Advertisements

American Writers Museum

DSCN6783

Timeline

This year the American Writers Museum in Chicago on Michigan Avenue. It was high time I visited so despite the rain and cold, I took a friend from Milwaukee to explore it.

After showing our tickets, which I bought online and got a 20% discount on, we were directed to start our visit on the right where there is a timeline of American writers.

If you look up on the left and you’ll see a timeline of American history. Under that is the main exhibit showing a chronological series of portraits of significant American writers. When you turn the panel, which has three sides, you’ll find more information and background about each writer. Below is information on a well designed panel about various literary movements or authors. It’s a lot of reading, but its well presented. Also, the curators seem to have made an effort to present authors from all backgrounds. Across from the time line is a wall of squares with author’s quotations. The squares move to reveal an panel with more information or a video.

DSCN6779

Parallel to the gallery with the timeline was a photo exhibit on biographies, written by or on authors or celebrities along with their photos. The black and white photos of 50+ years ago were my favorite. There’s something about the crisp gradations and the styles of bygone eras that we just don’t see much anymore.

The next room I saw was the Readers Room which focuses on reading. It highlights different kinds of reading, such as educational, newspapers, magazines and more. There are two interactive screens where you can submit your favorite authors and see the most popular authors or books other visitors have chosen.

Another gallery had a small exhibit on Laura Ingles Wilder with biographical information, maps of where each of her books was set, depiction of her work in other formats and critical responses to her works.

The museum has a table with different typewriters, from the earliest kind to Selectric to a laptop. People were pounding away at the old typewriters while the laptop wasn’t used while I was there.

fullsizeoutput_d3c

Quotation, Octavia Butler

Then there was an exhibit on the skills of writing with interactive exhibits on specificity, making prose active and such.

Finally, there was an area dedicated to Chicago writers like Saul Bellow, Ida B. Wells, Mike Royko, Ring Larder, Gwendolyn Brooks, Carl Sandburg, Theodore Dreiser, Peter Finley Dunne and many more. Here you could listen to short recordings of their work and see these turnable banners with their portraits and information on their work.

fullsizeoutput_d34

Each month the museum offers several programs including public readings. The staff was very helpful as we went through the galleries. They’d point out little things like the mural in the children’s room which had squirrels in a tree reading Caldecott award winning books and each squirrel had some element that related to the story it was reading. For example, the squirrel reading Charlotte’s Web, had a wisp of a web hanging over it.

All in all, I give the museum a thumbs up and will be back. I’d say allow an hour to get through the museum. If there’s a program, add more time.

Tickets: Adults $12, Students $8, discounts for children and seniors.

 

Advertisements

Sepia Saturday

Sepia Saturday Theme Image 394

Sepia Saturday Theme Image 394

A lady with a basket of flowers portraying grace, elegance and peace, a great inspiration.

girl flower8295513146_88f7222937_z

From the Library of Congress, 1910

flowers ivory girl

Miami Museum

bertha denmark

Bertha Wit, Royal Library of Denmark, n.d.

 

Word of the Week

600hygge1

By Dani Dipirro, 2016

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh not hoo-gah) is a Danish word used when acknowledging a feeling or moment, whether alone or with friends, at home or out, ordinary or extraordinary as cosy, charming or special.

I love this word that’s new to me. I found an audio book entitled “The Little Book of Hygge” at the library by accident. I’m listening to it now and will write a review once I’m finished. For now, take a look at the images below. These are the photos that a search on Flickr.com for hygge.

Screen Shot 2017-11-17 at 5.50.25 PM

Notice all the candles and sheep

Below is an infographic that shows the elements of hygge.

hygge

Thanksgiving Dinner Strategy

Reasonable ideas to not blow your healthy eating habits with Thanksgiving. I admit I’ll indulge more. I think your daily eating habits are what makes the difference. I can do better with that and resist the temptation to hibernate and eat heavier food as winter nears.

Company

Screen Shot 2017-11-16 at 1.31.43 PMI had no idea when I went to Northwestern’s production of Company by Stephen Sondheim and George Furth, that the story was famous. I actually thought that the musical would be about corporate America. I wasn’t adverse to different subject matter though.

The performers were remarkable, which is usually the case at Northwestern. They got the songs pitch perfect and every step of each dance was on the money.

However, the story itself seemed dated. I couldn’t put my finger on which decade the story was from, but I guessed the 80’s. (I was just off by a decade it was the 70s). Company is about Bobby, a man, who’s just turned 35 and he’s still single, while all his friends are married. These couples are devoted to Bobby and inviting him to their homes seems to be the peak of their social lives. I couldn’t get over how much they cared about Bobby and how much they worried that he was still single. At a certain point, I’d expect people to move on. It wasn’t like Bobby had cancer or a family tragedy that meant people should focus on him so much.

Bobby wasn’t an especially interesting person. He didn’t have an interesting job. In fact we didn’t know what work he did. He wasn’t hilariously funny, or especially generous or active. He had no special expertise. He was just a guy. He had three girls whom he dated, but he didn’t have a particular interest in one. He didn’t criticize these women, but he was lukewarm about them, just as he was lukewarm about every other facet of life.

