Today I Made

Today I made two green bean casseroles, a pecan pie and figured out how to create videos out of PowerPoint.

The library troubles in these parts continue. The speakers at the October meeting asked that what they said be included in the minutes in full. Then we saw the minutes and bland generalities were written instead of what was said. At the meeting last week we asked that the minutes be transcribed into the minutes so there was an accurate account of what was said.

The Library Board President refused the request. (The Board has to keep a recording of the minutes for several months so this could be done.)

The Board did agree to post the full recording of the meeting online. Well, they probably figured who’s going to listen to a recording that lasts over 2 hours.

I figured out how to download the recording, edit it so you could hare just the key public comments. Then I created PowerPoint slides with what was written in the minutes with recordings of what was actually said.

 

The Wickham’s

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Building on Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, The Wickham’s: Pemberley at Christmas is a cute, clever play. Impetuous, silly Lydia is still head over heels for her her heel of a husband George Wickham, who’s still philandering and gambling, though she doesn’t see it. She believes her husband really is away working hard to earn a fortune for her.

Ha! Wake up, Lydia.

Set in the kitchen of Pemberly, Darcy’s family estate, the story revolves around poor Lydia’s awful marriage with a subplot about a new kitchen maid and her old friend, Brian who aspires to be an inventor. Modern themes of women working and innovation flavor the story.

Elizabeth is in a tizzy because her silly relatives may spoil a well-ordered Christmas, which has been the norm at Pemberly. Things take a turn for the worse when George Wickham, cad extraordinaire surprises  the family when he shows up drunk and disorderly after a bar brawl. The housekeeper, staff and Elizabeth try in vain to keep him under wrap, which never works out in a holiday tale.

What’s worse is minutes later the maid discovers an incriminating letter in Wickham’s pocket. Secrets are revealed and scandal must be avoided — if it can.

This play is the second in a trilogy, but you can follow the plot if you missed the first one and perhaps if you haven’t read or seen Pride and Prejudice, but if you haven’t read Pride and Prejudice, you certainly should. It’s a favorite of mine.

The costumes and setting were spot on. The acting was good, though Wickham and Darcy seemed too stiff. Jane Austen’s wit is perfect and I can’t say the writing measured up to Austen, but it was fun. The characters were modernized to appeal to current playgoers, which I didn’t need. Still the show as clever and charmed me.

Which Way Challenge

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The Which Way Challenge, that Cee began, has been picked up by the Alive and Trekking blogger.  The beauty of it is that it’s free form. You can include images of doors, gates, roads, streets, exits, signs, paths, waterways, you name it.

See more Which Way photos by clicking here.

Forest Bathing

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I just got home from my first Japanese Forest Bath. My local library organized the event and when the weather got cold and it snowed someone backed out and I was moved off the waiting list.

I met a group of 12 or so at Ryerson Woods. It was rather cold but much of the week’s snow had melted and the foliage was gorgeous.

The practice of Forest Bathing, we were told started when suicides spiked in Japan. A forest ranger figured perhaps we could prevent these suicides by taking people into the forest for slow, meditative walks. He found some people who were troubled and in danger of taking their lives and he led them on slow walks in the woods. These groups did not commit suicide at the level of those with out this “treatment.”

What did we do? We met at the beginning of an easy trail and were instructed just to breathe deeply and look around us. After a while we were guided to walk very slowly in the woods and notice movement. The leader would then signal us to gather in a circle and share what we noticed. There’s an option to pass. We continued in this manner walking very slowly and paying attention to sounds or contrasts or something the guide suggested and then gathering to share what we noticed.

I do feel renewed from the experience. It’s purifying. I wish we had less sharing because some people went on and on and got rather scientific, while I’d have preferred people sharing just a word or nothing. I found this an excellent practice and one I’d do on my own or with a group again.

Which Way Challenge

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The Which Way Challenge, that Cee began, has been picked up by the Alive and Trekking blogger.  The beauty of it is that it’s free form. You can include images of doors, gates, roads, streets, exits, signs, paths, waterways, you name it.

My photos this week are from my walk through the Chicago Botanical Gardens today.

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See more Which Way photos by clicking here.

Which Way Challenge

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The Which Way Challenge, that Cee began, has been picked up by the Alive and Trekking blogger.  The beauty of it is that it’s free form. You can include images of doors, gates, roads, streets, exits, signs, paths, waterways, you name it.

See more Which Way photos by clicking here.