Word of the Week

discept, v.
[‘ intr. To dispute, debate; (also) to express disagreement; to differ from (an opinion, etc.).’]
Pronunciation: Brit. /dᵻˈsɛpt/, U.S. /dᵻˈsɛpt/
Etymology: < classical Latin disceptāre to dispute, debate, argue, to arbitrate, to judge, decide < dis- dis- prefix + captāre captate v.
Compare earlier disceptation n., disception n.
Now rare. intr. To dispute, debate; (also) to express disagreement; to differ from (an opinion, etc.).1639 W. Lacey Iudgm. conc. W. Chillingworth x. 47 The differences of Sectaries among themselues in most substantiall points of faith; and those of Catholiques discepting and discussing difficulties occurring, as yet vndecreed and vndetermined by authority.
1652 J. Gaule Πυς-μαντια 27 It is God that thus discepts with you.
1818 T. L. Peacock Nightmare Abbey xi. 150 Permit me to discept.
1869 R. Browning Ring & Bk. IV. x. 59, I try it with my reason, nor discept From any point I probe and pronounce sound.
1925 Times Lit. Suppl. 12 Mar. 169/1 He discepts and distinguishes, classifies his kinds of tragedy, his orders of comedy, his new shoots of opera, burlesque and pantomime.

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