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Word of the Week

600hygge1

By Dani Dipirro, 2016

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh not hoo-gah) is a Danish word used when acknowledging a feeling or moment, whether alone or with friends, at home or out, ordinary or extraordinary as cosy, charming or special.

I love this word that’s new to me. I found an audio book entitled “The Little Book of Hygge” at the library by accident. I’m listening to it now and will write a review once I’m finished. For now, take a look at the images below. These are the photos that a search on Flickr.com for hygge.

Screen Shot 2017-11-17 at 5.50.25 PM

Notice all the candles and sheep

Below is an infographic that shows the elements of hygge.

hygge

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Word of the Week

iatrogenic – a disease or condition caused by a medical treatment or an examination.

A friend just started studying psychology and learned this word.

Word of the Week

In my Project Management class, I ran across this term.

Parkinson’s Law – the time it takes to complete a task will grow to the amount of time available. This supports the idea that if you want something done, ask a busy person.

It also explains how if I take one class a semester, my time is filled and I could never dream of taking two, yet some students do manage.

You can read about its history in The Economist’s archive.

Word of the Week

Orthorexia nervosa – eating disorder when a person is obsessed with only eating an extreme healthy diet.

I saw an article in the Jakarta Post describing this condition. So eating vegan or only raw foods can become an obsession and lead to serious health problems.

So a little wheat or chocolate ain’t necessarily bad.

Word of the Week

gambler king
I’m currently reading Gambler King of Clark Street about the infamous Mike McDonald who was instrumental in forming the 19th century Democratic Party.

Again and again the word sachem pops up.

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“Sachem.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 9 Sept. 2017.

Word of the Week

waywiser, n. [‘ An instrument for measuring and indicating distance travelled, esp. by road; spec. a pedometer or odometer. Now hist.’]
Pronunciation: Brit. /ˈweɪˌwʌɪzə/, U.S. /ˈweɪˌwɑɪzər/
Forms: 16– waywiser, 17–18 waywizer.

Origin:Formed within English, by derivation. Etymons: way n.1, wise v.1, -er suffix1.
Etymology: < way n.1 + wise v.1 + -er suffix1, although the semantic motivation in sense 1 is unclear.

In sense 2 probably after German Wegweiser (Middle High German wegewīser); compare Dutch wegwijzer (Middle Dutch wechwiser), and also Swedish vägvisare (18th cent. or earlier), Danish vejviser (Old Danish weye wiisser), all denoting a person or object that shows the way (literally or figuratively); compare earlier way-post n. at way n.1 and int.1 Compounds 3.

1. An instrument for measuring and indicating distance travelled, esp. by road; spec. a pedometer or odometer. Now hist.
In quot. 1801: fig.

1651 R. Child Large Let. in S. Hartlib Legacie 80, I say 20. Ingenuities have been found even in our dayes, as Watches, Clocks, Way-wisers, [etc.].

1801 Monthly Mag. 12 98 It is with the spying-glass of conjecture, not with the way-wiser of record, that the bearing of their sources must be made out.

1802 Port Folio (Philadelphia) 17 July 223/2 The improved pedometer, or waywiser, which when worn in the pocket, ascertains the distance the wearer walks.

1969 G. E. Evans Farm & Village xiv. 148 This device works on the same principle as the measuring wheel used by the old road surveyors—a trundle wheel or way-wiser.

2011 B. Johnson Johnson’s Life of London 97 He [sc. Robert Hooke] was to be a familiar figure, striding around the ruins with his ‘waywiser’, his own invention for measuring distances.

Word of the Week

PCAN-Dongle_both

Dongles can have different endings, not just what you see here.

Dongle: n.

  1. a small device able to be connected to and used with a computer, especially to allow access to wireless broadband or use of protected software.

Words of the Week

I just finished reading Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra and have run across several words that aren’t used that much, but have a ring to them. Here are a few:

Vouchsafe: v. to give (something) to someone as a promise or a privilege

Huswife: n. hussy
   I guess now with so many working women, some of which would be hussies, this isn’t needed.

Yare: adj. swift

Forspoke: v. spoke against.

Shakespeare was a genius so he’d have a large vocabulary, but it seems that his audience would have known most of the words he used. Have our vocabularies shrunk? Yes, we use words like computer and telephone, but did they push out words the Bard and his contemporaries knew?

 

Word of the Week

I got an email with a slew of these sentences from my father. I like the sound of this word and the sentences themselves amuse.

Paraprosdokian, n.

The term for a figure of speech in which a sentence or phrase has an unexpected or surprising ending. Often used for humourous effect, and thus heavily used by comedians.

Examples:

  • “Where there’s a will, I want to be in it.”
  • “If I am reading this graph correctly – I would be very surprised.” — Stephen Colbert
  • “If you are going through hell, keep going.” — Winston Churchill
  • >li>”I sleep 8 hours a day. And at least 10 at night.” — Bill Hicks

Reference
“paraprosdokian.” (n.d.) Urban Dictionary. Retrieved from http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Senpai

Word of the Week

Cui Bono: 

  1. 1:  a principle that probable responsibility for an act or event lies with one having something to gain

  2. 2:  usefulness or utility as a principle in estimating the value of an act or policy

I saw this word in a Brookings Institute article on the Panama Papers, a news story that’s grabbed my attention.

Works Cited

“Cui Bono.” Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 8 Apr. 2016.

Gaddy, Clifford G.“Are the Russians Actually Behind the Panama Papers?” Brookings Institute. Web. 8 Apr. 2016.

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