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Who is the iPhone Guy?

Here’s an interview of the famed guy who made his own iPhone by buying all the different parts from little vendors in Shenzhen, China.

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Make Your Own iPhone?

This man’s odyssey to make his own iPhone in Shenzhen is fascinating. I really got caught up in this project.

I do wonder how you get to the App Store and iTunes with this, though the main point is he made his own phone.

Find of the Week: Snazzy Labs

I’ve discovered a helpful YouTube channel for anyone with a computer that they want to use better or to fix. Focusing on Macs, Snazzy Labs offers helpful information to make using a computer more fun or efficient.

Check it out!

 

Computer Security

I recently discovered ThioJoeTech, a YouTube channel, with short, useful videos on personal technology. Above he talks about his experience getting hacked by someone in China. Fortunately, he got everything cleared up.

He also suggests creating super strong passwords. What’s good about the video below is he explains with reasons I’d never heard before. All his reasons make a lot of sense.

So Satisfied

IMG_20170725_204950

As it turns out, this mundane object has given me a great deal of satisfaction. As I said last week, my power cord broke while I’m in Indonesia, far from an Apple store or Best Buy. However, some YouTubers showed me that these cords can be fixed. I asked around and sure enough a student knew where to get this fixed. He refused to take any money, but I get this repair cost less than even the new generic cords that sell for $25. This sort of savings really satisfies me.

An ugly entry for this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge.

Click here if you want to see a video on how these are fixed.

Computer Woe

Now I’m doing a volunteer teacher training stint in Indonesia and wouldn’t you know my power cord breaks. I can borrow from a student, but that doesn’t help me on weekends and I don’t want to be stuck.

Right now I’m quickly writing with 12% of my batter power remaining. It’s tough to prepare a class and have this limitation.

I checked the price of a new cord from Apple and gulped at the $75 price. Even the generic $25 cost is more than I’d like. Fifteen dollars or just producing cords that don’t break the way phone cords, lamp cords, TV cords, etc. usually don’t.

What’s something you’ve learned to fix yourself? Did it give you

I am rather hopeful that here we can find someone who can fix the cord using a technique like the one above or the other below. I don’t care what my charger looks like and this hack is so appealing. It gives me that joy of fixing something and saving money.

Admittedly, I won’t fix this since I don’t have the tools, but I get satisfaction out of having something repaired rather than just always buying a replacement. Do you?

What’s something you fixed and saved money as a result>

Apple Problem

I bought a Mac mini to take to China hoping that a new computer that’s powerful would get me better internet speed. It wasn’t any better. Seems the problem isn’t the computer, it’s the system.

So I’ve brought the Mac Mini home to set up here. I would like using a desktop with its bigger monitor as an alternative to my laptop. I found a refurbished screen on Best Buy for just $56 so I was uplifted with that purchase.

But after setting up the monitor, I ran into trouble. I have a Bluetooth keyboard that I need to set up. However, I set up the computer to require a user enter their password. Here’s the problem. I need to connect the Bluetooth keyboard to the computer to enter a password. I can’t enter this password since the keyboard isn’t linked yet.

So I’ve tried to contact Apple either to have them call me for service or to set up an appointment. I can’t do any of this without knowing the computer’s serial number. The serial number isn’t on the computer. It’s found by viewing the “About” screen, which I can’t get to since the keyboard doesn’t work.

It’s so frustrating. I guess I’m going to go to an Apple store, explain the problem and request help to make an appointment through them. It’s so aggravating. I realize they design their system with just the usual problems in mind. No one on staff probably foresaw my problem.

I’d hoped I could call this in and get help.

Lo and Behold

Werner Herzog’s documentary Lo and Behold shows the history of the Internet and provides insights, some I’d heard and others I hadn’t, about the Internet’s growth and it’s effects.

I found the segment interviewing a man who had an alternative version of the Internet and the actual look at the earliest equipment and its presentation by a man who was one of the computer scientists who invented the Internet 1.0. Herzog interviews his subjects well asking all the questions I wanted to know and finding people whose contributions and work are crucial to technology today. I liked seeing the people behind the bytes and bits.

Lo and Behold would a good film for technology students, though you don’t need to be an insider to follow it.

Magic of UX

I had to watch this video for my Introduction to Technology for Librarians course. I love UX, i.e. user experience, but wasn’t prepared to be as delighted and inspired by this talk.

Josh Clark shares current and possible technology that’s based on how regular people operate rather than on what insider-geeks can cobble together (which is what he asserts the failed Google glass was.)

The talk runs 45 minutes, but the time goes by quickly because it’s so amazing.

Code Academy

For my library class, I have had to complete three courses on codeacademy.com. These interactive courses are free, though you can get a premium account and get a certificate and more detailed instruction.

We had to do the first courses on HTML & CSS, a style sheet language, Building a Website and SQL, a database. The courses were well designed with a good mix of theory and step by step instructions. Code Academy did have some bugs, which get fixed if you report them. I had problems with the exercises. When there were two tasks and I’d complete one, I’d get an error message for not having done both lessons even though the second task is darkened so you can’t do it till you’ve run the first. It was a minor annoyance.

While I prefer Lynda.com courses because they have more insider information and more of a human feel, Code Academy is a good place to get your toes wet to see if you want to learn more.

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