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So Satisfied

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As it turns out, this mundane object has given me a great deal of satisfaction. As I said last week, my power cord broke while I’m in Indonesia, far from an Apple store or Best Buy. However, some YouTubers showed me that these cords can be fixed. I asked around and sure enough a student knew where to get this fixed. He refused to take any money, but I get this repair cost less than even the new generic cords that sell for $25. This sort of savings really satisfies me.

An ugly entry for this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge.

Click here if you want to see a video on how these are fixed.

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Silent Sunday

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SilentSunday

The Rules of the Game

Rules

I had to watch The Rules of the Game under strange circumstances. My DVD only would play the film with the commentary going. Thus I read the subtitles and once in a while got a snippet of dialog without English commentary. I prefer first viewings without the expert’s take, but perhaps in this complex film the commentary was best.

 

Jean Renoir’s The Rules of the Game depicts two parallel classes, the upper middle class and the servant class. From the bourgeois Christine, Robert’s Austrian wife has disappointed her would-be lover Andre, an aviator who’s just completed a round the world journey. Andre gets no satisfaction from the clamoring crowd or the inquisitive press. Christine didn’t come so the whole flight was for nought.

Christine’s been in her Parisian home with her husband Robert and her maid Lisette. Robert’s tiring of his lover Genevieve and Lisette’s tired of her husband Schumacher. All are leaving for the countryside where a web of relationships will tangle creating a fine mess pulling the film from farce to tragedy with a surprise ending.

Renoir saw WWII coming. He also saw his society drunk on frivolity, careening over an edge. The Rules of the Game is a rare film that begins with light-hearted, harmless fun, but ends with broken hearts and a tragic death. The characters who all play at love see the consequence of their erroneous worldview.

The film is beautiful and many scenes are complex dances. Renoir was ambitious to offer such sophistication and it wasn’t till decades after it was made that The Rules of the Game was considered a masterpiece, one of the finest movies of all time.

If you think you’ve seen the actor playing Robert before, you have. He was ran the roulette table at Rick’s Café in Casablanca.

I’ll definitely watch this one again.

The Women of ELT?

I’ve just written a book on language teaching methods, in which I revisit 30 different methods and their founding fathers. I use the term ‘fathers’ deliberately, since not a single method was designed by a woman – although it’s a safe bet that a good few women were involved in the actual teaching of these […]

via W is for Women in ELT — An A-Z of ELT

This is a reblog of Scott Thornbury’s post. Today many women move the field forward.

Travel Theme: Heat

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What does heat conjure up for you? If you fancy exploring the unfamiliar, exotic and unknown for this week’s travel theme (everyone’s welcome!) here’s what to do:

Create your own post and title it Travel Theme: Heat
Include a link to this page in your post so others can find it too
Watch out for the next travel theme which will come out next weekend
Don’t forget to subscribe to keep up to date on the latest weekly travel themes. Sign up via the email subscription link in the sidebar or RSS.
❤ Ailsa of Where’s My Backpack?

Weekly Photo Challenge: Satisfaction

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Wednesday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Indonesian Bathrooms

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kamar mandi and squat toilet — cleaner than most

Going to the bathroom in Indonesia is quite different from in the West or in Thailand, Korea, China or Japan. For one thing they don’t use toilet paper so if, like me, you’re staying for just a short time, you should carry tissue with you everywhere.

Also unless you’re in a hotel that’s modern, there will be squat toilet and a cistern called a kamar mandi next to it. The kamar mandi is used to clean yourself up using a small bucket that will be provided. Scoop water to clean your private parts and hands.

Here’s a good blog post for more information

N.B. Bring a little towel or paper towels because you usually won’t find those.

Computer Woe

Now I’m doing a volunteer teacher training stint in Indonesia and wouldn’t you know my power cord breaks. I can borrow from a student, but that doesn’t help me on weekends and I don’t want to be stuck.

Right now I’m quickly writing with 12% of my batter power remaining. It’s tough to prepare a class and have this limitation.

I checked the price of a new cord from Apple and gulped at the $75 price. Even the generic $25 cost is more than I’d like. Fifteen dollars or just producing cords that don’t break the way phone cords, lamp cords, TV cords, etc. usually don’t.

What’s something you’ve learned to fix yourself? Did it give you

I am rather hopeful that here we can find someone who can fix the cord using a technique like the one above or the other below. I don’t care what my charger looks like and this hack is so appealing. It gives me that joy of fixing something and saving money.

Admittedly, I won’t fix this since I don’t have the tools, but I get satisfaction out of having something repaired rather than just always buying a replacement. Do you?

What’s something you fixed and saved money as a result>

Silent Sunday

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SilentSunday

Adopt-a-Graduate

It may be time for such a charity.

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