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For those Long Flights

These tips should help your skin and general feeling of well being.

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Tasmania

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Since I have friends in Tasmania, I thought I should hop off the mainland and see what Hobart and its environs had to offer. I discovered that incredible nature and a more relaxed pace abounded in Tasmania.

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Tasmanian Tiger

Here’s what I learned about Tasmania:

  • The Tasmanian Devil is familiar to non-Australians because of the cartoon character but the Tasmanian Tiger was more of the state’s symbol than the former. However, the Tasmanian Tiger has been extinct (or believed to be so — some claim to have seen signs of them) for decades.
  • The tallest flowering tree, the eucalyptus regnans can be found here. The only tree that’s taller is the California redwood.
  • What is now called Tasmania has been inhabited by aborigines for approximated 12,000 years when it was cut off from the mainland.
  • Tasmania was named after Abel Janszoon Tasman, a the Dutch explorer, who saw what is now Tasmania in 1642.

My first full day in Tasmania I went with my friend cum hostess to the Tasmanian National Park, which was swarming with tourists, which is quite uncommon. We saw the Tessellated Pavement, which is an area of flat rock on the ocean. The ocean has cut into the rock over the course of time and what’s unusual about that is that the cuts are at right angles. It looks manmade, but isn’t. We also saw the Remarkable Cave, which is an arch from the land to the ocean, the Blowhole, a natural pool where water shoots up periodically, and lots of gorgeous seascape.

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  • My second day we went to Mt. Field National Park where there’s a rainforest and famed waterfall. This rainforest is home to the eucaluptus regnans.

    We had a great day strolling through Salamanca, the hip part of town by the harbor. (Sorry I can’t find photos.) Salamanca is home to dozens of craft shops, restaurants, bars and cafés.

    Day three was spent at the beach in Dodge’s Ferry, Tasmania. A word to the wise: reapply the sunscreen often. I’m still peeling my sunburned skin off. Still it was a wonderful trip. I want to go back to see Tassie’s funky Museum of Old and New Art (MONA).

    Silent Sunday

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    Real Frequent Flyer Pros

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    I have read the One Mile at a Time blog to learn about getting miles more wisely, but while amazed at the stories of flying internationally in first class on miles, I hadn’t followed any of the hints yet. I just came upon an article in Rolling Stone about Ben Schlappig a “Hobbyist,” i.e. a person p who as a hobby fly all over the world gaming frequent flyer programs. They accrue miles and fly the world in first class far cheaply. It’s an interesting profile. Since he was a young teen Schlappig has been flying for fun and figuring out the system. He’s not alone. There’s a community of people who almost compete to see how many miles they can rack up or how little they can pay for the ability to do so. From this group are some helpful websites.

    Skiplagged.com is designed by Hobbyists and it’s like a Kayak. It’s a site that searches and find the best fares. It’s so good that United tried to sue them to stop posting fares which their system posted erroneously.

    Flyer Talk is a forum for Hobbyists and it appears that they’ll help newcomers by giving information e.g. which credit cards give you the most miles or which Star Alliance (or other) group is the best to join based on your travel or spending patterns.

     

     

    Sepia Saturday

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    Jazz singers, quintessentially American. Here are a few legends.

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    Billie Holiday, Library of Congress, 1947

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    Nat King Cole, Library of Congress 1947

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    Sarah Vaughan, Library of Congress, 1947

    Weekly Photo Challenge: Repurposed

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    Made from magazine pages

    1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

    2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

    3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

    Other Weekly Photo Challenge photos:

    Mary Tyler Moore

    Mary Tyler Moore, a paragon of excellence, died this week. I saw her on the Dick Van Dyke Show and later The Mary Tyler Moore Show, where she blossomed. Her work, comedy and drama, was high caliber, always high caliber. I miss that. She showed that you can entertain without stooping to the lowest common denominator. Above is an interview with another TV great, Johnny Carson.

    Thanks to Eva, for sharing this clip of Mary on Sesame Street in Isreal. I love how approachable she is and how she’s able to connect with the girl and laugh at herself. The essence of good comedy.

    Isn’t it nice to know she liked cheeseburgers and could laugh at herself.

    Chinese Zumba?

    Here’s my first stab at an iMovie. It’s less than a minute long. The guy in the orange was so joyful.

    Apple Problem

    I bought a Mac mini to take to China hoping that a new computer that’s powerful would get me better internet speed. It wasn’t any better. Seems the problem isn’t the computer, it’s the system.

    So I’ve brought the Mac Mini home to set up here. I would like using a desktop with its bigger monitor as an alternative to my laptop. I found a refurbished screen on Best Buy for just $56 so I was uplifted with that purchase.

    But after setting up the monitor, I ran into trouble. I have a Bluetooth keyboard that I need to set up. However, I set up the computer to require a user enter their password. Here’s the problem. I need to connect the Bluetooth keyboard to the computer to enter a password. I can’t enter this password since the keyboard isn’t linked yet.

    So I’ve tried to contact Apple either to have them call me for service or to set up an appointment. I can’t do any of this without knowing the computer’s serial number. The serial number isn’t on the computer. It’s found by viewing the “About” screen, which I can’t get to since the keyboard doesn’t work.

    It’s so frustrating. I guess I’m going to go to an Apple store, explain the problem and request help to make an appointment through them. It’s so aggravating. I realize they design their system with just the usual problems in mind. No one on staff probably foresaw my problem.

    I’d hoped I could call this in and get help.

    Marguerite

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    Touching and true, Marguerite (2015) is set in France of the 1920s. The central character Marguerite loves music and supports her local music club lavishing funds on them with the one stipulation that she’s allowed to sing at various concerts. The film opens with such a concert that she hosts at her mansion. The musicians and young singer who opens the performance are top notch, but when Marguerite takes the stage glass cracks and you want to cover your ears. She has no idea what pitch is. Two cads from Paris who crash the event are delighted. Their twisted sensibilities find her the perfect means of satirizing the current art scene.

    Yet no one — not her unfaithful husband, her duplicitous servant, the voice coach who’s desperate for money or her friends at the music club — will tell her the truth. Encouraged by the cads, Marguerite decides to sing publicly and while many know they should tell Marguerite that she can’t sing, no one can burst her bubble.

    Listening to Marguerite’s screeching and seeing her tricked all the way to the rather sad ending isn’t easy but it is enjoyable enough. It was good for a long flight and the lead actress Catherine Frot made me sympathize with and like a character who would be easy to look down on.

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