About smkelly8

writer, teacher, movie lover, traveler, reader

The Hustler (1961)

With Paul Newman playing Fast Eddie Felson, a young, swaggering hot shot, The Hustler is more about character than competition. At the start of the film, Eddie strolls into a dive pool hall looking for Minnesota Fats (Jackie Gleason). Fats is the champ of champs in pool. He agrees to play Eddie who in a marathon session has won $18,000. Fats is ready to call it a night, but Eddie, who’s been guzzling whiskey, insists on continuing the game. By the next morning, Fats has defeated intemperate Eddie, who leaves in shame. Observing all this is Bert Gordon, gambler and manager who knows it all. Before Eddie’s out the door, Bert imparts some pearls of wisdom about character. As Bert sees it Eddie’s got talent, but that doesn’t make you a winner, strong character does.

The Hustler isn’t so much about pool as it is about character. We don’t see as many great shots as I expected and often the score isn’t clearly stated. What we’re to watch for is Eddie’s character.

The middle of the film centers on Eddie meeting the equally melancholy drifter Sarah (Piper Laurie), who drinks too much and hangs out at the bus station where she isn’t judges and where she can get a drink at all hours. Sarah is pretty but sad. She’s a habitual liar without direction. She’s lame, but has pride. She’s very hurt and damaged by life and so is Eddie. Water seeks its own level and their love is based on sharing the pains that come with getting kicked around and lacking the wisdom from a mentor, parent or worldview that helps a person weather life’s storms and accept responsibility.

After a kind of honeymoon period, Eddie returns to the pool halls where his talent gets him victory and his bravado gets his thumbs broken. He heals under Sarah’s care, but is drawn back to hustling. Burt lures him to Louisville where Eddie believes he can win big. Burt offers wisdom, but he’s essentially a serpent whose main concern is his own wallet.

The Hustler is a dark film full of melancholy, but gripped me. Newman, Laurie, Scott and Gleason all put in excellent performances, which garnered four of the film’s nine Oscar nominations. While it’s a dark film, it wasn’t too depressing. Still you might like some lighter fare during the quarantine.

Christianity in Japan

This young woman put together a documentary on Japan’s relationship to Christianity, how its perceived, what Japanese people do believe and how Christians are received in the Land of the Rising Sun.

When I lived there, Christianity was perceived as a foreign religion and as the video states only 1% of the population believes in it. Still because its a densely populated country, I did find churches near me.

I attended Buddhist and Shinto festivals, but as the documentary shows people tended to do them because they were traditions not because they actually believed them or knew their origins. At temples people would post their prayer petitions and people do donate to support their temples, in fact there’s great social pressure to tithe.

Thursday Door Challenge

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Hosted by Norm 2.0, Thursday Doors is a weekly feature allowing door lovers to come together to admire and share their favorite door photos from around the world. Feel free to join in on the fun by creating your own Thursday Doors post each week and then sharing it, between Thursday morning and Saturday noon (North American Eastern Time).

Click here, to see more links to doors.

Poem of the Week

COVID 19, #1

By J’Ann Schoonmaker, my friend

I cried this morning,
remembered to breathe,
opened the door:
Trees still standing,
pale blue sky,
wispy clouds skirting tree tops:
Nothing foreign here.
Daffodils wave
in breezes born
from the west:
Nothing new here.
Tulip buds grow larger
fanning green leaves
bursting to bloom:
Nothing stagnant here.
What else must I notice
this, only, our eighth day of
sheltering in place?