Floriole

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On Webster Street near DePaul, Floriole offers a beautiful setting for its coffee, bakery goods and food. The decor is warm and modern.

I was prepared to love this spot, which was new to me. However, my quiche was so disappointing. In fact, it was the worst I’d ever had. The Starbucks in China offer consistently good quiche for less. How I missed it. This quiche was very custardy or gooey in a way that didn’t appeal to me at all. I ate about half and didn’t enjoy the egg part at all. The price was more than double Starbucks. Also, it’s a place where there’s no table service.

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The Unappealing Quiche

I should have gone up to complain, but I didn’t want to make a fuss. My introversion got in the way. It’s a shame they don’t have employees asking if everything’s alright. I probably would have mentioned the quiche and given them a chance to make me more satisfied.

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hot cider

Their hot apple cider was good, but smaller than I expected for the price.

I might go back, but I’d order something different.

 

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El Candidato

From a wealthy family, Martin decides to enter politics. We’re never told which office he’s running. El Candidato, an Argentinian film, begins with a strategy meeting as his team tries to figure out how to present Martin and incorporate the trendy environmental themes and present a winning political message although Martin himself isn’t clear where he stands. When asked if he’s left or right, center left or center right, Martin asks the new graphic artist.

The graphic artist is probably in his twenties and isn’t sure of his own political leanings. He’s not working for Martin because of a shared philosophy. He’s there to make money and during the first meeting, Martin, who can lip read, calls him out when he whispers a comment to his neighbor implying that Martin’s probably a rich simpleton.

Far from simple, Martin is a sympathetic character. He’s no Latin Donald Trump. He doesn’t exactly know why he’s running for office and part of the reason is no doubt his father issues, but his unwillingness to choose a spot on the political spectrum has to do with how crazy and ineffective politics is.

We soon learn that Laura, a senior team member and the man she hired to do sound work for the ads, are in cahoots and are collecting dirt and hacking Martin’s social media to insure he loses. Thus the story is about trust and betrayal rather than politics.

The film takes place during a few days of intensive planning in seclusion at Martin’s vast ranch.

The unpredictable end blew me away and reminded me a bit of The Rules of the Game.

Here’s the film, but there are no English subtitles. Sorry.

El Candidato from Delfin on Vimeo.

Not Garrison

Boy, the accusations are piling up. That doesn’t surprise me. I worked in Hollywood in the 1980s. But I was surprised to wake up to hearing about Matt Lauer getting fired. I’m not sure what happened. I suppose that will come to light. It seems true, whatever the story.

Now I just heard that Garrison Keillor, writer and creator of The Prairie Home Companion has been fired because a woman has come forward with a story of sexual harassment. It’s sad. I hope it’s not true, but I hoped that Bill Cosby was innocent and he wasn’t.

I hope we create better work environments and a return to civility where this isn’t rampant. I guess we all do. I hope we know enough about what happened so we can figure out what as a society needs to be done.

Jeremy Piven was accused and took a polygraph test. The results showed that he wasn’t lying when he said the allegations were false. You can’t be proven innocent, but I think this is as good as you can get unless you go through the legal system, which isn’t perfect either.

I’d like Garrison to take a polygraph test.

Without knowing the particulars, I’m surprised that people are getting fired without due process, which can be a hearing and not necessarily a court case. I don’t want to defend a sexual predator, but it seems these people should be put on leave and have their due process and then if they’re in the wrong, then fire them.

What times we live in!

 

Weekly Photo Challenge: Serene

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Just chillin’

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Wednesday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announce
ments, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Just a few wonderful posts:

Social Media Gaffs Cost Jobs

This was in my textbook on Project Management:

Ninety-three percent of employers check social media profiles of prospective hires. According to Money magazine here are the 10 most common reasons a candidate’s blunders on social media cost the person a job:

  1. Posting something embarrassing on the corporate Twitter feed.
  2. Sexual oversharing
  3. Revealing company secrets
  4. Blowing your own cover*
  5. Talking “smack” about a job you haven’t accepted yet
  6. Making fun of clients or donors
  7. Making fun of your boss or team
  8. Posting while you should be working
  9. Complaining about your job
  10. Drinking in a photo — even if you’re over 21

So you’ve been warned. I’m sure the sexual oversharing is not going to help anyone in the post-Harvey Weinstein-era, and it shouldn’t.

*Unless you work for the CIA, I’m not sure what’s meant by “Blowing your own cover.” Comment below if you do.

References

Poppick, S. (Sept. 5, 2014). “10 Social Media Blunders that Cost a Millennial a Job–or Worse. Money Magazine. Quoted in Information Technology Project Management by Kathy Schwalbe, Cengage Learning, 2015.

Baseball Trainer?

I just got an email from Ziprecruiter suggesting I apply for a job their algorithm thinks lines up with my background. I click and get to a job posting for a Baseball Trainer. I can’t remember the last time I played baseball. Maybe that was when I was in my early 20s and played softball. If softball doesn’t count, I haven’t played since high school.

Woe is me.

Ziprecruiter is not alone. It’s given my email information to numerous websites, like Indeed, Handshake or SmartHire, who bombard me with jobs teaching physics, chemistry, special ed or accounting among other fields I have no expertise in. Some refinement is needed.

My first choice for a job is a librarian position. Yesterday I had a good long talk with my mother’s friend whose husband was the head of Northwestern’s library. After the holidays, she’s going to introduce me to some people there. Fingers crossed.

My fingers are also crossed for a job as a librarian who coordinates the ESL/Literacy program at a public library in the northwest suburbs.

Of course, I’m also hopeful for a writing opportunity.