Weekly Photo Challenge: Inspiration

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1. Each week, we’ll provide a theme for creative inspiration. You take photographs based on your interpretation of the theme, and post them on your blog (a new post!) anytime before the following Friday when the next photo theme will be announced.

2. To make it easy for others to check out your photos, title your blog post “Weekly Photo Challenge: (theme of the week)” and be sure to use the “postaday″ tag.

3. Follow The Daily Post so that you don’t miss out on weekly challenge announcements, and subscribe to our newsletter – we’ll highlight great posts. Add Media photos from each month’s most popular challenge.

Other great photos:

Silent Sunday

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CDP August Theme: Bicycle

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Yes, it’s Theme Day on City Daily Photo.

Originally posted on Jinan Daily Photo: The Sequel:

Can it be a new month’s started already?

Sure, has, which means it’s time for a new City Daily Photo (CDP) theme and for August it’s: bicycle. I liked this teal bike. You don’t see teal bicycles all that often in the US.

If you’d like to check out more bicycle photos, click here.

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Annotated Bibliography of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition

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1893 World’s Fair, Chicago, history, book collecting

I’m working on a project for a rare books class I took two weeks ago. It’s an annotated bibliography of books on Chicago. I discovered, and promptly bought on Amazon,

Dybwad, G.L., and Bliss, Joy V. Annotated Bibliography: World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago 1893. Albuquerque, NM, 1992.

Organized by type of item, this bibliography includes a brief history of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition (WCE), a fold out map of the WCE and its organization chart. This source includes chapters on fiction, poetry and children’s books, exposition publications, federal publications, guides, periodicals, music, salesmen’s samples, recent books and unpublished unique works. The introduction is written by Dybwad and explains why he started this project.

The entries in this source date from before the fair to 1991.

The bibliographers designed the format and organized the source with a view to ease of use. Abbreviations and citations are clearly explained and the indexes cross-reference items so if users don’t know the author’s name or the title of an item, they can still find it relatively easily. Each entry is concise and provides a brief description of each item. When available, the bibliographers list price information, however, following the Introduction, there’s a note on price stating principles in pricing and reasons for variance. (No doubt since 1992 these prices have changed.)

For books, there is minimal collation*  information. This book is a comprehensive source, which would aid researchers and collectors.

*Collation data describes the paper, binding and book as a physical object.

Thirst

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Call me a philistine but Thirst (1949) is the first Ingmar Berman film I’ve seen. Hmm. I can’t say I liked it, though there were shots that were captivating like when two young dancers are seen in a dressing room mirror and their grouchy teacher’s seen in the mirror beside it.

However, this film about a married couple and their previous lovers didn’t do much for me. I was put off by their intense “go for the throat” arguments. The heroine, a young dancer who’s career’s ended, was egotistical, selfish and mean. No doubt Bergman wanted to show intense feeling when you want to kill or tell your partner to go to hell, but do we need 100 minutes of this? All the characters seemed both sadistic and masochistic. I suppose the raw emotion and language was modern for the 1940s, but it didn’t do anything for me, except make me not want to visit Sweden.

Seeing that last week I saw and enjoyed Passing Fancy, which I grant is a comedy so not comparable, it was perhaps harder to appreciate Thirst. In Passing Fancy we also see characters who’ve had it with each other, who tell each other they hate them, but the storm passes and other emotions exist. In Thirst when a couple reconciles a bit you believe they still want their partner to die and go to hell. Lovely. Charming.

Actually, Thirst seemed like a bit of hell on earth.

I won’t swear off Bergman, but I’m not in a hurry to see more.

I think I need to see more Poldark and Ozu to counteract the Bergman effect.

More Photos of Turpan

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Bilingual Mandarin & Uighur

Bilingual Mandarin & Uighur

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Turpan: A Day Trip

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Welcome to Turpan – Outside the bus station

As I’d covered Urumqi’s charms (and hassles) and wanted to see more of Xinjiang province, I followed the advice of my hotel’s general manager and headed for Turpan, a town about 2½ hours by bus from Urumqi. I envisioned a less militarized, more charming town.

I made the mistake of taking a taxi to the bus station. Don’t do that. My driver took a longer, more expensive route. Both the BRT 1 and BRT 3 buses, among others, will get you from the city center to the south bus station. There are buses leaving every 20 minutes so don’t be taken in by the touts in front of the station who will drive you.

Along the way, the landscape is stark, but that’s Xinjiang. There were some windmills and construction, but otherwise little to look at. Bring a book and you’ll be fine.

The Lonely Planet warned that Turpan is in the “Death Valley of China.” Temperatures can surpass 100°F (40°C), so I was glad I had my sunscreen and parasol. There isn’t much to the town. The bus station was a block away. After passing the butcher and getting some cold water at a general store, I soon found the traditional market.

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Entrance to the market

As in Urumqi, you have to pass through security to get into the market or just about anywhere. Still the market was fun to wander through.

I just had some bread for lunch sitting in a park under a big tree.

I wandered a bit more looking for the museum, but it was so hot that I contented myself with the central park and an air conditioned underground mall, which was cool, but oddly empty.

Silent Sunday

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Passing Fancy

Kahichi and son Tomio

Kahichi and son Tomio

Yasujiro Ozu’s Passing Fancy (1933) takes us into the shitamachi, i.e. tenement neighborhood of Tokyo where factory worker Kihachi, a widower, lives with his young son, Tomio. The film opens with Kihachi watching a storyteller with his neighbors. The scene with Kihachi battling a fly are comedic. After the show, Kihachi meets Harue, a young, pretty woman who’s just last her job and has no where to go.

Not only is Kihachi moved, he’s smitten. His young neighbor Jiro kids Kihachi urging him not to get his hopes up. A lazy, uneducated jokester, Kihachi’s amusing, but you know he’ll never get ahead. Moreover, you know he’ll never get the girl. His hopes die hard. He’s unaware of Harue’s soft spot for Jiro, who rebuffs her advances. Still her continued love for Jiro means she’s never going to fall for Kihachi.

Tomio’s a good student and impudent son. His classmates taunt him and in turn, Tomio puts down his father for his illiteracy and lazy ways. The argument escalates, but Kihachi realizes his son’s situation and gives a lot of money to spend as he wishes. He hopes the windfall will alleviate the pains of their poverty however briefly. But Tomio, who’s about 9 or 10, gorges himself on sweets, which results in a critical illness. With Tomio in the hospital Kihachi, Jiro, Harue and another neighbor are brought together.

It's never explained why Tomio's got the eye patch

It’s never explained why Tomio’s got the eye patch

The silent film moves slowly by modern standards, but is full of touching scenes that will reward patient viewers. Ozu’s characters are engaging. I particularly liked that the boy was sometimes the model son, who has to make his drunken father get up for work, sometimes a victim and sometimes a brat. It isn’t often that children are so multi-dimensional in film.

Related

Sepia Saturday

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It’s off to the beach or seaside with Sepia Saturday. Here’s a few photos of some bathing beauties.

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The Mermaid Club, 1910

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Source: Library of Congress, 1914

Olympic Swimmers, 1912

Source: National Library of Ireland, 1914. Two children at the beach

Source: Library of Congress

Source: Library of Congress

If you’d like to see more nostalgic summer beach photos, click here.

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