Sepia Saturday

2003517 : Sepia Saturday 514 : Woman Sitting In A Chair (EP20.003)

A portrait of a lady. That’s how I see this week’s prompt. So I searched through the archives and my own photos of portraits of ladies.

From Flickr Commons:

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US National Archives, 1863

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SMU Archives, 1970

 

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US National Archives, 1863

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Library of Congress – Lady Conan Doyle, 1920

From my archives:

Arcadia

Clever, but sterile, Tom Stoppard’s play Arcadia didn’t grab me. I could appreciate the weaving together of characters from the 19th and 20th century, but the play never grabbed me or carried me away. One part of the play focuses on a precocious young lady who exasperates both her lascivious tutor and her mother; the other looks at a small group of annoyed and annoying modern intellectuals who bicker about Lord Byron and their professions. While the play won awards, I wouldn’t run to a theater to see it. In fact I’ve never seen it advertised so I assume it’s not going to be a classic.

St. John Cantius

Today’s the last day of the Christmas when we heard the gospel about when Christ was baptized before he began his public life. I went to St. John Cantius for mass (in Latin no less) so I could see some Christmas decorations before they’re put in storage for another 11 months.

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It’s another one of the 11 recommended Chicago churches to visit. I agree wholeheartedly. Visiting St. John Cantius is like taking a trip to Europe. The Baroque architecture is glorious. This mass had a professional level cantor and choir. The organ music was wonderful.

Participating in a Latin mass was like a trip back in time. They have missals with both Latin and English. The homily was meaningful and memorable. What more can you ask for?

Joffrey’s The Nutcracker

I’m blown away by Joffrey Ballet’s The Nutcracker. What makes this version stand out is that it’s set in Chicago, on Christmas Eve before the Columbian Exposition of 1893.

The shift from Germany to old Chicago was a brilliant idea. Clara’s family is poor and she lives with her family in a (very large) cabin for construction workers. The story remains essentially the same. For Christmas, Clara (aka Marie in some versions) receives a beloved nutcracker, which is broken by her rambunctious brother Fritz. Drama ensues and when Clara finally goes to sleep she has fantastic dreams of the Columbian Exhibition’s White City with Buffalo Bill dancing and a slew of performers from all corners of the globe.

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Tchaikovsky’s music is among my most favorite and is well known even to people who don’t follow classical music. It’s played beautifully by the Chicago Symphony.

The setting and special effects were magical using projected archival images from the actual World’s Fair. The sets in both acts were creative and captivating.

I loved seeing all the young girls dressed up to see this ballet. Their excitement rubbed off on me.

This is a must-see show.

Sepia Saturday

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This week I’m inspired to find some equine photos. How were horses used way back when? Let’s see what I found on Flickr Commons.

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State Library of Queensland, 1920

I thought 1920 was rather late for such transport.

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The Library of Virginia, 1958

That’s not a typo on my part. Check the source. It says this photo of a horse & Richmond Ice wagon is from 1958.

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Smithsonian Museum, 1864

This Union Army mail wagon was used in the Civil War.

If you’d like to see more Sepia Saturday photos, click here.