For Job Hunters

One thing that’s rather new when it comes to job hunting is that computers scan and sort applicants’ resumes. How do you know how to make it past the software?

I got some tips on this topic at a job hunting session given by the state at a local library.

To ace this step in the job hunting process:

  • Remove any text in the header because the program won’t read it.
  • Upload your resume without any bolding or formatting and save it as a text file. Upload the ugly file on the company sites directly and also upload your pretty resume or give some to the people whom you meet at an interview.
  • Don’t format your resume as a table or with tabs since this messes up how your resume will be read. The software that’s reading your resume reads from top to bottom, not across. I had used tabs and the dates were on the right side of the entry.
  • Use an online tool that compares your resume to the job description. The organization you’re applying to input keywords that they want the program to look for. You can’t know with certainty what they are but the best hint you’ve got is the job description.

One such tool is Jobscan. You upload your resume and the job description, press scan and voila, you see how well you match the job.

Screen Shot 2018-08-29 at 5.55.41 PM

Sample Jobscan results

The man leading this program suggested using a word cloud generator like Wordle.com to make a similar comparison. If the keywords in both the resume and job search are approximately the same size, you can figure you’re chances are good that you’ll get called.

Virtual Vocations

I just got a notice from a job board and clicked through to find out about an interesting Instructional Design position. I came to a website for Virtual Vocations and stopped when I saw that you had to pay to find out about this job.

It wasn’t what I called cheap either given that most jobs postings are free. I was curious about the A+ rating on the Better Business Bureau. I looked at bbb.org and saw that yes, they have an A+ ratings but as of today they have 6 positive ratings, 1 neutral rating and 6 negative ratings. How is that not a C or worse?

I read the negative reviews and people had a hard time getting the “guaranteed refunds” and finding suitable opportunities that were worth the monthly fees.

I’m not signing up since it’s common practice that the job hunter doesn’t pay employment agencies and there are plenty of job boards.

Thought I’d let the buyer or job hunter beware.

Tell Me Something Good

monday-morning-inspiration-quotes-e1442491467149
Tell Me Something Good is a simple challenge that prompts bloggers to share a nugget of positive news or wisdom and it’s started by the creator of A Momma’s View.

  • I started my first library job and the day went well. I’m so happy to be working with such a knowledgable, kind supervisor at a great library.
  • My niece and nephew have graduated from high school and grade school respectively.
  • I met the deadline for the Disney/ABC Writing Program.
  • I won $100 restaurant gift certificate for signing up for my local library’s summer reading program. You should join yours.

So for all of you who would like to play along and stick to the rules, here they are:

It’s easy:

Mention something that you consider being good in the comments

• Or write a post about it on your blog (please don’t forget the pingback if you do so I don’t miss out and also share the link to it in the comments below). Something good that happened to you recently, or something good you will experience in a little while, or something good you know will happen soon. Something that makes you feel good.

• Share this post and invite your followers as well.

Attitude Helper for Job Hunting

Yesterday I was lucky to meet with the Dean of a prominent university near me. I was blown away when I checked out her resume to prepare for this meeting. It was beyond impressive.

I was a bit nervous about meeting her, however, she was so helpful and approachable. At one point she advised me to remember that when looking at someone’s resume or c.v. to keep in mind that while it shows say three director positions at top workplaces, it doesn’t show the 15 other director positions that the person did not get.

That’s a helpful reminder that everyone gets turned down for jobs or falters in an interview.

Calling All Moms (& Dads)

mother-99748_1280I’m doing a group project for my library class and we want to find out how moms and other caregivers use their libraries and how they find out about events and offerings at their library. If you’re a parent, even if you never use the library, could you fill out this survey?

Many thanks!

Social Media Gaffs Cost Jobs

This was in my textbook on Project Management:

Ninety-three percent of employers check social media profiles of prospective hires. According to Money magazine here are the 10 most common reasons a candidate’s blunders on social media cost the person a job:

  1. Posting something embarrassing on the corporate Twitter feed.
  2. Sexual oversharing
  3. Revealing company secrets
  4. Blowing your own cover*
  5. Talking “smack” about a job you haven’t accepted yet
  6. Making fun of clients or donors
  7. Making fun of your boss or team
  8. Posting while you should be working
  9. Complaining about your job
  10. Drinking in a photo — even if you’re over 21

So you’ve been warned. I’m sure the sexual oversharing is not going to help anyone in the post-Harvey Weinstein-era, and it shouldn’t.

*Unless you work for the CIA, I’m not sure what’s meant by “Blowing your own cover.” Comment below if you do.

References

Poppick, S. (Sept. 5, 2014). “10 Social Media Blunders that Cost a Millennial a Job–or Worse. Money Magazine. Quoted in Information Technology Project Management by Kathy Schwalbe, Cengage Learning, 2015.

Baseball Trainer?

I just got an email from Ziprecruiter suggesting I apply for a job their algorithm thinks lines up with my background. I click and get to a job posting for a Baseball Trainer. I can’t remember the last time I played baseball. Maybe that was when I was in my early 20s and played softball. If softball doesn’t count, I haven’t played since high school.

Woe is me.

Ziprecruiter is not alone. It’s given my email information to numerous websites, like Indeed, Handshake or SmartHire, who bombard me with jobs teaching physics, chemistry, special ed or accounting among other fields I have no expertise in. Some refinement is needed.

My first choice for a job is a librarian position. Yesterday I had a good long talk with my mother’s friend whose husband was the head of Northwestern’s library. After the holidays, she’s going to introduce me to some people there. Fingers crossed.

My fingers are also crossed for a job as a librarian who coordinates the ESL/Literacy program at a public library in the northwest suburbs.

Of course, I’m also hopeful for a writing opportunity.