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Weekly Photo Challenge: Structure

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1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Wednesday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

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Travel Theme: Animal Companions

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In response to Ailsa’s prompt this week, I’m sharing photos of the public art campaign in Chicago this summer. These artsy dogs commemorate police dogs.

What does Animal Companions make you think of? If you fancy exploring the unfamiliar, exotic and unknown for this week’s travel theme (everyone’s welcome!) here’s what to do:

  1. Create your own post and title it Travel Theme: Animal Companion
  2. Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
  3. Watch out for the next travel theme which will come out next weekend
  4. Don’t forget to subscribe to keep up to date on the latest weekly travel themes.
  5. Sign up via the email subscription link in the sidebar or RSS.
    ❤ Ailsa of Where’s My Backpack?

Poem of the Week

To Boredom

by Charles Simic

I’m the child of rainy Sundays.
I watched time crawl
Like an injured fly
Over the wet windowpane.
Or waited for a branch
On a tree to stop shaking,
While Grandmother knitted
Making a ball of yarn
Roll over like a kitten at her feet.
I knew every clock in the house
Had stopped ticking
And that this day will last forever.

Silent Sunday

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Hopscotch

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Starring Walter Matthau, Glenda Jackson, Sam Waterson and Ned Beatty, Hopscotch (1980) entertains with wry, sometimes corny humor and a clever cat and mouse plot. Matthau plays Kendig, a top CIA operative who bugs the big boss and plays by his own rules. Beatty plays the big boss who intends to place Kendig in a desk job till he retires. Kendig won’t have it. He shreds his personnel file and goes on the run. His first stop is to meet Isobel, his lover from way back when. There’s plenty of witty repartee between them. Isobel often plays the mother to Kendig’s naughty boy, but underneath her stern façade Isobel thoroughly enjoys Kendig’s antics.

Beatty plays Myerson, the consummate manager, who has no imagination and follows everything by the book. He’s certainly a stereotype, but as the movie hops along and a good clip, I didn’t mind. The film’s aim is to entertain, nothing more.

Sam Waterson plays Cutter, a fan of Kendig, who’ll take his mentor’s job and who’s sent to track down Kendig. Cutter admires Kendig and doesn’t feel Kendig deserves a desk, but he follows orders and hops around Europe and the U.S. trying to catch Kendig.

The ending provides a nice surprise, and though some of the dialog now seems stilted. It’s a shock that a few decades ago Hopscotch got an R rating. Now you’d hear the few profanities and see the little love scenes on TV during what was the “Family Hour.”

I liked how Kendig represented the experienced, skilled older professional who’s value is undervalued.

Sepia Saturday

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Graceful Carriage is the theme. It’s something I wish I had more of. Here’s three photos I found on Flickr Commons that capture the theme. If you’d like to see more responses to the prompt, click here.

I hope you enjoy them.

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Source: Archives Reykjaviku, n.d.

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National Science and Media Museum, 1935

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Jewish Historical Society, 1950

Interviews with North Koreans

A must see. Just incredible to go through these experiences.

Being a woman in North Korea is worse than I thought.

Thank you, Asian Boss, for these outstanding videos.

Find of the Week: Snazzy Labs

I’ve discovered a helpful YouTube channel for anyone with a computer that they want to use better or to fix. Focusing on Macs, Snazzy Labs offers helpful information to make using a computer more fun or efficient.

Check it out!

 

“Discharged”

I haven’t been very public about this but three weeks ago, after a wonderful culminating event at my summer volunteer teacher training, I opened an email from my job saying that they didn’t think they could get me a visa in time (hogwash — you can get one in 4 days or if you go to Hong Kong first 36 hours) so I wouldn’t be able to return to China to teach.

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It was quite a shock and while I’m not still reeling from this, it still is hard to take. What’s more I had a job offer in June, but I decided to stay where I was. Blasted! I should have changed. Now that it’s too late for that job.

I did email back (one day I’ll post the cold toned email I received) to clear up any “misunderstanding” about when I could submit my passport for the visa. I was able to do so August 7th, when last year they didn’t even ask for it till August 16th.

(Yes, last year there were delays and we were all late, but as I wrote you can expedite the process and get one in a few days as I’ve said.)

I asked about jobs at the home campus, but there are none and I asked if I could return to China in the spring, but never got a reply.

Considering that my colleague, who was an exemplary teacher, but vocal about the problems in our program was not asked back, I’m not surprised. I too was vocal and raised issues, like we need a curriculum. (Our program had a que sera sera curriculum where our employer left all the details of the courses up to us. That allows for a lot of creativity, but there should be some framework, not just a textbook. In October, when I asked about putting together a curriculum, I was told that my employer “didn’t have enough skin in the game.” Huh? It’s not a game. Besides, as one former colleague estimated, the university probably earns $1,000,000. So you think they could invest something in their China programs. It seems right.

As a colleague said, “How is X University even accredited?”) Other issues I’ll write about at a later date.

I have been busy job hunting and have focused on library jobs since I’m almost done with that Masters. I’ve also done a lot of writing, revising one project and starting others. I was bound to leave China at some point, but I wish I had more time to job hunt — and a chance to send all my valued belongings back to the US. I’ve got an apartment full of belongings, some meaningful and important and others household goods I can give away. I haven’t gotten around to figuring out when I can take care of that.

Prayers and good wishes are most welcome.

 

Army of Shadows

An amazingly powerful film, Army of Shadows shows the ordinary people joined the French Resistance and courageously opposed the Germans during WWII.

From the solemn beginning with German soldiers goose-stepping in front of the Arc de Triomphe to the bitter end, when . . . oh, I won’t say, Army of Shadows grabbed me.

After the opening sequence, we meet Gerbier, who’s sitting in the back of a German truck getting transported to a prison camp. Scenes of ordinariness follow. The truck driver makes a stop to pick up provisions from a farmer. Gerbier’s guard makes small talk to let Gerbier know he’s going to a “good” prison camp. At the camp, Gerbier is housed with two groups of prisoners, the first three amuse themselves with dominos and chit chat and seem to be and to have been men who just go with the flow. The other two prisoners are a young communist and a dying Catholic teacher. The division reflects French society, two groups, one that’s earnest and sickly and the other that’s lively, but superficial. Neither one gets much accomplished. Thus Gerbier sets his own course and doesn’t join either “side.” He’s the lone, strong, sensible man.

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Gerbier is transported to the Nazi headquarters and manages to escape. Then as he meets the other members of the Resistance, we watch as Gerbier leads a plot to abduct and kill the young man, who betrayed the Resistance. ordinary people plan and organize what would be criminal acts they’d never undertake in ordinary circumstances.

All the actors deliver compelling performances. The story presents a fascinating look at history and was quite controversial when it was released in France in 1969. Critics were divided on the film because of its controversial portrayal of the Resistance fighters, who sometimes act like very intelligent gangsters.

What’s amazing about the film is how little action it contains. In certain instances there are chases and attacks, but that’s subordinate to the characters’ thinking, sacrifice and courage.

This film was so compelling that after I finished watching I started watching again, this time with the commentary running.

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