Memorial Day Concert

I watch this marvelous PBS concert every year. The tributes to individual members of the service and their spouses are outstanding and represent the many who sacrificed just as much. The music is superb and very fitting. The cast includes “Joe Mantegna and Mary McCormack and features an all-star lineup of actors and musicians along with top pops conductor Jack Everly and the National Symphony Orchestra.”

Take a look. Have some tissue handy as you may need to wipe away a tear.

Reference

PBS.com on YouTube.

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Klavan on Journalists Risking “All” . . .

I have to agree with Andrew Klavan. Journalists need to get a grip and give more time to what’s happening in Isreal and Venezuela and stop giving so much time on the Mueller Report that anyone can read here.

Harrington’s Commonplaces

Some wise sayings from a teacher I once had at Act One:

“What gets us over our terror? …Love for someone else.”
(14 January 2019)

“There is no joy without commitment, but commitment implies renunciation of other things.” (15 January 2019)

“There’s no growth without tension.” (15 January 2019)

“One sign of growth is that you always have new problems.” (17 January 2019)

“At what point does your character become your fate?” (22 January 2019)

“The reactive person is not in control.” (22 January 2019)

“Some fights are worth losing.” (29 January 2019)

“The gods that we worship determine the values we hold.” (31 January 2019)

“A lie in the brain is getting a fact wrong; a lie in the soul is getting a life wrong.” (31 January 2019)

“A truly educated person is one who pauses.” (4 February 2019)

“You have to be willing to be wrong to be wrong
.” (4 February 2019)

“The mark of a grownup is flexibility.” (5 February 2019)

“The first sign of God’s will for us is the gifts He’s given us.” (5 February 2019)

“Safety isn’t part of the Christian dispensation. Martyrdom is.” (7 February 2019)

 
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Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

If we were having coffee, I’d tell you that, of course, I survived the so-called Polar Vortex, which was frigid. Luckily, we had heat continually, which wasn’t the case with parts of the town south of me. Imagine losing heat when it’s -10°F/-23°C. Some people lost heat in the middle of the night for hours. Now it’s 35°F and it feels balmy.

Last Monday my car wouldn’t start after work. Luckily, my brother lives near that library and he came to my rescue. The car was towed to a repair shop, but they couldn’t look at it till Thursday, when they discovered it was a problem with the electronic key mechanism. Go figure. We had other keys so all’s well. Since he was so helpful with the car, I made my brother a pecan pie.

I have discovered that Hoopla Digital offers many of the Great Courses courses. I’ve happened on one about Mental Math, multiplying double digits like 36 x 78 or adding 395 +882+130 in your head. The professor Alexander Benjamin, PhD teaches at Harvey Mudd College and is quite engaging. mental math keeps your brain sharp and isn’t as hard as you think.

I watched Cary Grant in The Batchelor and the Bobby-Soxer and just finished Heart Beats Loud last night. Both were pure entertainment, but I’d say the former was the better film.

 

 

Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

If we were having coffee, I’d tell you that I’m looking outside my window at a a beautiful snowfall. It’s graceful and serene.

On Saturday my friend Maryann drove down from Wisconsin and we went to lunch at Michael Jordan’s Steak House before going to the Art Institute of Chicago’s exhibit of Ukiyo-e paintings. All the paintings came from the Weston collection. Ukiyo-e art depicts the “water trade” or the life of musicians, dancers, geishas, and concubines of the era from the 16th to early 19th centuries.

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I’ve started reading Crazy, Rich Asians, which has been flying off the shelves. Colline of Colline’s Blog recently finished it and that convinced me to get the book. I’m also loving Arnold Bennett’s The Old Wives’ Tale, which offers a witty look at small town 19th century middle class.

I did get a promotion at work, which goes into effect next week. In addition to assisting patrons, I’ll do more reference work and work on projects reaching out to local businesses and to seniors. Alas, I did not get the other job. A friend at that library mentioned that when she was who did get it, she realized that it was a foregone conclusion. There are a few more jobs, again all part time, that I’ll apply to. Fingers crossed.

Weekend Coffee Share

wordswag_15073188796611453091488Weekend Coffee Share is a time for us to take a break out of our lives and enjoy some time catching up with friends (old and new)!

If we were having coffee, I’d tell you that I’ve caught a cold and have been mainly staying home, drinking tea, reading a bit and resting.

I did read the selection for this month’s Great Books discussion at the library. We read and discussed Darwin’s Moral Sense of Man, rather a dry read in my opinion. I do accept Darwin’s ideas, which I think are pervasive nowadays, but I’m not all that interested in natural history, which he describes in detail. I did appreciate a woman who clarified the idea of Natural Selection. I mistakenly thought our choices in mates and behavior determined the survival of the fittest, but it’s all about how nature chooses. We’re just little pawns as far as that goes. Our group leader rambled a lot and as has become usual the discussion goes all over the place with tangents like robots and Trump getting mixed in. The Great Books Foundation aims to gather people to discuss an influential text and stick to analyzing it and not roaming all over the place, which is too easy to do.

I ran into a childhood friend’s mother at the library. Her daughter an I were great friends from first to third grade. In fourth grade I changed schools and later I moved so we lost touch. It was nice to hear a little bit about Laura and what she’s doing now. I do hope my old friend drops by one day.

There’s a new opening at my library and Wednesday I’ll interview for this position, which is a step up, but alas still part time. still my fingers are crossed. I haven’t heard from the other library yet about whom they’ve chosen. Skokie’s a well respected library so I know it’s quite competitive.

I’ve been quite disappointed with PBS NewsHour, which I count on as a sound news source, but they were in error twice last week. First they broadcast the Buzzfeed story that Cohen testified that President Trump told him to lie. The Mueller team soon stated that this was not the case. While the story was amended, I’d love to see an apology tonight and a statement that they should have investigated the veracity of Buzzfeed’s report, which was written by a known plagiarizer. Next there’s the mess with the boys from the Catholic school and a stand off involving a Native American man and the Black Hebrews. Originally, the boys were reported to mock the Native American and to be troublemakers. Later a more complete video was shared online and it became clear that the boys weren’t in the wrong. Again, the media, including PBS rushed to boradcast a story before they found out all the facts. It’s disgraceful because these errors impact people’s reputations or understanding of the  government.  With the boys, people have contacted the colleges they applied to and asked that these kids get rejected. They’ve discovered their contact information and have harassed and threatened them and their relatives. A mob mentality has been unleashed and it’s hard to contain it. Again, I hope to see PBS and other channels apologize and vow to adhere to a higher standard.

I got the Moone Boy series DVDs and finally saw the final series. I love this Irish sitcom, about pre-teen Martin Moone and his imaginary friend Sean. It’s not to be missed.

Poem of the Week

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The Snow

by Emily Dickinson

It sifts from leaden sieves,
It powders all the wood,
It fills with alabaster wool
The wrinkles of the road.
It makes an even face
Of mountain and of plain, —
Unbroken forehead from the east
Unto the east again.
It reaches to the fence,
It wraps it, rail by rail,
Till it is lost in fleeces;
It flings a crystal veil
On stump and stack and stem, —
The summer’s empty room,
Acres of seams where harvests were,
Recordless, but for them.
It ruffles wrists of posts,
As ankles of a queen, —
Then stills its artisans like ghosts,
Denying they have been.