Word of the Week

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esprit de l’escalier: wit of the staircase : repartee thought of only too late, on the way home

I learned this on Ash Wednesday during the prayer ceremony I attended. This French phrase is a pithy expression to capture that feeling of suddenly thinking of the perfect response after a conversation is finished and you’re probably back home ruminating on what transpired.

The priest used the phrase in terms of the story between Jesus and the rich, young man who followed all the commandments but turned away from Jesus because he didn’t want to give up all his belongings. In some ways that isn’t a perfect fit, but this phrase sure is useful.

This is the second, or bonus word of the week. I loved two discoveries and didn’t want to possibly forget this phrase. 

Word of the Week

Screen Shot 2018-02-01 at 10.21.47 AMnappuccino: noun. The practice of first sipping some coffee or caffeinated beverage and then taking a power nap in the afternoon. According to Daniel Pink on PBS’ Newshour, this practice packs a one, two punch. You get to snooze, but you don’t lose because the caffeine kicks in and you actually wake up in 20 minute or so.

If you want to see Daniel Pink explain and also describe his book When, which teaches people how to better allocate their time for energy and productivity — and safety, click here.

“What’s this about safety?” you ask. Pink reports that people who have medical procedures in the afternoon are far more likely to suffer from healthcare workers’ mistakes.

 

Word of the Week

Kikubari, a Japanese word, means thoughtful consideration for others. It’s neat that they have one word that English needs 4 to define. I found this while flipping through Discover Japan: Words, Customs and Concepts, M. Matsumoto, ed.

To really understand the word, we need more context. Here’s a bit from Jack Halpern’s  explanation in this book:

On your layout of a Japanese home, you have no doubt noted that the lady of the house has gone to the trouble to arrange your shoes, whisk you left in the entrance hall pointing away from the door, so that they point towards the door. This is just one of many examples of that subtle, rather elusive concept of kikubari, which among others, gives Japanese culture its unique flavor.

According to the dictionary, kikubari means “vigilant attention, care.” But, as is often the case, there is a significant gap between the dictionary definition of culture-bound words and their actual applications. . . . [K]ikubari is to concern oneself, or more precisely, to go to the trouble of concerning oneself, with other people by giving thoughtful consideration to their needs and feelings

How noble. I think serendipity of seeing this word has shown me what my advent practice should be. I should try to practice kikubari as much as I can or at least once a day.

 

Word of the Week

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By Dani Dipirro, 2016

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh not hoo-gah) is a Danish word used when acknowledging a feeling or moment, whether alone or with friends, at home or out, ordinary or extraordinary as cosy, charming or special.

I love this word that’s new to me. I found an audio book entitled “The Little Book of Hygge” at the library by accident. I’m listening to it now and will write a review once I’m finished. For now, take a look at the images below. These are the photos that a search on Flickr.com for hygge.

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Notice all the candles and sheep

Below is an infographic that shows the elements of hygge.

hygge