Happy Thanksgiving

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Wishing you a terrific Thanksgiving!

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History of Thanksgiving


The First Thanksgiving


Kids’ History on Thanksgiving – some of this is right, or close. It’s all very cute.


From the point of view of the rock, Plymouth Rock.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Lights

 

Each week Cee of Cee’s Photography challenges bloggers with a fun prompt. This week we’re to find photos of subjects that depict lights. I found some antique lights as well as a good old-fashioned jack-o-lantern. 

If you want to see more fun photos, click here.

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Poem of the Week, I

Iron

a WWI poem
By Carl Sandburg

GUNS,
Long, steel guns,
Pointed from the war ships
In the name of the war god.
Straight, shining, polished guns,
Clambered over with jackies in white blouses,
Glory of tan faces, tousled hair, white teeth,
Laughing lithe jackies in white blouses,
Sitting on the guns singing war songs, war chanties.

Shovels,
Broad, iron shovels,
Scooping out oblong vaults,
Loosening turf and leveling sod.

I ask you
To witness–
The shovel is brother to the gun.

Abraham’s Well

I just finished my friend, Sharon Ewell Foster’s Abraham’s Well: A Novel. Since I know Sharon and have enjoyed her books set in modern times, Ain’t No River and Ain’t No Valley this work of historical fiction was a departure. I can’t pretend that my review is unbiased so don’t say I didn’t warn readers.

The story reminds me of The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman as it consists of an elderly woman looking back on her life during a significant historical period. Armentia, the main character, is African American and Cherokee. She lives in the 19th (and I suppose early 20th century) experiencing tribal life, slavery, the removal of Cherokee and other native Americans during the Trail of Tears and eventually freedom. It’s the story of an imperfect character, rather than a superhero, finding strength and courage to surmount injustice and hardship. I’m a sucker for such stories.

For me historical fiction succeeds by teaching me and entertaining me and Abraham’s Well does both. Although I’ve read a little about the Trail of Tears and knew that some African American’s are part Native American, I had no knowledge of African American involvement in this chapter of American history. Sharon includes an explanation of why she decided to write about this topic and her family heritage as it relates to the themes of the novel. I found that quite interesting. I could see this making a good movie.

The book reads very fast, as Bridget points out. Bridget’s also right about the chapters on the preaching but there’s probably less church-going in this story than the others I’ve read so I had a different view of that aspect. I didn’t mind it. I realize that Sharon’s fans will be looking for Christian fiction when they decide to read this novel.

Election Judge, 2018

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Monday night I met my team of election judges when we set up the polling place. I was lucky to get a good team of congenial organized peers. Of the five, four of us had experience and the one newbie was cooperative and on the ball. Some polling places had no one with experience. That’s tough because there are details not covered in training that help things move along smoothly. For example, since we have to account for every ballot, used and not, one judge knew to tell us to count the ballots in each package we opened. There should be 50, but often there were 49 or 48. At the end of the night if you thought there were 50, your count would be off.

Getting up at 4 am is never my idea of fun, but all the judges do so. Some if they live far from their assigned location was up earlier. Forgive me for tooting my own horn, but thousands of citizens do so so others can vote before work. In Illinois polls open at 6 and it takes an hour to do the Election Day prep.

There’s a lot of clerical work to get right and I’d say we did a fine job. It was satisfying to get all the thank you’s we received. Americans, by and large, are a grateful people. It sure helps to hear that “Thank you” when you’re trying to do your work or putting a bandage on your fifth paper cut.

I enjoy seeing all the people who bring their kids to the polls to show toddlers or teens how the system works. One woman brought the ten kids in her at-home day care to the polls. At that time we had about 5 other kids under age 5 in the cosy field house that served as a polling place. That was a surprise. It worked and no one complained about the squealing kids so I have to say our voters are able to do their civic duty without complaining about noise that just comes with sharing a public space.

I was happy about the many first time voters. Usually, they weren’t young, but were just compelled by a family member to do their part.

We’ll get more analysis, perhaps too much, in the days ahead. Some races you’re probably happy with and others you aren’t but I’m happy that we get to go through this process. That’s not to say, I don’t welcome a respite from campaign ads, I suppose we all are.

Thursday Door Challenge

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Someone suggested I join Norm’s Thursday Door Challenge, so I’m sharing some Halloween doors. You can check out more doors on Norm’s blog here.

 

Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).