The friends follow what I call the “Little Women” characterization model. Each person has their own talent, problem or outlook that defines them. One woman’s neurotically afraid of getting married to her live in boyfriend. That boyfriend is very patient. One woman controls her husband’s drinking and does judo. That husband has been caught driving drunk. We don’t know much of anything about these stereotypical characters. I suppose that’s the case with musicals and often opera, little or no character complexity or change, but great music.

I have a hard time with plays or books where the hero is indecisive start to finish, where he or she is wishy washy or noncommittal. I realize that’s a very modern attitude, but I don’t need to spend two hours putting my life on hold and watching someone who’s a wet noodle.

The ending was particularly disappointing. It’s hard to fathom how this play won seven Tony Awards, except that it came out in the 1970s and then it might have been innovative. Now, even with updates like cell phone use, it’s ho hum. Marriage, while on the decrease, is still a big part of life and debates on its merits are nothing new.

So I can’t recommend this show, which plays through Nov. 19th.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Experimental

IMG_20161231_111655

Modern Art in Beijing

IMG_20170109_122320

Street Art, Melbourne, Australia

DSCN6034

Art in Taipei

1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Wednesday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Just a few wonderful posts:

Poem of the Week

The Glory Is Fallen Out Of

e.e. cummings

the glory is fallen out of
the sky the last immortal
leaf
is dead and the gold
year
a formal spasm
in the

dust
this is the passing of all shining things
therefore we also
blandly

into receptive
earth, O let
us
descend

take
shimmering wind
these fragile splendors from
us crumple them hide

them in thy breath drive
them in nothingness
for we
would sleep

this is the passing of all shining things
no lingering no backward-
wondering be unto
us O

soul, but straight
glad feet fear ruining
and glory girded
faces

lead us
into the
serious
steep darkness

Tooting My Own Horn

trumpet bigger

Despite a morning which got way off track, I have passed the 25,000 word half way mark of National Novel Writing Month.

Also, I’d like to thank the Northbrook Public Library for hosting a weekly Write In. I’ve gone the last two Sundays and I always write more at these events. I like how I’m part of a writing community. I never knew there were so many writers in my hometown.

I’d keep going, but I need to get the ingredients for the Chinese stew I’m making for dinner tonight. I hope the recipe I found is like the one I ate in Jinan.

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge

 

IMG_20170103_113116

National Gallery of New South Wales

fullsizeoutput_943

Taipei Museum of Fine Art, Taiwan

Each week Cee of Cee’s Photography challenges bloggers with a fun prompt. This week we’re to find photos of subjects that contain the Letter M at least twice anywhere in the word.  As a museum lover, this was a snap.

If you want to see more Letter M photos, go here.

cffc

Elizabeth’s Secret, George’s Paranoia

Screen Shot 2017-11-12 at 8.19.13 PM

Demelza and Hugh

Poldark, Season 3, Episode 8

What a season we’ve had. This week George grew more and more suspicious of Elizabeth. He refused to have anything to do with baby Valentine. He interrogated Dwight about the differences between 8 month old premies and full term 9 month olds. Dwight stayed true to his ethics and kept mum not playing into George’s hands.

Inadvertently, Ross irked George in one of their exchanges he mentioned “blood.” Ross is clueless about Valentines paternity, but later found out that most likely he’s the father. When he met Elizabeth, by chance, in the church she filled him in and they deduced that Aunt Agatha’s death was tied to George’s curiosity. This storyline shows tight, Aristotelian writing. What could be a more perfect problem for George than Ross being Valentine’s father? Nothing.

George is focusing on his political career. Angry with Elizabeth, he intends to spend most of his time in London at Parliament. This just reminds us all how much better it would be for everyone if Ross had stepped into politics. George has reduced the wages for miners by 30%. Imagine how you’d get by if your salary went down 30%. George sure is loathsome.

Hugh Armitage, who’s new this season, is sweet on Demelza. He’s sending her portraits and poetry, while Ross takes her for granted and is back to dreaming about Elizabeth. To her great credit, Demelza really wants to stay true to Ross. Boy, does he make that hard as he is so ho hum about his beautiful, kind, strong wife.

Poor Morwenna gave birth to a son. Yet Osborne, a despicable vicar, despite Dwight, her doctor’s instruction, continues to demand his clumsy, painful conjugal rights. Luckily, Elizabeth spoke to Osborne, who ignored her. The race for most selfish devil is neck and neck between George and Rev. Osborne.

Rowenna, Morwenna’s young subtly flirtatious sister, is enticing Osborne by undressing and bathing in front of a peep hole that I think she’s aware of. She makes a point of mentioning that she’s going to take a bath or that she’s got a problem with her toes. She’s well aware of Osborne’s foot fetish. I’ve seen the 1970s production so I know what’s coming, I’m just not sure when or how. Will Osborne get his comeuppance next week? I hope so, but it may take awhile.

Previous Older Entries

Disclaimer

Dear Fellows, The State Department has requested that any Fellows who maintain their own blog or website please post the following disclaimer on your site: "This website is not an official U.S. Department of State website. The views and information presented are the English Language Fellows' own and do not represent the English Language Fellow Program or the U.S. Department of State." We appreciate your cooperation. Site Meter
%d bloggers like this: