CDP Theme Day: Teach

As school starts . . .

Beijing Daily Photo 2

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As students in the northern hemisphere head back to school, the City Daily Photo September theme is aptly teach.

To see more teaching posts, click here.

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Cee’s Which Way Challenge

 

 

On Friday’s Cee challenged bloggers to post photos that depict ways, paths, roads, taken and not.

Since Cee is super busy not just blogging but caring for an adorable, yet ill dog, she’s cutting back on challenges, but I like this one so I put one up for the week.
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Fantastic Fiction

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I just learned about a phenomenal website for readers who love fiction. It’s Fantastic Fiction and it’s a treasure trove containing an exhaustive amount of content on authors and books of all genres. Genres featured include everything from mysteries and sagas to urban literature and paranormal romance.

You can find new books by looking at books your favorite authors have suggested or by looking at what other users viewed that view one of your favorite books.

Librarians use is extensively when they suggest books.

Fantastic Fiction was started as a hobby and now a full time business for Dave Wand and his small crew.

Word of the Week

Bibliophagist n. : an avid or voracious reader

I’d never herd this word until I clicked on one of the blogger’s profile photos who liked yesterday’s post. What an apt word. I sure admire her vocabulary.

Sample sentences:

Like many bibliophagists, Dirda sometimes has an excessively romantic view of the power of the page. —Kirkus Reviews, 1 Mar. 2006

Once you had got through Pooh and Dr. Dolittle, Alice and the Water Babies, you were a bibliophagist on the loose. —Nadine Gordimer, Telling Times: Writing and Living, 1954–2008, 2010

Reference

Bibliophagist. (n.d.). https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bibliophagist retrieved on August 31, 2018

The Screwtape Letters

screwtape-lettersC.S. Lewis’ The Screwtape Letters has been on my mental list of books I should read for years. Boy, do I regret not getting to this witty, wise book sooner.

Written from the point of view of a modern devil, Lewis’ book is a collection of letters between Screwtape, an uncle mentoring Wormwood, a young tempter as he tries to win a human over to the side of evil. The letters are clever as well as perceptive. Screwtape must make his thoughts on temptation and salvation clear to Wormwood, who’s something of a blockhead. Screwtape makes it crystal clear that for the Devil to win, he doesn’t care about the “quality” of the fallen as much as about the quantity and the modern world where people’s thinking have become sloppy and morality fuzzy, allows for evil to win boatloads of souls. The book takes you on an interesting journey as Wormwood bungles his mission.

Reading from Screwtape’s point of view was tricky. I had to constantly remind myself that for him the “Enemy” was God and that he flipped his opinion of Above (heaven) and Below (hell). I’m used to seeing as the Above being the home of the good guys.

Much of the book examines modern British society’s failings but Lewis’ criticisms are still true, at least they fit in the US where morals have been shrugged aside as irrelevant, education’s been watered down and the word “democracy” is misunderstood.

Here are a few quotations:

“Indeed the safest road to Hell is the gradual one–the gentle slope, soft underfoot, without sudden turnings, without milestones, without signposts,…Your affectionate uncle, Screwtape.”

“It is funny how mortals always picture us as putting things into their minds: in reality our best work is done by keeping things out.”

“Courage is not simply one of the virtues but the form of every virtue at the testing point, which means at the point of highest reality.”

“Prosperity knits a man to the world. He feels that he is finding his place in it, while really it is finding its place in him.”

“When two humans have lived together for many years it usually happens that each has tones of voice and expressions of face which are almost unendurably irritating to the other. Work on that. Bring fully into the consciousness of your patient that particular lift of his mother’s eyebrows which he learned to dislike in the nursery, and let him think how much he dislikes it. Let him assume that she knows how annoying it is and does it to annoy – if you know your job he will not notice the immense improbability of the assumption. And, of course, never let him suspect that he has tones and looks which similarly annoy her. As he cannot see or hear himself, this easily managed.”

For Job Hunters

One thing that’s rather new when it comes to job hunting is that computers scan and sort applicants’ resumes. How do you know how to make it past the software?

I got some tips on this topic at a job hunting session given by the state at a local library.

To ace this step in the job hunting process:

  • Remove any text in the header because the program won’t read it.
  • Upload your resume without any bolding or formatting and save it as a text file. Upload the ugly file on the company sites directly and also upload your pretty resume or give some to the people whom you meet at an interview.
  • Don’t format your resume as a table or with tabs since this messes up how your resume will be read. The software that’s reading your resume reads from top to bottom, not across. I had used tabs and the dates were on the right side of the entry.
  • Use an online tool that compares your resume to the job description. The organization you’re applying to input keywords that they want the program to look for. You can’t know with certainty what they are but the best hint you’ve got is the job description.

One such tool is Jobscan. You upload your resume and the job description, press scan and voila, you see how well you match the job.

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Sample Jobscan results

The man leading this program suggested using a word cloud generator like Wordle.com to make a similar comparison. If the keywords in both the resume and job search are approximately the same size, you can figure you’re chances are good that you’ll get called.