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The New Sunset Ridge

Our district built a new school to replace an 85 year old building. Last night Sunset Ridge held an open house to show the taxpayers and stakeholders what this $25,000,000+ school.

Learning Center (a.k.a. Library) Check Out Desk

Maker Space

Maker Space

 

 

 

 

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Poem of the Week

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Nine-Eleven
Charlotte Parsons

You passed me on the street
I rode the subway with you
You lived down the hall from me
I admired your dog in the park one morning
We waited in line for a concert
I ate with you in the cafes
You stood next to me at the bar
We huddled under an awning during a downpour
We dashed across the street to beat the light
I bumped into you coming round the corner
You stepped on my foot
I held the door for you
You helped me up when I slipped on the ice
I grabbed the last Sunday Times
You stole my cab
We waited forever at the bus stop
We sweated in steamy August
We hunched our shoulders against the sleet
We laughed at the movies
We groaned after the election
We sang in church
Tonight I lit a candle for you
All of you

Elegy for a sad day all Americans will remember

Buy your Glasses in China!

How is this legal? We should get this monopoly broken up.

I have contacted my senators.

Well . . .

I must say I’m stunned, by the election results. There will be plenty of analysis and talking heads will have a field day. I need time to absorb all this and to gain some perspective.

I do think Hillary lost rather than Trump won. I think any Democrat other than Hillary could have won, just as I think any GOP could have beaten Trump. I see this as a failure in the primary system and the failure of the media and political organizations to connect with people.

We’re in for a turbulent ride, that’s for sure.

I do pray that it won’t be as bad as many think. I can only say I pray that as I think God’s needed to ensure sanity and some peace.

 

Mainly, I’m stunned.

Wow.

Maybe the media will learn not to give the spotlight to every hothead with a big bank account who says something that’ll heighten ratings. Not that the media is the only one at fault, but they bare some responsibility. They egged him on when they broadcast his ridiculous assertions about Obama’s birthplace. They gave him so much attention during the primaries. How I hope they find a way to bring civility back.

That said, I’d like to see our protest take the shape of everyone speaking civilly, refraining from profanity, donning a pocket square, spats, gloves, pearls, whatever you’ve got or can get at a second hand shop, that suggests elegance, restraint and civility.

 

In the Heat of the Night

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In rural Mississippi a local businessman, the most prosperous one in the city, is murdered. The first suspect is a black man waiting for a train. Who’s more vulnerable than an outsider with dark skin in the rural South in the early 1960’s? Thus there’s plenty of drama in In the Heat of the Night (1967).

Virgil Tibbs, played by Sidney Poitier, is waiting for his train. He’s brought in to the station and treated like the prime suspect till the police chief (Rod Steiger) learns that Tibbs is a leading homicide detective in Philadelphia. As much as it bugs the chief, he realizes that his force can’t solve the murder. They just don’t have Tibbs’ expertise. So he gets the Philadelphia Police Department to make Tibbs work with Chief Gillespie and his force.

The film shows the hostility and violence towards an African American whom the locals feel has risen above his station. The mystery is authentic and keeps the audience guessing. Of course Poitier and Steiger give sterling performances.

More Art

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By Edward Hopper

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Entertainment in the 1930’s

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1930s Dystopia visions

Art Institute: America 1930s

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American Cubism

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I got down to the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit of American Art from the 1930s. With the financial crash of 1929, the ’30s or Great Depression was a time when people thought the American “experiment” had failed. Artists addressed this question. Some, like Grant Wood, focused on a romanticized view of rural life, others looked at the city and some painted bleak dystopian scenes.

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by Grant Wood

Good Customer Service

Alas, it’s easy to come across bad customer service in the US. I abhor the automated phone (“Press 1 if you want our address, Press 2 if you want your balance,” etc.) service. I dread calling about problems. When I can, I’ve gone back to writing actual letters to companies. More and more, that’s not even allowed. O, mores! O, tempora!

Today, I called to ask American Express if they’d remove a late charge I incurred because I didn’t get home and see a bill till the day after it was due. Although the service could be better by eliminating the raft of “choices” callers are given and the request for a “security code” which isn’t a password or digits from your social security number so I don’t think I have one so that results in a loop that’s low grade frustrating.

Yet once I got a real live operator the conversation was almost ridiculously positive. Since I was an “outstanding” customer with an “amazing record for paying on time,”   they would wipe away the late fee. The operator could not praise me more for my excellence. It was over the top, but it made the call pleasant rather than a fight.


Another satisfying customer service was with Apple’s telephone service.  I chose the option to have them call me. There was a bit of a fail there as someone else answered the phone and though I hurried, by the time I got to the phone, the robot operator decided no one was there and  didn’t hear me so it hung up. Then I called them back rather than wait 10 minutes.

Apple makes you call them back when they call you, which is somewhat odd. I had to wait for assistance, but Apple gives you a choice of three types of music to listen to as you wait. That’s fairly good. (Though why did you call me, but not have a technician ready?)

The guy who helped me did a stellar job. His communication skills were top notch as he was knowledgeable, patient and sympathetic. We went through some processes with the Disk Utility feature and found out that the El Capitan operating system I’d recently downloaded was corrupted. Before fixing the problem, I had to back up all my files so I had to get a new external hard drive. (My current one had gone kaput.)

Saturday I called Apple back again and the customer service was mediocre. This clerk didn’t have the same communication skills and didn’t listen well so she had me do some of the same time consuming procedures I’d already done. She was reluctant to trust the first guy. She just wound up making a reservation at a Genius Bar where they did fix my computer by uploading El Capitan again.  The “Genius” I spoke with today was as good as good as the first Apple employee I spoke with. They all get extensive training, but the second person didn’t take it to heart the same way.

If you communicate clearly, treat me with respect and do what you say you’ll do, you’re well on your way to good customer service.

 

Poem of the Week

I grabbed this portion of Walt Whitman’s “Leaves of Grass” from The Writer’s Almanac:

This is what you shall do: Love the earth and sun and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every one that asks, stand up for the stupid and crazy, devote your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not concerning God, have patience and indulgence toward the people, take off your hat to nothing known or unknown or to any man or number of men, go freely with powerful uneducated persons and with the young and with the mothers of families, read these leaves in the open air every season of every year of your life, re-examine all you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss whatever insults your own soul; and your very flesh shall be a great poem and have the richest fluency not only in its words but in the silent lines of its lips and face and between the lashes of your eyes and in every motion and joint of your body.

It seemed fitting for July 4th.

Driehaus Museum Tearoom

Now, the price was too rich for my blood ($50) but it does look tempting, not to mention elegant. This tea experience is part of the Driehaus Museum’s Dressing Downton exhibit, a first class showing of the sumptuous clothing of Downton Abbey.

 

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