Hoaxed

Featuring Scott Adams, Jordan Peterson, James O’Keefe of Project Veritas, communications professors, and other experts, this film by Mike Cenovich explores “Fake News.” The face-paced, Hoaxed will keep you stimulated as it presents the history of Fake News along with examples, past and present. It’s a must-see film, though you should also read and watch other

It taught me about the Operation Mockingbird, when the CIA paid American reporters to write the stories it wanted. At first that was supposed to apply just to foreign media outlets, but later spread to stories that were published domestically. Operation Mockingbird lasted from the 1950s till the 1980s when Senator Frank Church went public about this program.

The film’s structure builds and builds so that a viewer will see how pervasive Fake News is and how so many journalists are guilty. Each subject has a different take and vibe from Scott Adam’s low key personality to the electric Stefan Molyneux’s caffeinated monologue, which is a compelling connection between Plato’s cave story and our illusory view of the world via media.

While the film isn’t as sarcastic, its makers have learned from Michael Moore in how it cuts back and forth between news footage and commentary.

Hoaxed (running time 2 hours, 8 minutes) is available on Vimeo.

 

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Green for Danger

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British detective film Green for Danger (1946) kept me guessing. Set during WWII in a rural hospital, Green for Danger begins with a postman, who dies on the operating table. Was it an accident or murder? When a senior nurse suspects foul play and starts to investigate, she winds up dead and it seems there’s a murderer in the little group of doctors and nurses. One doctor is quite a ladies’ man and is wooing/stealing the anesthesiologist’s fiancée. The hanky-panky makes figuring out what happened and why all the more difficult.

Enter Inspector Cockrill (Alastair Sim), who has the driest sense of humor I’ve ever seen. Cockrill, aloof and observant, makes Sherlock Holmes look convivial. Yet in the end, with great creativity, Cockrill discovers the culprit.

Green for Danger is a sophisticated who done it that kept me guessing and entertained. It’s got the with and gravitas of a Golden Age film. There’s plenty of steamy romance and betrayals.

Hearts Beat Loud

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A cute movie about a widower whose daughter’s about to go off to college, Hearts Beat Loud takes us into a small family united by music. Dad (Nick Offerman of Parks and Recreation) owns and runs a record store that’s failing. Focused on great contemporary music, dad’s customer service is costing him his business. Early on a customer asks “dad” to put out his cigarette, but rather than comply, dad replies that he’ll put out his cigarette when the guy buys a record. You’re probably thinking what I was, the customer can easily buy anything online, for cheaper. And that’s what happened.

Still though dad is a curmudgeon, he’s  good dad. He supports his daughter Sam’s aspirations to study pre-med. He also knows she shares his musical talent and taste so though the teen needs some prodding, they jam together and write songs together.

The subplots are a modern, i.e. tentative, lukewarm romance between the dad and his landlord played by Toni Collette, Sam’s first love and the grandmother’s early stage dementia, which doesn’t get the development it was due. Moreover, Blythe Danger’s portrayal of the grandma doesn’t resemble people with this condition. Grandma’s wandering and shoplifting mean she can’t live on her own any more. I think some scenes with her were edited because that storyline was forgotten by the end.

When dad uploads a song, which he wrote and performed with Sam, on Spotify and is blown away when he hears its now on a indie music playlist. Dad is gong ho about writing more songs and seeing where working with Sam on music will take them. Sam resists a bit, but since she likes music she lightens up on her summer school work and they write more songs.

The movie was cute and had some nice moments, but the plot wasn’t gripping. The obstacles are rather small, though realistic. There wasn’t a big fight to overcome problems like closing the records shop. It was odd to see the main character get a chance to stay in business, but just pass because it would mean him being less of a grouch. This wasn’t at all like Meg Ryan losing the bookstore in You’ve Got Mail, when a mega-bookstore opens. This shop closes because the manager drives customers away.

I liked the film, but kept hoping it would get better. The potential was there, but the script and film was weak because the creators didn’t put the characters into greater peril.  The music was pleasant, but a couple days after viewing I don’t remember the songs. They didn’t stick in my head. It’s an okay film, but I’m glad I didn’t spend the money at the theater. Get it from your library or on Netflix.

