie with Pacino is brought up a lot and as Serpico wasn’t after fame, he exiled himself far from the city. A few areas could have been eliminated or shortened as they were repetitive. All in all, this was a film that held my interest that apparently isn’t as embellished as the Hollywood production. So if you’re interested in the police in general or Frank Serpico in particular, check out this film.

Literature-Map.com

Screen Shot 2019-03-09 at 9.46.00 PM

Looking for a new author to read?

Say you like Raymond Chandler, Günther Grass, Tana French or Jane Austen or whomever.

Go to literature-map.com, enter then name of a writer you like and Voila! you’ll see an animated map of writers whose work is like that author. The closer the author’s name is to the one you like, the more people have indicated they like both writers.

Screen Shot 2019-03-09 at 8.59.56 PM

So Carol Shields fans also have reported liking Elizabeth Berg, Alice Munro and Anne Lamott most often, but also like writers farther from the center.

Powered by AI, you can add to the data by going to gnooks.com, entering the names of three authors you like and then answering questions about how much you like other authors.

I find I can play with this site for hours.

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday 460 : 9 March 2019

Reading is one of my favorite pastimes and it’s this week’s inspiration for Sepia Saturday. Look what I found on the theme.

3236806056_a0d1236ef3_z

Source: Nationaal Archief, Flickr Commons, 1951

I didn’t know ostriches liked to read.

5471046345_722ebd89aa_o

Mennonite Archives, Flickr Commons, n.d.

9563964588_87e94ccc4d_z

Florida Memories, Flickr Commons, 1940

Woman in Sarasota reading (with schadenfreude) of the harsh winter weather up north.

I started wondering about what artists have done to portray reading. Here’s what I found.

berthe-morisot_2651640b

“The Reader,” B. Morisot, 1888

Picasso

Reading, Picasso, 1932

nurse-reading-to-a-little-girl-1895.jpg!Large

Nurse Reading to a little Girl, M. Cassat, 1895

To see more Sepia Saturday posts from this week, click here.

Kind Hearts and Coronets

crit kind hearts
Starring Dennis Price and Alex Guinness, Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949) is a black comedy of revenge. Louis Mazzini’s mother’s upper class family disowned her when she married an Italian musician. After she dies, Louis seeks revenge. Using a different weapon or means for each subject, Louis plots to kill all eight of the relatives ahead of him in line for the family fortune.

Louis falls in love with his childhood sweetheart, but she throws him over for a rich man, whom she finds as dull as dishwater. She’s clearly mercenary, but then so is Louis as he’s reptilian in his ability to murder relatives one after another without feeling any remorse.

One quirk of the film is that Alec Guinness plays each of the eight relatives that kills. He plays young and old, male and female. It’s a clever technique.

The Criterion Collection DVD includes the American ending. The Hays Code prohibited films from showing a situation where crime paid.

Before I saw it thought it would be a much weaker ending, but they just added a few seconds with an action that I imagined would follow the end of the film. The British version led me to expect that action to occur. Nonetheless it’s interesting to see how the Hays Code influenced filmmaking.