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Can’t Believe It

I thought my Air Canada experience was quite good and that I’d fly them again and again, two or three times back and forth from Chicago to China.

Then I picked up my new suitcase and saw the side bashed in. Since then my dealings with Air Canada have been wretched.

I’ve described how I couldn’t find anyone to help with the problem at the airport and no one responded to my online form. So I took the bag back to the airport on Jan. 20th. Since then I’ve called and gotten no information about the status of my bag.

I leave for China Sunday, tomorrow. I called them on Wednesday after getting no response to my second online form. After a half hour wait, Fiona answered the call. I told her the details of my problem and she promised to look into it. Later that day, she called and left a message. She spoke a mile a minute and it was impossible to catch the number though I tried a few possibilities. Her message said she hadn’t found the bag but had made a bit of progress.

If it’s your profession to speak on the phone, clear, slow speech is a must.

Now I’ve been on the line for half an hour waiting for someone to pick up.

While waiting I wrote to the travel ombudsmen who’s column appears in the Chicago Tribune. I think he’s my only hope. I would like the bag either delivered to China or a check.

Finally, I got a clerk to talk to me. She couldn’t help me I have to call another phone number. She couldn’t connect me. This is beyond aggravating. I have to go out and can’t hang on the line all afternoon.

Air Canada must hate its passengers. I swear if I owned a company, I would not make people wait more than 5 minutes. That should be illegal.

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L’Avventura

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Anna (L) and Claudia (R)

I admit I didn’t much like L’Avventura, the story of a rich Italian woman who goes missing while on a weekend away with her rich, jaded friends. I concede that the actors were gorgeous and skillful; the sets and cinematography excellent, but the story was lacking and the personalities were exasperating.

The story’s simple. Anna is unhappy in a general alienated 1960s way. She bickers with her boyfriend and pouts a lot because life’s missing something. When she’s off on a boat with her friends she dives in the water and is never seen of again. I do mean that. We don’t ever see her and though I can appreciate innovation in plots, this was too much. While her friends and father search for her, her boyfriend (he’s no boy – these characters seem to be in their late 20s or 30s) and her best friend Claudia go to look for her. Looking for Anna becomes insignificant compared to Claudia and Sando, Anna’s boyfriend, who embark on romance spiced up with occasional pangs of guilt on Claudia’s part.

The film is striking and beautiful. I did buy into Claudia’s dramatic emotions as she pushed and pulled at Sando. Much of the film is a critique of the shallow lives of the rich. I didn’t quite buy it, true as it might be. The characters were simply playboys and playgirls and I found it hard to actually believe they couldn’t find something to dedicate their lives to. I suppose there are people like this.

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