The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer

Starring Cary Grant, Myrna Loy and Shirley Temple, The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer is a musing light entertainment. Temple has transformed from the cute dancing girl to a beautiful young woman, though in this case a very fanciful romantic, named Susan. Loy plays Margaret a judge who’s Susan’s sister and guardian. At the start we see that Susan represents the epitome of teenage energy and foolishness. Her goals change weekly every time the high school has a different guest speaker. Susan sees herself as sophisticated and is blind to her own foolishness. Margaret tries to discipline her with grace, wisdom and kindness.

As the film starts Margaret is off to court to preside over the case of Dick Nugent, a debonair bachelor who’s accused of causing a disturbance at a night club. Of course, you’ve guessed that Grant is the bachelor. He arrives to the courtroom late and strikes Margaret as callow and annoying, but hardly a menace so he’s cleared and let off with a warning.

Next Nugent heads to the high school where he’s this week’s career speaker. An artist, Nugent enthralls the female students with his idealistic presentation. Susan is especially swept off her feet and hallucinates that Nugent is actually wearing a gleaming suit of armor. Before we know it, Susan is sneaking into Nugent’s apartment. Today we’d say she was stalking him, but in this farce things never get that dark.

If you’re looking for a light amusing film full of clever banter, sophisticated costumes and outlandish physical humor, you’ll enjoy The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer.

Madadayo

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Madadayo (1993) is the story of a high school German teacher in Japan in retirement and his devoted former students, who visit him, celebrate his birthday every year and who come to his aid when he’s in need is a slice of life film.

Unfortunately, the film dragged and got to sentimental for my taste. Lasting over 2 hours the film seemed much longer. I enjoyed seeing how devoted the former students were to their teacher and to each other, but that was the only good thing. The birthday parties and drinking parties got repetitive.

I suppose the climax of the film, which was written by Akira Kurosawa, was when the teacher and his wife lose their beloved stray cat, Nora. The students, now business men, do everything they can to find the cat as its loss has traumatized the teacher so much that he doesn’t bathe or eat. For a man who was supposed to be so philosophical and wise, I’d expect him to take a bath during the months the cat was gone.

There are better Japanese films. Watch something else.

Tea with the Dames

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Gather four award-winning, accomplished British actresses to gossip, reflect on their careers and to a lesser degree their private lives and you’ve got Tea with the Dames. Starring Joan Plowright, who I learned was Lawrence Olivier’s third wife, Maggie Smith, Judi Dench and Eileen Atkins, Tea with the Dames is shot in Plowright’s country home which provides an idyllic English setting for the actresses to look back on their careers and friendships. Plowright and Smith do touch on Olivier’s sharp criticism. He sure could make a cutting remark to anyone who wasn’t performing as he thought they should.

I learned how each actress got started, how dedicated they are to their profession and what they thought when they received their titles. I wasn’t that familiar with Atkin’s work and from the film, I still don’t after viewing this film. The film’s designed for people well acquainted with the actresses. If you’re not, I think you’d find it confusing.

There’s no real structure and the film meanders more than most interview programs. Still these women are captivating and I enjoyed seeing how confident and at home with themselves and with each other these women were.

Day for Night

In the film world Day for Night refers to shooting a night scene during the day using a filter over the camera lens. I’d read a bit about the making of this film in Truffaut’s biography.

But when I started watching this film about making a film, I wasn’t sure I’d like it. Early on I felt Day for Night was too self-aware, however I soon warmed up to Jacqueline Bissett, Jean-Pierre Léaud and François Truffaut himself as soon as their vulnerabilities became clear and the success or completion of the film was in jeopardy. Bissett plays a fragile woman who’s recently recovered from a nervous breakdown. As usual, Léaud is a n alter-ego for Truffaut. It’s not new territory, but he carries it off like no one else can.

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When the film gets into the actors various relationships and the hanky-panky that takes place, I got more into the film and it won me over. It caught the 1970s well.

Also, Truffaut’s montages were creative and engaging, without overdoing it. I’d say this isn’t a must-see, but it is an entertaining film. Given Truffaut’s biography, I’d say the hanky-panky shown, it’s true to life. I felt it was a realistic view of filmmaking, which shows the art, business and relationships of a film crew.